Stats & Info: Georgetown Hoyas

Texas isn't too big for De'Andre Haskins

November, 20, 2012
11/20/12
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Player of the Night: De’Andre Haskins
Four years removed from playing in Division I, Haskins led Division II Chaminade to an improbable 86-73 upset of the Texas Longhorns in the Maui Invitational. The former Valparaiso guard put up a career-high 32 points and nine rebounds to give Chaminade its seventh win in 83 games at the Maui Invitational. Haskins didn’t score until nearly nine minutes into the game and had just five points at halftime. Two of Chaminade’s wins have come at the expense of Texas head coach Rick Barnes. In 1991, Barnes Providence squad lost to Chaminade.

Stat Sheet Stuffer: Otto Porter
Porter did a little bit of everything in leading Georgetown to a 78-70 win against the No. 11 UCLA Bruins. He finished with 18 points, 11 rebounds, five assists, five blocks and three steals. Porter, a sophomore, is just the fourth power conference player with 15 points, 10 rebounds, five blocks and five assists in a game over the past 10 seasons. Joining Porter on that list are Ekpe Udoh, Geoff McDermott and Luke Harangody. The last Georgetown player to reach all of those levels in a game was Michael Sweetney in 2002-03.

Freshman of the Night: Brandon Ashley
Ashley scored 20 points on 6-6 shooting and added 10 rebounds as Arizona topped Long Beach State 94-72. Ashley is the only freshman over the past 15 seasons from a power six conference with a 20-10 game in which he didn’t miss a field goal. The 16th ranked recruit in the ESPN 100, Ashley is the first player on that list with a 20-10 game, and just the fourth freshman nationally. Chase Budinger and Derrick Williams are the only other Wildcats to post a 20-10 game as a freshman over the past 10 seasons.

Scorer of the Night: C.J. McCollum
Just another 35-point effort for McCollum, as Lehigh rolled to an 82-67 win against Fairfield. The nation’s leading active scorer had 36 points in Lehigh’s season opener against Baylor. Over the last five years, the only other players with multiple 35-point efforts in November were Oregon State’s Jared Cunningham (2011-12), Washington State’s Klay Thompson (2009-10), Kentucky’s Jodie Meeks (2008-09) and Davidson’s Stephen Curry (2008-09).

Strange Stat Line of the Night: Martins Abele
In Duquesne’s 90-88 win against James Madison, the 7-footer from Latvia made his presence known in the box score despite playing just five minutes. Abele managed three blocks and five personal fouls. Since 2000, only two other players have fouled out in five minutes or fewer and also blocked three shots. In January 2001, Maryland’s Chris Wilcox did it against Wake Forest. A month later, Rutgers’ Eugene Dabney did so against Georgetown.

Victory is sweet for Wolfpack, Spartans

March, 18, 2012
3/18/12
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Greg Bartram/US Presswire
C.J. Williams celebrates North Carolina State's first trip to the Sweet 16 since 2005.
Here's a snapshot look at the early-afternoon games as eight more teams look to advance to the Sweet 16 on Sunday.

(11) North Carolina State 66, (3) Georgetown 63
The North Carolina State Wolfpack were the 68th team to hear their name called on Selection Sunday. One week later, they are among the 16 teams to survive the first weekend of play, advancing to the Sweet 16 for the first time since 2005.

NC State erased an early 10-point deficit with a 30-9 run over 11 minutes spanning the first and second half, and held off a late rally by the Georgetown Hoyas for the 3-point victory.

The Wolfpack used a strong inside game to dominate the Hoyas on the boards. NC State grabbed more than twice as many offensive rebounds as Georgetown and nearly doubled up the Hoyas in second-chance points.

C.J. Leslie had seven second-chance points, nearly as many as the entire Georgetown team, and 10 of the Wolfpack’s 20 points in the paint.

NC State’s efficiency on the perimeter also proved to be a key weapon in the upset win. The Wolfpack made 7-of-15 shots (47 percent) from beyond the arc against a Georgetown team that entered the game holding opponents to a Division I-best 28 percent shooting on 3-point attempts this season.

The early-round upset loss for Georgetown was hardly a surprise. This is the third straight year the Hoyas have been eliminated by a team seeded at least five spots lower. They are the third team with such a streak, joining DePaul (1980-82) and Florida (2002-04).

(1) Michigan State 65, (9) Saint Louis 61
The Spartans advance to the Sweet 16 for the fourth time in the last five seasons thanks to another big game from senior Draymond Green.

Green stuffed the stat sheet with 16 points, 13 rebounds and six assists. It’s his eighth game this season with at least 15 points, 10 rebounds and five assists – no other player in Division I has more than three such games.

Michigan State sealed the win with a much-improved half-court offense after halftime.

The Spartans shot over 60 percent in the half-court and turned the ball over just twice in the final 20 minutes, after coughing it up eight times on 29 half-court possessions in the first half.

The Saint Louis Billikens were looking for their first Sweet 16 appearance but once again Rick Majerus failed to reach the second weekend with an underdog.

Majerus is now 0-5 all-time in the Round of 32 as a lower seed, including a loss to the Spartans in 2000 when they won the national championship.

UConn's Andre Drummond stands out

January, 10, 2012
1/10/12
1:03
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Andre Drummond's big night
Andre Drummond lived up the hype of being the second-ranked incoming freshman in the nation. In Connecticut’s 64-57 win over West Virginia, Drummond went off for 20 points on 9-for-11 shooting, and added 11 rebounds.

It’s the first 20-10 game of his career. That’s something even Emeka Okafor never pulled off as a freshman. Drummond is the first UConn freshman with a 20-10 game since Caron Butler in 2000-01.

Dellavedova leads hot-shooting Gaels
In an 87-72 win over San Francisco, St. Mary’s shot 67.3 percent from the field. That was the Gaels’ highest field goal percentage in the past 15 years. They fell just short of the school-record 68.4 field goal percentage set in 1983 against San Diego. Matthew Dellavedova netted a career-high 27 points, while Stephen Holt fell one rebound shy of a triple-double.

Hoyas hardly miss, but lose
Sean Kilpatrick went off for a career-high 27 points, as Cincinnati came away from Washington, DC with a 68-64 win over Georgetown. The Hoyas lost despite a 59.1 field goal percentage. That’s Georgetown’s best shooting game in a loss since a 63.4 mark in a 2008 NCAA Tournament loss to Stephen Curry and Davidson. Meanwhile, it’s the highest opponent field goal percentage in a Cincinnati win in at least the past 15 years.

Nash stepping up in Big 12 play
Le’Bryan Nash stepped up his game for the Bedlam Series, matching a career-high with 21 points, as Oklahoma State came away with a 72-65 win over Oklahoma.

After averaging 11.7 points per game in non-conference play, Nash is putting up 18.0 in three Big 12 games. That places him third in the Big 12 in scoring during conference play, behind only Travis Releford and Marcus Denmon.

Grambling State wins another
For awhile it didn’t seem as through Grambling State would win a game this season. Now, the Tigers have two victories. Quincy Roberts, a transfer from St. John’s, netted 26 points in a 72-71 win over Alcorn State. Grambling State won despite recording only four assists. That tied the second-fewest assists in a win this season in Division I.

MWC continues to climb in power rankings

January, 10, 2012
1/10/12
10:52
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The Big Ten remains at the top of ESPN Stats and Info’s weekly college basketball power rankings, but the Mountain West has continued to move closer to the ACC and the top five.

For a complete recap of how we rank the conferences, click here and here.

The computers have continued to rate the Big Ten highly, as their ranking increased from 56.0 to 49.7 this week. The conference now has three teams in the top eight in the nation, with Ohio State, Michigan State and Indiana continuing to win during Big Ten play.

The Mountain West Conference has consistently increased its final rating throughout the season, and is at a season high 78.4 this week, now just two points behind the ACC. The MWC has two teams ranked in both the AP and ESPN/USA Today Top 25 polls for the second straight week, and UNLV jumped five spots in both polls this week from 17 to 12.

The conference has performed very well in out-of-conference games this season, posting a .765 winning percentage, the fourth-highest of any conference. The Mountain West ranks above the ACC, SEC and Pac-12 in out-of-conference winning percentage, and had its most success against the Pac-12, winning 11 of 14 games.

The highest human bonus went to the Big 12 this week. Although Missouri lost to Kansas State last Saturday, the Wildcats capitalized on that win to move up from 22 to 18 in both polls, and Kansas joined Mizzou and Baylor in the top 10.

While the Big East was previously at the top of the human bonus, it has faltered lately and is now the fourth-rated conference according to the human polls. Syracuse is still controlling the top of both polls, but Connecticut, Louisville and Georgetown struggled last week, all falling out of the top 10.

The Pac-12 dropped to a season-low ninth in the power rankings this week, and is now sitting behind three mid-major conference teams.

Towson ties losing streak record
With a 60-27 defeat at the hands of Drexel, Towson tied a record with its 34th straight loss, a streak that began on Jan. 3, 2011. That matches the longest losing streak in Division I history, also done by Sacramento State from 1997 to 1999. NJIT lost 51 straight from 2007 to 2009, but was reclassifying to Division I at the time.

On Wednesday, Towson suffered arguably its most humiliating loss of the current streak. The Tigers’ 27 points were their fewest since moving to Division I in 1979. It also set a CAA record for fewest points in a conference game. In addition, Towson hit only eight field goals, with only one player, Robert Nwankwo, making more than one.

Hoyas climb back against Marquette
Georgetown only missed one 2-point field goal in the second half in its 73-70 comeback win over Marquette. The Hoyas shot 76.2 percent in the second half, including 12-for-13 from inside the arc.

Marquette led by 17 points with 13 minutes to play, but the Hoyas went on a 27-10 run over the next 10 minutes. The final score would be Georgetown’s largest lead of the game. Jason Clark had 18 of his game-high 26 points in the second half. The Hoyas have a D-I best four wins over ranked opponents.

Jayhawks conquer the boards
Kansas owned the boards in its 67-49 win over Kansas State. The Jayhawks held a 50-26 advantage on the glass, including 44-15 when looking at just the starting lineups. It matched a 2002 contest against Oklahoma for the most the Wildcats have been outrebounded in the past 15 years.

Of course, a big reason was Kansas State’s poor shooting. The Wildcats hit on 31.6 percent from the field, their lowest in three seasons. The Jayhawks have now held the rebounding advantage in all but one game this season.

Syracuse bench makes the difference
Syracuse’s 87-73 win over Providence can best be understood through the lens of bench performance. The Orange average 37.3 points per game off the bench, tops in nation. So they technically underperformed Wednesday with 35 bench points.

Both Dion Waiters (13) and C.J. Fair (12) were in double figures off the bench. Meanwhile, Providence used only six players all game. Brice Kofane was the long player to come off the bench, and he scored just one point.

VCU loses ugly
It wasn’t quite on the level of Towson’s anemic offense, but VCU also had an ugly offensive performance in the CAA on Wednesday. The Rams shot just 27.1 percent in a 55-53 home loss to Georgia State. It marked their worst shooting night since Dec. 1999.

Worse yet, VCU’s starters shot just 16.3 percent (7-for-43) from the field, including 1-for-14 from beyond the arc. Rob Brandenberg and Bradford Burgess combined to go 1-for-25 from the field.

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