At start, McCluster will be more RB than WR

March, 12, 2014
Mar 12
4:52
PM ET
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Dexter McCluster isn’t 5-foot-8, he said in an informal meeting with the Tennessee Titans' press corps. He’s 5-8 ¼.

He said it with a laugh, talked of feeling 6-3 on the day he was officially introduced and said there are times that his size is to his advantage.

McCluster
McCluster
With regard to comparisons to Danny Woodhead, a 5-8 running back who was used expertly by coach Ken Whisenhunt as coordinator in San Diego last season, McCluster said, “We’re both tall.”

Size is not an issue, he said. He feels as big as everyone else when he’s on the field.

“All my life it’s been the same story, I’m too small," he said. "But it never bothered me ... It’s not hard at all to be this size and to last in the NFL.

"... I can get lost behind the crowd, and by the time you see me, it might be too late. With my shiftiness, I try to avoid as much contact as I can. Obviously it’s a contact sport, but it has its perks."

What meeting room will he be part of?

McCluster said he’s not even certain yet if he’ll be a pupil of running backs coach Sylvester Croom or receivers coach Shawn Jefferson.

“To be honest it’s going to be interesting to figure that out,” he said. “I don’t know that answer now, I have to wait until I get in and take orders."

According to Ken Whisenhunt, the initial thought is that McCluster will be more of a running back. But the Titans intend to use his versatility and see how things shake out, and things may be different game to game.

He pointed to good work by McCluster as a running back, a receiver and a returner in Kansas City.

“Those are three pretty strong components of a resume right there,” Whisenhunt said.

Good routes out of the backfield are a strength of his, and they are something the Titans have not gotten in recent years. They’ve never been much of a screen team.

Whisenhunt and McCluster might do a lot to change that.

Paul Kuharsky | email

ESPN Tennessee Titans reporter

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