Fitzpatrick drop depth an issue vs. rush

November, 26, 2013
11/26/13
1:15
PM ET
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- While offensive line protection was the biggest factor, the need for Tennessee Titans quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick to scramble so much on Sunday in Oakland was partly his own fault.

That was the thinking of Frank Wycheck, the analyst for Titans Radio and a sports-talk colleague of mine in Nashville. He said during the broadcast that Fitzpatrick’s depth on shotgun snaps was part of the problem, as Fitzpatrick wasn’t dropping much after receiving the ball.

Fitzpatrick
Tuesday morning Wycheck had a chance to ask offensive coordinator Dowell Loggains about it.

“One of the things we fight with all you stubborn vets is you think you’ve been doing something for nine years like that and you’ve had success like that,” Loggains said. “And Fitz knows. If he was listening right now, he’d be laughing because that’s something I’m always on him about.

“I’m like, ‘Hey, your drop. You’re just catching it and sitting there.’ That’s great when you’re throwing three-step. That’s what he did in Buffalo. I’m like, ‘Hey, take a drop. Get back, create a little space so you can push up in the pocket and step up.' It’s something he’s really comfortable with. In Buffalo they were catching the ball and throwing it, it was all three-step and getting the ball out. But for him, every drop looks the same. We’re going to continue to work with him on it. He feels a lot more comfortable in shotgun than under center. He’s working on it, and he knows and we’re definitely working on it with him as well.”

(Here is the whole Loggains interview.)

The offensive line isn’t good enough at this stage, even with some injury issues. It was supposed to be the backbone of this team and it hasn't been. In Oakland, while the group played better late than it did early, the Raiders had far too easy of a time getting Fitzpatrick off his spot.

Fitzpatrick needs to work to minimize his own role in the problem.

Paul Kuharsky | email

ESPN Tennessee Titans reporter

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Comments

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, photo & other personal information you make public on Facebook will appear with your comment, and may be used on ESPN's media platforms. Learn more.


Insider