Bulluck: CJ a 'me' person as an athlete

March, 6, 2014
Mar 6
4:30
PM ET
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- I wrote earlier Thursday that Chris Johnson should have been to the Tennessee Titans facility to meet Ken Whisenhunt by now and to make his case for staying.

Johnson
Keith Bulluck was on the Titans with Johnson in 2008 and 2009 and is a weekly guest on my Nashville radio show, The Midday 180.

"If I wanted to be there and it was important to me, I would make it my duty -- especially considering I have a house there -- I would make it my business to get in and say, 'Look, what's going on, blah, blah, blah,'" Bulluck said. "Even if I'm not going to be on the team, just to meet him. It's just professionalism. But, I will say, different strokes for different folks. Some people are too cool for school, some people don't get it, they don't get how things work. You know, CJ's been there a while. You guys have been covering him, you know what type of person he is.

"He's a friend of mine but when it comes to athlete, he's a 'me' person. He's a 'me' person when it comes to the athlete. For the years that he's been there, it's never been his fault why he didn't have a good running game or why he didn't have a good game. It was always somebody else's fault. I'm not surprised that CJ hasn't come in to even meet coach or see what's going on in general. I'm not surprised by that."

If my memory is correct, that's the first on-the-record comment from someone who's played with Johnson about him being a "me" guy.

Earlier in his career, I said I didn't have an issue with a productive running back having a "give-me-the-ball" attitude. It's the nature of the position, at least to a degree.

But when a self-proclaimed playmaker averages 3.9 yards a carry and tops out with the 30-yarder, it's time to reassess that. It's not important to Johnson that I have already. It should be more important to him that the Titans are doing it, too.

Paul Kuharsky | email

ESPN Tennessee Titans reporter

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Comments

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, photo & other personal information you make public on Facebook will appear with your comment, and may be used on ESPN's media platforms. Learn more.


Insider