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Monday, October 5, 2009
Introducing ... the SweetSpot Network!


As you might have noticed already, there are changes afoot here in SweetSpotLand. In a sort of experiment that's likely to become much more than that, this month we're partnering with blogs covering eight of the nine still-alive teams. If this works well -- and we think it will -- eventually we'll have blogs covering all 30 teams (including the currently missing Rockies).

For now, though, it's just these eight. They'll pop up in various places, but for now the easiest access is probably via the SweetSpot Network dropdown just above the traditional blogroll on the right side of this page. And to get you started, below are each of the blogs and some of today's highlights.

Oh, and welcome aboard to everyone!

Fire Brand of the American League (Red Sox) previews the upcoming Red Sox-Angels Division Series.

Mack Avenue Tigers digs deep into the issues surrounding Miguel Cabrera's uncomfortable weekend.

GoHalos.com (Angels) explains why this year will be different.

Memories of Kevin Malone (Dodgers) runs through the Dodgers' Division Series roster with a fine-toothed comb.

Nick's Twins Blog reviews the Twins' storybook comeback and hopes the tale's not about to end.

It's About the Money (Stupid!) (Yankees) recalls three favorite memories of 2009.

Crashburn Alley (Phillies) offers the most rigorous preview of the Phillies-Rockies Division Series that you're going to see.

Fungoes (Cardinals) offers Jeff Suppan as a fine object lesson in the importance of team defense.*

* I suppose I'll say more about this later, but in response to those (Jim Caple) who argue for Felix Hernandez over Zack Greinke because Hernandez faced tougher competition ... Well, he didn't. Not appreciably. The batters Hernandez faced finished the season with just slightly better numbers than the batters Greinke faced. But you know what wasn't even? Defense. When it comes to converting batted balls into outs, the Mariners were one of the best in the American League ... and the Royals one of the worst.