SweetSpot: 2014 trade deadline preview

Trade deadline preview: AL Central

July, 6, 2014
Jul 6
11:36
AM ET
We're going division by division to look at what each team needs to do at the trade deadline and what may actually happen. As always, you can keep up with the latest trade talk at Rumor Central.


Chicago White Sox

Status: Selling, but not as much as you'd think.

Biggest needs: Suddenly, the team that annually surprised with how much advanced metrics loved the production of its pitching staff can't buy an out. The White Sox have an admirable one-two combo up front in the rotation, are committed to John Danks and will be rushing Carlos Rodon up the ranks as fast as they usually do, but they have had their lack of pitching depth exposed this season.

General manager Rick Hahn has moved the organization away from big investments in relievers, so the Sox will be looking for potential starters who are close to the majors.

Available for trade: OF Dayan Viciedo (arbitration-eligible in 2015), 1B/DH Adam Dunn (free agent), SS Alexei Ramirez ($10 million in 2015, club option for 2016), 2B Gordon Beckham (third-year arbitration), OF Alejandro De Aza (third-year arbitration), C Tyler Flowers (arbitration-eligible), RP Ronald Belisario (free agent).

The White Sox have no tolerance for long-term rebuilds. The 2013 season is talked about like a war atrocity around these parts, and Hahn & Co. will likely be eyeing contention in 2015. The core is off the table, so forget Chris Sale, Jose Abreu and Jose Quintana and be prepared to have to push hard for Ramirez.

Possible suitors: The Mariners seem perfect. Shortstop Brad Miller has had a terrible season, although he was better in June. They need production from first base and designated hitter, could use a corner outfielder and have solid but not exorbitantly expensive pitching prospects they can spare, particularly James Paxton. The Pirates, Reds and Marlins all could use a shortstop who actually hits on occasion. Jed Lowrie has struggled for the A's, but Oakland would have to work hard to find the minor league pitching to make a Ramirez trade work. The Angels and Yankees could both use some left-handed thunder that Dunn may or may not have in him to provide.

Likely scenario: Against all odds, the Sox seem to be fielding offers for the OK-hitting, wackadoodle-fielding Viciedo. They simply have no reason to keep Dunn for the second half of 2014 and should realize it soon enough, even if it's not until after the waiver deadline. They are under no forced timeline to move Ramirez and still need to decide if any of their infield prospects can replace him. They will need to be blown away to make a deal.

-- James Fegan, The Catbird Seat


Cleveland Indians

Status: On the bubble.

Biggest needs: The Tribe have a big need for starting pitching (because Corey Kluber can't start every day) and a slightly less crucial need for some offensive oomph.

Possible trade targets: SS Asdrubal Cabrera and RHP Justin Masterson, who both become free agents at the end of the season. The Indians were unable to come to terms with Masterson before the season started, and it seems almost certain that he will test the free-agent market. Fans have been placing bets on when Cabrera will be traded since last season.

Up-and-coming prospect Francisco Lindor may not be ready to move up to the show to replace Cabrera, but the Tribe have a strong utilityman in Mike Aviles to fill in at short until Lindor is ready.

Prospect everyone will ask about: Lindor, who is untouchable. Danny Salazar showed enough potential and poise on the mound at the end of 2013 that teams might ask, even though some rough starts this season sent him back to Triple-A Columbus for more seasoning. The Indians and Rays discussed a trade for David Price at the end of 2013, but the Rays' demands started with Salazar (and Carlos Santana). If Cleveland wasn't interested in parting with Salazar then, it doesn't seem likely it would do so now.

Likely scenario: They can't get rid of Masterson unless they get pitching in return, and the set of available starting pitchers who could make an immediate impact consists of guys named David Price. It seems unlikely that the Rays' demands for Price have lessened since December, and Salazar and Santana may not be as interesting anyway. The Indians still look at themselves as possible contenders, so they have to do something to bolster the roster. Cabrera for a DH/power hitter seems most probable.

-- Susan Petrone, It's Pronounced "Lajaway"


Detroit Tigers

Status: All-in.

Biggest needs: The bullpen has been the biggest issue for the Tigers from day one -- and that was before Joe Nathan's struggles began. For the second year in a row, the Tigers will almost certainly be big players in the reliever market. A month ago, shortstop would have been up there on this list, but Eugenio Suarez's emergence has addressed that somewhat. They may still look for a more proven veteran if the opportunity arises, though.

Possible trade targets: Relievers such as Joaquin Benoit and Huston Street of San Diego, Arizona's Brad Ziegler or even Texas' Joakim Soria if the price is right.

Prospect everyone will want but the Tigers won’t want to trade: Now that Nick Castellanos has graduated to the majors, the Tigers' system is short on real blue-chip prospects. Second baseman Devon Travis is one of the best they can offer, and he will be asked about. He's an asset because of his bat; he hit over .350 in Class A and is hitting .291 at Double-A Erie. The Tigers would prefer to keep Travis, but they are an aggressive team when it comes to making moves and won't consider anyone off-limits if the deal works for them.

Likely scenario: The Tigers will probably land a reliever. They've already been linked to Benoit, who the Tigers know well after he spent three years with the club. It probably won't be a huge name or someone regarded as a proven closer, but more likely someone who can help them through the seventh and occasionally eighth inning.

-- Grey Papke, Walkoff Woodward


Kansas City Royals

Status: All-in as they try to catch the Tigers or win a wild card for their first postseason appearance since 1985.

Biggest needs: Power. The Royals are last in the American League in home runs, and Raul Ibanez is unlikely to be the answer. Trouble is, whom do you bump? Right field, where Norichika Aoki failed to do the job and is currently on the DL, is the obvious hole, but first baseman Eric Hosmer has four home runs and DH Billy Butler has two, so the Royals need to at least consider upgrading those positions.

Possible trade targets: OF Marlon Byrd, DH Adam Dunn, 1B/DH Chris Carter, OF Dayan Viciedo, DH Kendrys Morales.

Prospect everyone will ask about: RHP Kyle Zimmer, the team's top prospect heading into the season, has yet to pitch because of a muscle strain in his shoulder. Shortstop Raul Mondesi Jr. was a top-50 prospect before the season but has struggled in high Class A, hitting .216. But he is 18 and the Royals won't give up on him just yet.

Likely scenario: While Byrd would be the best fit, he is signed through next season with a 2016 option, and even an $8 million future salary may scare off the Royals. Dunn and Carter, with their high strikeout rates, aren't Royals type of players, although Dunn has been good enough to at least warrant consideration. Don't be surprised if the Royals stand pat and just hope Hosmer and Butler start hitting.

-- David Schoenfield


Minnesota Twins

Status: Selling and retooling.

Trade targets for other teams: OF Josh Willingham (free agent), 1B/DH Kendrys Morales (free agent), SP Kevin Correia (free agent), C Kurt Suzuki (free agent).

Possible suitors: Any team needing a bat could take an interest in Willingham, who has shown good power and patience at the plate and might be one of the best bats available at the deadline, though his age and lack of mobility in left field will limit his return. Morales is a big name who would be an interesting pickup for some team if he heats up a little.

What they need: Young, talented players. The Twins are looking to rebuild internally, and any quality prospects who could aid the arrival of Byron Buxton, Miguel Sano, Alex Meyer and others would be welcomed.

Likely scenario: The Twins flip Willingham and maybe another expiring veteran for a couple B-level prospects.

-- Nick Nelson, Twins Daily
We're going division by division to look at what each team needs to do at the trade deadline and what may actually happen. As always, you can keep up with the latest trade talk at Rumor Central.


Chicago Cubs

Status: Moving parts to build the farm. Friday night's trade of Jeff Samardzija and Jason Hammel to the A's removed two of the biggest names that were available.

Biggest needs: Right now the Cubs have enjoyed some recent success, sporting a four-game win streak that included a sweep over the defending champion Boston Red Sox. However, it’s important to remember where this team is in the rebuilding process. Right now their biggest need is minor league talent, regardless of position, but with an emphasis on near major league-ready starting pitching. They didn't get that with Addison Russell, the 20-year-old shortstop in Double-A, but he was too talented to pass up.

Other possible trade chips: With the blockbuster deal with the A's, the Cubs' available pieces have been considerably depleted. There are still names on the roster that can be had, but they aren't impact players. Guys like Nate Schierholtz, Darwin Barney and Carlos Villanueva are all available, but all figure to be role players designed to help a team fill out the back part of a roster.

The future: The Cubs now have a logjam in the infield, with Starlin Castro, Javier Baez and Russell all capable of playing shortstop. You can eventually move one to second base and one to third, but Kris Bryant is also there at third. Since being drafted with the fourth overall pick in the 2013 draft, Bryant has been a freak of nature with the bat and has accelerated quickly through the system. The rise has been so fast and the success so big (.357, 29 home runs between Double-A and Triple-A) that a lot of Cub fans have begun to wonder if Bryant could see Wrigley this season. It will be interesting to see how all this works itself out and if Baez or Castro will eventually be used to acquire pitching.

-- Joe Aiello, The View from the Bleachers



Cincinnati Reds

Status: Bargain shoppers.

Biggest needs: The Reds are tenth in the National League in runs scored, so upgrading the offense should be the first priority for GM Walt Jocketty. Shortstop has been the least productive position, but at least Zack Cozart has been playing elite defense. Cincinnati would be better served trying to land a left fielder to replace the three-headed Ryan Ludwick/ Chris Heisey/ Skip Schumaker combination. The Reds also need to find an effective relief pitcher or two, as the bullpen has been one of the worst in the league, by almost any measure.

Possible trade targets: OF Seth Smith, OF Matt Joyce; a seventh-inning-type bullpen arm.

That prospect everyone will want but the Reds won’t want to trade: RHP Ben Lively tore through the California League before his promotion to Double-A Pensacola, posting a 10-1 record with a 2.28 ERA, 95 strikeouts, and only 16 walks in 13 starts. He has a live arm, and stands a good chance of competing for a spot in Cincinnati's rotation at some point in 2015.

Likely scenario: Seth Smith, an impending free agent, would look good in red and white, but it has been a long time since Jocketty took any direct action to improve the Reds by bringing in real talent from outside the organization. The most likely scenario, frankly, is that budget constraints and lack of trade bait cause him to continue sitting on his hands. Look for the Reds to seek to land a set-up reliever, possibly a lefty in light of Sean Marshall's continuing injury problems.

-- Chad Dotson, Redleg Nation



Milwaukee Brewers

Status: Trying to lock up the NL Central.

Biggest needs: The Brewers opened play on Saturday with a four-game lead over the Cardinals in the NL Central, which was tied for the largest lead in any division. They've done it by getting contributions from up and down the roster, so there really aren't a lot of big holes to fill here. The main areas of need are the bench, specifically a left-handed power bat who can play first base or a corner outfield spot and a utility infielder who can play short and third. They could also possibly use a right-handed reliever for setup.

Possible trade targets: OF Nate Schierholtz; 1B Adam Dunn; IF Kelly Johnson; RP Koji Uehara.

The untouchables: The Brewers' much-maligned farm system has taken a significant step forward this year, headlined by the breakout performance of starter Jimmy Nelson in Triple-A. Down in A-ball, OF Tyrone Taylor, SS Orlando Arcia and C Clint Coulter are having the kinds of seasons that would make them attractive players to ask for in trade. That being said, it's hard to imagine them giving up any of these players to fill these second- and third-tier needs the team has to fill.

What probably won't happen ... but might: Brewers owner Mark Attanasio and general manager Doug Melvin haven't been shy about making big, splashy moves when contending in the past, so we shouldn't completely rule out the earth-shattering blockbuster. The Brewers did send a scout to watch a recent David Price start, and he would give them the obvious ace that their more balanced rotation lacks. It's not likely because they could easily be outbid by teams with better systems and they don't really need to do it, but don't rule it out.

What probably will happen: Melvin has talked quite a bit in the local media about his desire to add a right-handed reliever who can pitch late in games, so unless either Tyler Thornburg or Jim Henderson get healthy over the next month something will probably happen on this front. Despite some recent protestations from Melvin that they don't have big needs for bats, it's hard to see them standing completely pat without adding at least one player who can hit off the bench.

-- Ryan Topp, Disciples of Uecker



Pittsburgh Pirates

Status: After a slow start, they're back in it. Since May, the Pirates are tied with the A's for the best record in the majors.

Biggest needs: Starting rotation. The rotation has been better since May 2, but even then the 3.90 ERA is just ninth in the National League. Among position players, first base remains the biggest hole, as Pirates first basemen (mostly Ike Davis) have been worth 1.4 wins below average. They already made the Jason Grilli-Ernesto Frieri trade but could use another bullpen arm for depth.

Possible trade targets: SP A.J. Burnett ($15 million mutual option or $7.5 million player option for 2015); 1B Justin Morneau ($6.75 million in 2015); SP Jon Lester (free agent); SP David Price (under team control for one more season); RP Chad Qualls ($3 million in 2015); RP Tony Sipp.

Likely scenario: Jeff Locke and Vance Worley have helped solidify the rotation of late with Francisco Liriano on the DL, but you probably can't rely on those two to keep this up (although Locke's walk rate has been much improved from last season). The rotation is OK enough that it makes sense for the Pirates to only go after one of the big guns -- which means Price or Lester, now that the Cubs traded Jeff Samardzija and Jason Hammel. The Pirates have pitching prospects like Nick Kingham and Tyler Glasnow that are certainly interesting, but the Pirates have to get closer to the Brewers before management would consider such a big trade and added salary. As for first base, maybe Clint Hurdle should see if super utility guy Josh Harrison could handle the position to at least platoon with Davis.

In the end, the Pirates probably stick with what they have and hope Liriano and Gerrit Cole have better second halves and that one of Locke or Worley manages to hold his own.

-- David Schoenfield



St. Louis Cardinals

Status: Chasing the Brewers while in the thick of the wild-card race.

Biggest needs: It's easy to point to the rotation now that Michael Wacha and Jaime Garcia are on the disabled list, but the offense is just 13th in the NL in runs while ranking last in home runs. Second base has been a disaster, with a combined line of .201/.268/.260.

Possible trade targets: SP David Price; SP Jon Lester; 2B Aaron Hill ($12 million per year in 2015 and 2016); 2B/OF Ben Zobrist ($7.5 million in 2015); 3B Martin Prado ($11 million in 2015 and 2016).

The big chip: OF Oscar Taveras remains one of baseball's top prospects, despite a lackluster .196 mark in 15 games with the Cardinals earlier this season (he's hit .318/.370/.502 in Triple-A).

Likely scenario: The Cardinals and Dodgers remain the two teams most often tied to Price, largely because they have quality and depth in the farm system to deal from. A lot depends on the prognosis of Wacha; if he can't come back, the Cardinals are more likely to go after Price or maybe Lester if he becomes available. That said, Kolten Wong and Mark Ellis haven't produced at second and that could be filled much easier (Matt Carpenter can always move back there if they go after a third baseman like Prado). Either way, considering the ages of guys like Yadier Molina, Matt Holliday, Adam Wainwright and Allen Craig, there's some imperative for St. Louis to make a deal this year.

--David Schoenfield
We're going division by division to look at what each team needs to do at the trade deadline and what may actually happen. As always, you can keep up with the latest trade talk at Rumor Central.


Baltimore Orioles

Status: All in. Despite all that has gone wrong in the first -- the struggles of Chris Davis and Manny Machado, poor results from Chris Tillman and Ubaldo Jimenez, Matt Wieters' season-ending injury -- the Orioles are right there with the Blue Jays.

Biggest needs: Tillman and Jimenez were supposed to headline the rotation but are a combined 10-12, both with ERAs over 4.00. It's not just Camden Yards as both have poor strikeout-to-walk rates. So you'd think the top priority would be landing a starting pitcher. If the O's are willing to trade Dylan Bundy, they could probably land Jeff Samardzija (the Rays are unlikely to deal David Price to a division rival). Second base has been a problem all season with a .277 OBP. Jonathan Schoop has 56 strikeouts and seven walks while Ryan Flaherty is best suited for utility role. Steve Pearce has been hot of late so the need for a left fielder isn't the same as a few weeks ago. They could also look to add a closer or, if they're comfortable with Zach Britton there, a setup guy to pair with Darren O'Day.

Possible trade targets: Jason Hammel has succeeded before in Baltimore and the way he's pitching with the Cubs would make him the No. 1 starter in Baltimore. There are several second basemen who may available: Aaron Hill of the Diamondbacks, although he comes with a contract through 2016 at $12 million per year; Ben Zobrist of the Rays; Martin Prado of the D-backs can also play second; Daniel Murphy may be the best guy out there if the Mets decide to deal him. Huston Street could is an option for the ninth, pushing Britton into a lefty-righty setup role with O'Day.

Prospect everyone will ask about: Bundy has now made three rehab starts in short-season Class A with 22 strikeouts and three walks. That doesn't tell us a whole lot but the reports have been good. It's possible he could be ready to contribute by mid-August, but would the Orioles be ready to trust him? And then there's Kevin Gausman, who the O's keep shuffling back and forth between the majors and minors. They won't want to trade Bundy or Gausman, and conceivably could go with the youngsters alongside Tillman, Jimenez, Wei-Yin Chen and/or Bud Norris. Schoo could be dangled.

Likely scenario: The Orioles will do something, that's almost guaranteed. The AL East is too ripe for the taking to stand pat. They'll be battling the Blue Jays for the same group of starting pitchers. Knowing their history with Hammel, that seems like a strong possibility. If not Street, expect minor pickups for the bullpen and maybe a lefty outfield bat to platoon with Pearce since David Lough is hitting under .200.

-- David Schoenfield


Boston Red Sox

Status: On the bubble.

Biggest needs: The Red Sox outfield has been among baseball's worst in 2014, and the club surely needs to add another bat to the mix if it has any hope of contending in the AL. Boston has especially had problems against right-handed pitching (though the Sox offense has'’t hit lefties well either). Adding a lefty bat to replace the injured Shane Victorino or fill in periodically for the struggling Jackie Bradley Jr. is the move GM Ben Cherington is most likely to make if he chooses to upgrade Boston's major league roster.

Possible trade targets: OF Will Venable; OF Gerardo Parra; another available outfield bat.

If the Red Sox can’t find a way to win some games over the next couple of weeks, Cherington could also look to sell off some of Boston's pieces, though the GM remains adamant the team can still contend in 2014.

Likely scenario: The Red Sox make a minor move for an outfield bat but still can't climb into legitimate contention in the AL East as the offense continues to struggle. Cherington sells off some of the team’s veterans -- players such as Jake Peavy, A.J. Pierzynski, Felix Doubront, Stephen Drew and even Koji Uehara are all shipped elsewhere -- while holding onto bigger pieces like Jon Lester and John Lackey (and hope to re-sign Lester after the season). Boston adds young talent at the deadline, makes room on the major league roster for some of its talented prospects down in Triple-A, and gears up for another run in 2015.

-- Alex Skillin, Fire Brand of the AL



New York Yankees

Status: Buying (by default).

Biggest needs: The problem that presents itself is that the Yankees are in need of a great many things, but don't necessarily have the pieces to acquire those things. On top of that, they have very little roster flexibility, unless they start axing vets like Brian Roberts, Ichiro Suzuki and Alfonso Soriano. Of those many needs, though, the biggest is in the starting rotation. No one has any idea how CC Sabathia will be when he returns from the disabled list and counting on Michael Pineda to pitch again this year, let alone be effective, seems like a risky proposition at best. Additionally, with Ivan Nova out for the year, three-fifths of the rotation -- David Phelps, Vidal Nuno and Chase Whitley -- is of the "just-keep-the-team-in-the-game" variety and that's not going to propel the Yankees into the playoffs, mediocre AL East or not.

Possible trade targets: We've seen the Yankees linked to the big names like Cliff Lee and David Price, as well as "lesser" targets like Jeff Samardzjia and Jason Hammel.

Potential trade chips: The shine is off the apple of a lot of Yankee prospects, like the oft-injured Slade Heathcott and the under-performing Mason Williams and Tyler Austin. Catchers Gary Sanchez and John Ryan Murphy, who impressed with his cup of coffee this season, could be interesting pieces in a trade, but it's likely that the Yankees don't have the prospect package to land a big name.

Likely scenario: The Yankees trade for Jason Hammel or someone like him: A mid-rotation arm to take the pressure off the Phelps-Nuno-Whitely troika while Sabathia slides back into the rotation.

-- Matt Imbrogno, It's About The Money



Tampa Bay Rays

Status: Should be selling, despite the recent hot streak.

Trade targets for other teams: 2B Ben Zobrist (2015 team option), David Price (controlled through 2015), Matt Joyce (arbitration eligible), Grant Balfour (under contract through 2015).

Possible suitors: The Dodgers were rumored to be interested in Price during this past offseason and could use Zobrist's flexibility for insurance at multiple positions. The surprising play of Kevin Kiermaier and Brandon Guyer lead to a crowded depth chart in the outfield as David DeJesus and Wil Myers return from injury, making Joyce a trade possibility for teams looking for a left-handed bat or outfield depth such as the Angels, Athletics, Giants or Brewers.

What they need: Tampa Bay needs to address the upper levels of the minors to restock the cupboard for the next couple of years. Starting pitching would be a primary need to replace Price and make up for the loss of Matt Moore as he works his way back from Tommy John surgery. The team has two middle infielders in Zobrist and Yunel Escobar that are on the other side of 30 that have lost a step or two this season after excelling in 2013 and have two fringe players in Hak-Ju Lee and Cole Figueroa as the next men up on the depth chart. The bullpen is long in the tooth with Balfour and Peralta, and a MLB-ready catcher to add to the 40-man roster would be helpful.

Likely scenario: Price is traded for a high-profile pitching prospect and an outfield prospect. Joyce is traded for near-ready bullpen help. Given the front office strongly believed in the potential of the 2014 team, they could also keep all of their pieces and make one more push for the postseason in 2015.

-- Jason Collette, The Process Report


Toronto Blue Jays

Status: All in.

Biggest needs: The Blue Jays are currently 17th in MLB in starting pitching ERA. The Jays' rotation consists of two soft-tossers, a journeyman lefty and two 23-year olds. Toronto needs a power arm, a workhorse who can put an end to losing streaks and take the pressure off youngsters Drew Hutchison and Marcus Stroman. As well, the Blue Jays could use an upgrade at second base and pitching depth in the bullpen.

Possible trade targets: SP Jeff Samardzija, SP David Price, SP James Shields, SP Jason Hammel, SP Justin Masterson, SP Cole Hamels, 3B Chase Headley, 2B Chase Utley, 2B Daniel Murphy, 2B Ben Zobrist.

That prospect everyone will want but the Blue Jays won't want to trade: SP Aaron Sanchez is ranked by both ESPN's Keith Law and Baseball America as being the Blue Jays' No. 1 prospect -- and for good reason. The 22-year old right-handed pitcher possesses a power arm with a fastball that averages a tick above 95 mph. Before being promoted to Triple-A Buffalo, Sanchez averaged 7.8 strikeouts per nine innings pitched and induced 3.3 groundballs for every fly ball. With that said, command of his pitches is an issue. He's walked 5.5 for every nine innings this season.

Likely scenario: It is doubtful that the Rays would trade Price within the division, or that the Blue Jays would part with a package deep enough to acquire him. With the Royals flirting with first place in the AL Central, they're not going to trade Shields. The Jays will trade for a lower-tier arm such as Hammel, Jonathon Niese, Ian Kennedy or even the prodigal son A.J. Burnett. As for the gap at second base, Martin Prado would fill it nicely.

-- Callum Hughson, mopupduty.com, @callumhughson
We're going division by division to look at what each team needs to do at the trade deadline and what may actually happen. As always, you can keep up with the latest trade talk at Rumor Central.


Atlanta Braves

Status: Adding role players, bench and bullpen.

Biggest needs: The Braves' biggest need is to get rid of Dan Uggla's salary (due $13 million next year), but that's not happening. Atlanta is set in the starting lineup and rotation, but will look to add another setup man in the bullpen for Craig Kimbrel. The Braves also will look to improve what has been a weak bench (.193 pinch-hitting average).

Possible trade targets: David Price and Jeff Samardzija are most likely out of the Braves' prospect price range. Atlanta's system doesn't have enough depth to pull off a major trade, while still leaving some top guys for the home team. Look for small trades with minor prospects involved.

The prospect everyone will want but the Braves won't trade: Jose Peraza is hitting .341/.369/.454, and is 40-for-49 in stolen base attempts. He was just promoted to Double-A, and hasn't slowed down at the plate or on the bases. For a team like the Braves that needs a leadoff man with speed, they won't be trading the best one who has come through their system in more than a decade.

Likely scenario: The Braves will add a reliever and a pinch hitter. To make room on the bench they will finally release Uggla and eat the rest of his salary.

--Martin Gandy, Chop County


Miami Marlins

Status: Sitting tight, mostly. At 41-43, the Marlins aren't out of the playoff race but seem unlikely to make a run.

Biggest needs: If they do hang in there, they'll need to upgrade a rotation still suffering from the loss of Jose Fernandez. They've given a combined 22 starts to the likes of Jacob Turner, Anthony DeSclafani, Randy Wolf, Brad Hand and Kevin Slowey, all of whom have ERAs over 5.00. Top prospect Andrew Heaney may help, although he has a 5.17 ERA through his first three major league starts. They're fine at the back end of the bullpen with Steve Cishek, but could add some depth there.

If they fall back over the next month, they could try to cash in on Casey McGehee, who has a .312 average and 49 RBIs but just one home run. He'd make a nice bench player for a contending team. Cishek is a remote possibility to be traded as he has entered his arbitration years and will start to get expensive next year (he's making $3.8 million this year). With teams such as the Tigers and Giants possibly seeking a closer, he could bring a nice return, but the Marlins would likely wait until the offseason.

Possible trade targets/chips: The back of the rotation has been so bad that even a mediocre back-end starter would be an upgrade. For example, a pitcher such as Philadelphia's Roberto Hernandez, who is making just $4.5 million and signed through this year, making him a perfect Marlins rental. Seattle needs a right-handed bat and could use McGehee to play first base or DH. Nick Franklin has worn out his welcome in Seattle; the Mariners probably wouldn't do that straight up but the Marlins could toss in a minor leaguer.

Likely scenario: Probably not much happens here. They won't be close enough to make a significant deal and won't be far enough behind to start selling. McGehee could be an August deal.

--David Schoenfield


New York Mets

Team status: Aiming towards the cellar.
Fans status: Bye-ers.

Biggest needs: Cash. Shake Shack restaurant patrons. A young, promising shortstop might be nice. Minor league hitting prospects, at any position.

Possibly coveted goods: AARP card-carrying members Bartolo Colon and Bobby Abreu are two veterans having steady years who could be of value to a pennant-contending team. But what can they fetch in return? A Class A reliever? Projectable 20-year-old outfielder? The Mets would love to have someone take Chris Young off their hands, but he's below the Mendoza Line and has a $7.25 million salary. Jonathon Niese and Daniel Murphy are two players in the midst of perhaps their best seasons, but may be worth more to the Mets than other teams. Murphy is due a raise in the winter and could be on the block, at the risk of a fan revolt.

Likely scenario: Mets stand pat. After talking in March about a 90-win season, the Mets can't be sellers. But at 11 games below .500, they can't be buyers, either. They're paralyzed by enormous debt, dwindling attendance, and placating an impatient New York fan base. In the Catch-22 position of needing fans for revenue and not having enough money to take on more payroll, any trade they make will be driven by either cutting salary or making a big, newsy splash to remain relevant in minds of fans looking forward to preseason football. Bet on inertia.

--Joe Janish, MetsToday.com, @metstoday on Twitter


Philadelphia Phillies

Status: Should be selling, but the front office hasn't yet admitted that a complete overhaul needs to begin.

Biggest needs: Young talent. Prospects. Pitching. Outfielders. Middle infielders under 35. A catcher and first baseman.

Possible trade chips: If this is going to be an interesting trade deadline season, a lot will revolve around what the Phillies decide to do. Of course, keep in mind that if they had a lot of great players they wouldn't be 12 games under .500, so the trade value of players other than Cole Hamels (not going anywhere) and Cliff Lee (maybe, once he comes of the DL and proves he's healthy) is pretty minimal.

Chase Utley is signed through next season with vesting options that run through 2019. Teams will ask about him but Utley has indicated he will not waive his 10-and-5 rights to approve a trade. So he's not going anywhere.

Jimmy Rollins will likely meet his 2015 vesting option, which means he'll earn $11 million next year. He had a .288 OBP in June and probably wouldn't bring much in return anyway. Besides, which contenders even need a shortstop? Eugenio Suarez has played well since his call-up for the Tigers, Brad Miller has been hitting for the Mariners after a terrible first two months and the Yankees aren't going to displace Derek Jeter. Would the Dodgers want Rollins and slide Hanley Ramirez over to third? Not likely.

The two Phillies most likely to be traded are right fielder Marlon Byrd (.267/.320/.491 and signed through 2015 with a 2016 vesting option for $8 million) and Roberto Hernandez. Byrd is a perfect fit for Seattle, which needs a right-handed corner outfielder. Hernandez isn't great but would be a cheap option for a team that may eventually need a fifth starter (Oakland, Seattle, Baltimore, Miami, Cleveland). A.J. Burnett could be flipped -- back to Pittsburgh? -- but has been inconsistent so probably wouldn't bring more than a couple of Class A prospects.

Likely scenario: Ruben Amaro Jr. doesn't know what to do and holds on to everything, save Hernandez. He'll want too much for Lee and won't find a taker for Rollins. He should try to deal Byrd and Burnett and at least start the restocking of the farm system, but the Phillies have made it clear that they fear losing fans if they start selling. But they're already losing fans: Attendance is down 14,000 per game from just two years ago.

-- David Schoenfield


Washington Nationals

Status: Holding.

Biggest needs: With the return of Bryce Harper, the Nationals are finally fielding their projected starting lineup for the first time since Opening Day, when catcher Wilson Ramos broke his hand. The Nationals are fifth in the majors in rotation ERA (but have a 2.60 ERA since June 1), second in bullpen ERA and the lineup is healthy. There isn't much for them to do. They may look to add a bench player/pinch-hitter type as neither Nate McLouth nor Kevin Frandsen have produced much, but that's a minor priority. The bullpen has been terrific, although lefty Jerry Blevins hasn't been effective (16 walks in 29 2/3 innings).

Likely scenario: Unless a starting pitcher gets hurt, don't expect the Nationals to do much except maybe look for a lefty reliever.

--David Schoenfield
Over the next six days, we will go division by division and look at what each team needs to do at the trade deadline and what may actually happen. As always, you can keep up with the latest trade talk at Rumor Central.


Houston Astros

Status: Selling anyone older than 30.

Trade targets for other teams: OF Dexter Fowler (arbitration eligible, although he just landed on the DL), RP Chad Qualls ($3 million in 2015, team option in 2016), RP Tony Sipp (arb-eligible).

Possible suitors: Fowler's upcoming arbitration, coming on the heels of a 116 OPS+ season, might be too pricey for the rebuilding Astros. The Giants (with Angel Pagan out indefinitely with back issues) and Red Sox (still waiting for Jackie Bradley Jr. to get it together) could use upgrades and stability in center field.

When you are headed toward 95 or more losses, relievers are expendable and easily replaceable. Qualls and Sipp are the most marketable. Qualls has a ridiculous 9-1 strikeout-to-walk ratio in 28 1/3 innings, while Sipp has held lefties to a .283 OPS in 22 1/3 innings. Toronto could certainly use Sipp as a second lefty in the pen. Qualls might step right in as a closer for the always-in-flux Tigers or suddenly struggling Giants.

What they need: Restocking the farm system, which has recently graduated Jonathan Singleton, George Springer and Domingo Santana.

Likely scenario: Qualls and Sipp find new homes by mid-July, and Fowler stays with Astros through the end of 2014.

-- Diane Firstman, Value Over Replacement Grit


Los Angeles Angels

Status: Buying.

Biggest needs: A reliable late-innings reliever, aka baseball's unicorn. Despite throwing the fourth-fewest innings of any American League bullpen, the club's relief corps still holds claim to the league's worst WAR (-0.6). The Angels already added Jason Grilli and Rich Hill to the bullpen mix in the past week (and jettisoned Ernesto Frieri), but those moves serve more as window dressing than anything else, so a bigger trade is likely in the offing. There's some chatter about the Halos adding a starter of the Jason Hammel or Ian Kennedy variety, but the pen is the bigger need at the moment. The Angels could also go for an upgrade at third base, where David Freese and friends have combined to put up an AL-worst .265 wOBA, but that's a need more likely filled over the winter.

Possible trade targets: Relievers Huston Street, Joaquin Benoit or Joakim Soria, a midrotation starter with some team control remaining and maybe a platoon partner for Freese.

Potential trade chips: Grant Green? Alex Yarbrough? Some other middle-of-the-road prospect? The reason the Angels are highly unlikely to be involved in the David Price and Jeff Samardzija sweepstakes is they really don't have much to entice potential trade partners. C.J. Cron could have been a valuable piece to dangle in front of teams needing power (hello, San Diego!), but he's likely off the table now that Raul Ibanez is out of the picture.

Likely scenario: The Angels acquire Street or Benoit from the Padres for a package that includes one of the team's many second-base prospects who are in (or close) to the majors (e.g., Green, Yarbrough or Taylor Lindsey), giving San Diego an option at the keystone that will distract fans from the total implosion of Jedd Gyorko.

-- Nate Aderhold, Halos Daily


Oakland Athletics

Status: All-in. The A's lead the AL in runs scored and are second in fewest runs allowed.

Biggest needs: Second base has been the obvious black hole on offense, with a combined .228/.296/.266 line, 27th in the majors in wOBA. As scrappy as Eric Sogard and Nick Punto may be, even the best lineup in the league could improve.

The other obvious area to address would be the rotation, which has been terrific but has also been progressively worse each month. Sonny Gray and Jesse Chavez have never pitched an entire season in a big league rotation, and Scott Kazmir hasn't pitched more than 158 innings since 2007. With Drew Pomeranz currently on the DL, Triple-A vet Brad Mills has been starting.

Possible trade targets: If Billy Beane wants to deal, there are plenty of second basemen potentially out there -- Aaron Hill, Daniel Murphy, Ben Zobrist, Chase Utley (although he can veto any deal) and Gordon Beckham. A couple of former A's starters would also be nice fits -- Brandon McCarthy and Bartolo Colon.

Possible trade chips: Shortstop Addison Russell, back after missing the first two months with a hamstring problem, isn't going anywhere, but the Oakland system is otherwise thin at the upper levels. Outfielder Billy McKinney, the team's first-round pick in 2013, and shortstop Daniel Robertson are young and holding their own for Stockton in the high Class A California League. Teams will ask about those two, but Beane won't want to trade them. First baseman Matt Olson has slugged 23 home runs for Stockton although he's hitting just .249.

Likely scenario: The A's are always constrained by their payroll, so guys like Hill and Colon may not fit due to their salaries. Beane will undoubtedly do something, but it's more likely to be a minor pickup or a higher salaried guy after the July 31 nonwaiver trade deadline. For example, in 2012, he acquired Stephen Drew in August.

-- David Schoenfield


Seattle Mariners

Status: Buying. Yes, Mariners fans, you're in a playoff race.

Biggest needs: A right-handed corner outfield bat -- Mariners left fielders (mostly Dustin Ackley) are hitting .226/.278/.334. Ackley has fared a little better against left-handers, not that he's hit either side. With Corey Hart and Justin Smoak both on the DL, the Mariners have been using the likes of John Buck, Endy Chavez and Willie Bloomquist at first base or DH. Considering Hart and Smoak didn't hit when they were in the lineup, a first base/DH-type is also a possibility.

The rotation has the second-best ERA in the AL, and even though Taijuan Walker just made his season debut, the Mariners could go after a starter. Chris Young has been a pleasant surprise with his 3.15 ERA, but his FIP is 4.99 and he hasn't made it through an entire season since 2007. And Roenis Elias slots best as a back-end starter, not a No. 3.

Possible trade targets: All available outfielders will be enticing -- Josh Willingham, Marlon Byrd, Michael Cuddyer and maybe Alex Rios (the Mariners and Rangers made a midseason trade with Cliff Lee back in the day). With the Twins having fallen back in the AL Central, bringing back Kendrys Morales is a possibility, although he hasn't hit in 21 games with Minnesota. On the pitching front, the usual suspects will be mentioned: Kennedy, Hammel, McCarthy. But what about Colon? He is signed through 2015, but if the Mets decide to deal him, he would be an attractive target for a lot of teams.

Possible trade chips: It will be difficult for the Mariners to get one of the better starters since they don't have much in the way of prospects in the upper minors, unless you include Walker or the injured James Paxton. Nick Franklin is the one guy they have, but his poor performance of late (.221 in Triple-A in June) hasn't helped his value. It seems unlikely they would trade Walker now that he's apparently over his early-season shoulder issues (keep fingers crossed).

Likely scenario: They have to acquire at least one bat, and an impending free agent like Willingham wouldn't cost a top prospect. Byrd, signed through next season at a reasonable rate, would be more expensive but is better. The next few weeks will us tell a lot about Elias, Young and Walker and whether Seattle will need to reinforce the rotation.

-- David Schoenfield


Texas Rangers

Status: Actively listening to offers.

Possible trade targets: RF Alex Rios ($13.5 million team option for 2015), 3B Adrian Beltre ($18 million for 2015, team option for 2016), RP Joakim Soria ($7 million team option for 2015), RP Neal Cotts (free agent), SS Elvis Andrus (under team control through 2018).

Possible suitors: Rios and Beltre could be considered by teams that feel they are one player away from being over the top. Given the value Beltre offers to the Rangers, a team would be hard-pressed to put together any kind of package that would satisfy Jon Daniels & Co., especially with the running belief that, with better health, the club can contend in 2015. Rios might be more of a possibility, as the Rangers have Michael Choice, Engel Beltre and a few others in the pipeline who might be outfield options in the near future.

Soria and Cotts would seem to be the most likely to be dealt, as this is the time of year that contending teams start looking for late-inning bullpen help. I don't foresee a team putting together any kind of legitimate package for Andrus, who the Rangers developed and signed to a long-term deal.

What they need: Depth on the farm has become somewhat of an issue, especially on the pitching front, after the various trades in recent years have filtered out some of the depth. The Rangers will likely look to find some future starting pitching in any deal, but a high-upside offensive prospect isn't out of the question.

Likely scenario: Cotts would be the one guy I could see getting moved at the deadline, with the possibility of Soria as well. Rios remains a remote possibility, but as for the other guys, I can't envision the Rangers parting ways with Andrus, Beltre or Darvish, no matter how bad things have been in 2014.

-- Brandon Land, One Strike Away
Over the next six days we'll go by division-by-division and look at what each team needs to do at the trade deadline ... and what may actually happen. As always, you can keep up with the latest trade talk at Rumor Central.


Arizona Diamondbacks

Status: Selling veterans to retool for 2015.

Trade targets for other teams: Brandon McCarthy (free agent this winter); Brad Ziegler ($5 million in 2015, team option for 2016); Oliver Perez ($2.5 million in 2015); Didi Gregorius (under team control through at least 2018); Aaron Hill ($12 million each for 2015 and 2016); Martin Prado ($11 million each for 2015 and 2016).

Possible suitors: Several teams including the Yankees and Athletics could be interested in McCarthy. Despite his 5.11 ERA, he's had outstanding peripherals (2.92 xFIP), which suggests better days ahead. Just about every contender would love to add Ziegler, whose ground ball ways make him an ideal late-inning fireman in double play situations. And many teams will also have an eye on the steady and reasonably priced Perez.

While GM Kevin Towers is reportedly loathe to trade away young shortstops Gregorius, Chris Owings or Nick Ahmed, any one of the three could be moved in the right deal (to the Mets, for catcher Kevin Plawecki?). Arizona would eat money to move Hill's contract to free up second base for one of its shortstops (back to Toronto, for pitcher John Stilson?), and teams like the Royals and Angels getting questionable production from third base might consider Prado, who doubles as injury protection at second.

What they need: Young pitching with upside is Arizona's main priority, but the team also seeks young outfielders with pop. And after moving 2012 first rounder Stryker Trahan off catcher in the spring, the D-backs' dearth of minor league catching could also cause them to target an A-ball heir apparent for Miguel Montero.

Likely scenario: McCarthy, Ziegler and Perez all get moved. Odds are against a trade of Hill, Prado or one of the D-backs' shortstops.
--Ryan P. Morrison, Inside the 'Zona


Colorado Rockies

Status: Too injured to know where they stand or move much.

Trade targets for other teams: C Wilin Rosario (eligible for arbitration for first time this winter), SS Troy Tulowitzki (signed through 2019 at $20 million per year), OF Drew Stubbs (final arbitration in 2015), SP Jorge De La Rosa (free agent this winter), RP LaTroy Hawkins (2015 team options).

Possible suitors: The Rockies would have more suitors if half of their team wasn't on the disabled list.

Rosario's bat hasn't outweighed concerns about his glove. He might attract interest from a team that needs a DH who can catch such as the Orioles. De La Rosa hasn't been all that shiny in over a month. That being said, he's better than what the Yankees have used lately in their rotation. Hawkins is a luxury the Rockies don't really need but he could help the Angels or the Tigers.

Most contenders can't afford the prospects to acquire Tulowitzki, but the Dodgers or Blue Jays could get creative if they moved their current shortstops. Don't discount the A's from making a move reminiscent of their Matt Holliday rental. Drew Stubbs is likely to be flipped because of his salary and Corey Dickerson asserting his authority. Stubbs could go to the Giants, who may be need a center fielder with Angel Pagan injured.

What they need: A young defense-first catcher and either corner infield or pitching prospects.

Likely scenario: Stubbs and De La Rosa are victims of a roster crunch and Rosario changes roles as well as scenery. Expect more drama from waiver-wire deals then from the deadline deals. The worse their July is, the crazier the post-deadline deals will be. The Rockies gamble Tulowitzki stays healthy and try again in 2015.
--Richard Bergstrom, RockiesZingers


Los Angeles Dodgers

Status: All in.

Biggest needs: Using wins above average, the Dodgers' worst position has been catcher, but that's partially due to all the time A.J. Ellis has missed. They could use an infielder, maybe a shortstop to hedge against Hanley Ramirez's minor injuries, or to move Ramirez to third to get a better defender up the middle. The bullpen has been better of late, with the second-best ERA in the majors in June, so that concern has lessened. And they're one of the few teams that has the high-end prospects to acquire David Price.

Possible trade targets: LHP David Price; SS Stephen Drew if the Red Sox continue to struggle; maybe a bullpen arm.

That prospect everyone will want but the Dodgers won’t want to trade: OF Joc Pederson is hitting .319/.437/.568 at Triple-A with 17 home runs, although he slowed down in June (.270, two home runs) after hitting .398 in April and slugging nine home runs in May. Still, he may eventually be playing center field for the Dodgers come August.

Likely scenario: As enticing as adding Price to Clayton Kershaw and Zack Greinke sounds, the Dodgers will resist the temptation and keep Pederson and Class A shortstop Corey Seager. Of course, cancel all bets if Josh Beckett or Hyun-Jin Ryu get injured. Most likely, the Dodgers add a reliever -- maybe a second lefty to go with J.P. Howell -- and eventually make center field a Pederson/Scott Van Slyke platoon, with Andre Ethier coming off the bench and Carl Crawford languishing somewhere if he ever gets healthy.
--David Schoenfield


San Diego Padres

Status: Selling anyone and anything.

Trade targets for other teams:
OF Seth Smith (free agent this winter); 3B Chase Headley (free agent); RP Huston Street ($7 million team option for 2015); RP Joaquin Benoit ($8 million in 2015, team option for 2016); OF Chris Denorfia (free agent); SP Ian Kennedy (under team control through 2015).

Possible suitors: Unfortunately, Headley's value has cratered the past two seasons and his current .201 average isn't going to bring much back in return. A team like the Yankees could be interested now that Yangarvis Solarte's magic has worn off, or maybe the Blue Jays (with Brett Lawrie moving to second on a regular basis).

The two relievers are the ones who will get the most attention (Benoit back to Detroit? San Francisco with Sergio Romo's recent struggles? Street to Baltimore?) and Kennedy could make a nice back-end starter for a team like Seattle, Oakland or Atlanta that plays in a homer-friendly park.

What they need: Well, considering they currently have the lowest team batting (.210) of the lively ball era (since 1920) and hit .171 in June (a record low for a month), they'll be looking for hitting prospects. At this point, parting ways with Headley is probably a foregone conclusion. Kennedy has a 4.01 ERA but does have a fine 111/27 SO/BB ratio so he should be able to help somebody's rotation. But he's also been a valuable workhose so the Padres may want to keep him around for 2015.

Likely scenario: Headley, Smith, Denorfia and at least one of the relievers gets traded. Less likely that that Kennedy gets dealt.
--David Schoenfield


San Francisco Giants

Status: All in.

Biggest needs: Giants' second basemen this season have combined for the second-worst average in the majors, hovering below the Mendoza line at .171. Brandon Hicks started off strong, but the recent free-fall could result in a larger role for prospect Joe Panik. Second base has been the clear and most concerning gap, followed by a lack of depth on the bench. The bullpen has been solid most of the season, but closer Sergio Romo was removed from his role on Sunday after blowing three of his last five save opportunities. While there has been talk of the Giants' interest in David Price or Jeff Samardzija, Giants general manager Brian Sabean is probably inclined to keep his rotation intact.

Possible trade targets: 2B/OF Ben Zobrist; 2B Daniel Murphy; 2B Chase Utley; UT Eduardo Nunez; OF Eric Young Jr.

That prospect everyone will want but the Giants won't want to trade: RHP Kyle Crick. But honestly, I'm not sure there is a prospect everyone will want that the Giants won't want to trade. San Francisco's farm system has been in the dumps since the graduations of Buster Posey, Madison Bumgarner and Brandon Belt. Crick is regarded as the best prospect in the system, but a 6.4 BB/9 in the minors highlights his command issues. He may not even make it to the majors as a starting pitcher, but rather as a reliever. The farm system is currently in limbo, to say the least.

Likely scenario: I don't envision Sabean sitting back in his chair too much longer as the losses have piled up for his team after they got off to the best 60-game start in the league. The versatility of Zobrist doubled with the Rays' desires to cash in on their expendable assets would ultimately fill the Giants black hole at second base. Don't be surprised to see a backup outfielder or infielder (or both) get picked up somewhere along the line. Sabean's always had a good eye in the bargain bin.
--Connor Grossman, West Coast Bias

SPONSORED HEADLINES