Don't let hate of A-Rod cost you games

August, 19, 2013
8/19/13
4:39
PM ET
OK, we get it: Other major leaguers are not currently members of the Alex Rodriguez fan club. As colleague Jim Bowden and others have put it, players feel Rodriguez stole money from them by cheating; he got money that would have otherwise gone to other players.

Three quick thoughts:

1. When Ryan Dempster purposely hit Rodriguez in the second inning -- and he did, of course, hit him on purpose and should have been ejected -- the Red Sox were up 2-0. A-Rod was leading off the inning. Dempster hasn't exactly been Pedro Martinez 2000 here with his performance in 2013. Why jeopardize a game -- a game you need to win since you're battling for first place -- by plunking Rodriguez to make a point? That hit by pitch started a two-run rally and arguably changed the complexion of the game. No matter how strongly the Red Sox felt about Rodriguez, it was a stupid, stupid decision.

2. Did Red Sox manager John Farrell know what was going to happen? According to WEEI, the Red Sox will option pitcher Rubby De La Rosa back to Triple-A before today's game. De La Rosa pitched an inning on Sunday but was a starter in the minors. Did the Red Sox keep him around an extra day in case Dempster got ejected early?

3. Considering the Red Sox have their own dubious history with PEDs, watch those stones you throw. The Red Sox are completely clean? Nobody on their team has used PEDs or is using them? Or has a prescription to Adderall or something ADHD drug when they don't really need it? If Red Sox players are unhappy that Rodriguez gets to play while his appeal is under way, they should remember that Rodriguez -- and every other player -- has negotiated that privilege. Players shouldn't forget all the years of labor unrest they fought for to acquire those rights.

David Schoenfield | email

SweetSpot blogger

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Comments

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, photo & other personal information you make public on Facebook will appear with your comment, and may be used on ESPN's media platforms. Learn more.