A Titans' rookie QB wouldn't get snaps

March, 19, 2014
Mar 19
5:12
PM ET
Tennessee Titans general manager Ruston Webster was with coach Ken Whisenhunt at Louisville's pro day earlier this week.

While Webster and Whisenhunt weren't in attendance to watch just Teddy Bridgewater, they certainly observed his workout with interest.

Tennessee could draft a quarterback in May, though I don't think they will have a crack at an elite one at No. 11, and imagine the ideal selection would come later in the draft.

The thing about a rookie signal-caller is the Titans would have trouble getting him the work he'd need in order to develop.

Jake Locker is in place as the starter, and Charlie Whitehurst has replaced Ryan Fitzpatrick as the veteran backup.

Whisenhunt and offensive coordinator Jason Michael will install a new system and Locker will need a lot of snaps to learn it. (Even if he was in an old, more familiar system, he'll need the bulk of the snaps.)

"I think in training camp ... Jake's your starter, he's going to get the majority of snaps, and Charlie after that," Webster said on a Nashville radio station Tuesday. "I think you can see enough in practice, in preseason games to get a little bit of a feel.

"Obviously if he moved up the depth chart then the more snaps he'd get. But initially, you're right, your snaps are going to go to your starter."

An injured guy like Georgia's Aaron Murray or LSU's Zach Mettenberger will likely need time to work their way back from their respective knee injuries. If the Titans like one of them, he could be a draft value, available later than he'd be if healthy.

Having few snaps for Murray or Mettenberger would be less of an issue early on in what could amount to a redshirt year. Then he could be an option for 2015 if the Titans decide Locker is not the guy.

Paul Kuharsky | email

ESPN Tennessee Titans reporter

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