Time to crack down on substance abuse

April, 11, 2014
Apr 11
12:00
PM ET
PinedaTom Szczerbowski/Getty ImagesIt appears Pineda had something on his palm during his first start of the year in Toronto.
It appears that Thursday night wasn't the first time Michael Pineda had apparently used some sort of foreign substance on his hand. As you can see in the photo above from his first start of the year in Toronto, there appears to be something that looks like pine tar on his palm.

Since that game was played inside at Toronto, Pineda can't even use cold weather as a potential excuse. A quick scroll back through photos from his Mariners days in 2011 doesn't reveal anything suspicious, so whatever Pineda may or may not be using appears to be something new.

"I don't use pine tar," Pineda said after the game. "It's dirt. I'm sweating on my hand too much in between innings." Sounds a little bit like the excuse Red Sox pitcher Clay Buchholz used last year when his forearm appeared a little extra shiny.

For reference, here's rule 8.02(A):
The pitcher shall not --

(4) apply a foreign substance of any kind to the ball

(6) deliver a ball altered in a manner prescribed by Rule 8.02(a)

Penalty: The pitcher shall be ejected immediately and suspended automatically.

[+] EnlargePineda
Peter G. Aiken/USA TODAY SportsWhen Pineda was pitching for Seattle in 2011, it didn't appear that he had anything on his palm.
In 2012, Tampa Bay Rays reliever Joel Peralta was ejected from a game and suspended eight games after he was caught with pine tar in his glove. Red Sox starter Jon Lester had some strange-looking green-colored substance in his glove last October. Of course, Pineda wasn't ejected from the game, so it's unclear whether he would face a possible suspension.

As Buster Olney wrote today in his blog, that could be why the Red Sox didn't raise an issue about the suspicious-looking nature of Pineda's hand: Everybody is doing something to get a better grip on the baseball.

Pine tar is one way to get a better grip on the ball. So is sunscreen, which is what Buchholz was likely using last May when Blue Jays broadcaster Jack Morris accused him of throwing a spitball. In the wake of the Buchholz incident, Yahoo's Jeff Passan reported that, according to his sources, most pitchers use spray-on sunscreen.

Passan wrote:
Two veteran pitchers and one source close to the Red Sox told Yahoo! Sports that about 90 percent of major league pitchers use some form of spray-on sunscreen – almost always BullFrog brand – that when combined with powdered rosin gives them a far superior grip on the ball. …

… "I just don't get the difference between BullFrog and hitters using pine tar," the NL pitcher said. "No difference whatsoever. Pitcher needs better grip so he knows somewhat where it's going and doesn't hit the batter in the head.

"I've never heard of it affecting movement. Scuffs on the ball are the only thing that can do that."

Though the BullFrog concoction may not foster unnatural movement, the pitchers admitted that once they mastered its whims -- balls that are too sticky end up bouncing 5 feet in front of the plate, so it can take time to tame -- it unquestionably helped their stuff. The better grip a pitcher has, the more confident he is in unleashing his pitches. The longer a ball stays on his fingers, the better finish he gets on the pitch.

As for the quote about hitters, the pitcher is missing one obvious point: It's legal for a batter to use pine tar; it's illegal for a pitcher to use a foreign substance.

It makes you wonder a little bit: Has offense declined in recent years due to the proliferation of spray-on sunscreen? Is that one reason pitchers are dominating like we have seen in 25 years? Is BullFrog (or pine tar) to pitchers what steroids were to hitters?

As offense spirals downward, maybe it's time for Major League Baseball to crack down on another wave of substance abuse.

David Schoenfield | email

SweetSpot blogger

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