MVP of the season so far

February, 11, 2016
Feb 11
4:35
PM ET
By ESPN.com
ESPN.com

video
In this Animated Minute, Marc Stein says there is really only one candidate for MVP. Watch TrueHoop TV.

Energizing All-Stars

February, 10, 2016
Feb 10
3:44
PM ET
By ESPN.com
ESPN.com

David Thorpe and Henry Abbott on how Sunday's big game will feature very tired versions of the best players in the world. Watch TrueHoop TV.video

How Stephen Curry got the best worst ankles in sports

February, 10, 2016
Feb 10
3:09
PM ET
By Pablo S. Torre, ESPN Senior Writer
ESPN.com

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STEPHEN CURRY DIDN'T know if he'd wake up owning a dead man's tendons.

It was April 25, 2012, and inside the Southern California Orthopedic Institute in Van Nuys, a renowned surgeon hovered over a baby-faced, decreasingly conscious Curry. In the vast majority of the ankles operated on by Dr. Richard Ferkel, who's cut thousands of holes into hundreds of NBA players since 1983, he knew precisely what he'd find well before the anesthesia started pumping -- structural damage, scar tissue, etc. But here in this fourth-floor operating room, something wasn't adding up with his 185-pound patient. As the clock ticked and the Curry family prayed just down the hall, Steph went to sleep a mystery.

Before the drugs hit, Ferkel had explained a range of potential outcomes. Less than a year before, in Curry's hometown of Charlotte, North Carolina, a specialist had already sliced open that same right ankle and rebuilt two ligaments that had stretched apart like a rotting sweater. The worst-case scenario now? Total re-reconstruction, meaning that everything rebuilt in Curry's first surgery would be reattempted. If that proved necessary, they'd use better parts -- specifically, tendons from a cadaver -- and the projected recovery time would be at least six months. But such an operation would also be extreme enough that no one would be sure how the new hinge would hold up on the court. One near certainty: With Curry's rookie deal expiring in six months, on Nov. 1, 2012, his future with Golden State would be that much hazier. His agent would likely need to negotiate an extension before the undead ankle could appear in a game.

Understand: The four doctors and two nurses in the operating room didn't know they were endeavoring to save the future of the NBA. Nobody, anywhere, considered that a 24-year-old who was still getting carded at California Pizza Kitchen was the impending nightmare of both LeBron James and Kevin Durant. At this point, Curry's trajectory was just depressing: In his first NBA season after the original procedure, he suffered five ankle sprains while playing in a mere 26 games.

"He was turning his ankle in completely nontraditional, crazy ways," Warriors general manager Bob Myers says. One time, Curry turned it while hopping into a passing lane during a preseason game against the Lakers. Another time, he was dribbling upcourt against the Spurs, with no one around, only to have his right foot fishtail like an old tire on black ice. "It was scary," Myers says. "I'd never seen someone sprain his ankle like that prior to Steph. And I haven't seen it since."

The league had once envisioned Curry as a sharpshooter with a close-up magician's gift of misdirection. But now, as the Warriors guard rested atop Ferkel's operating table, his career resembled a crossover in reverse: a case of ankles breaking a man. "People started saying, 'Steph's got glass ankles. Steph's Grant Hill 2.0,'" recalls Bryant Barr, Curry's best friend and college teammate at Davidson. "He didn't hide his emotions, his frustration, for anyone." In college, somehow, Curry had no history of right ankle trouble. As a pro? The sight of the guy chucking his mouth guard, punching a padded chair or slapping the floor in existential agony became more memorable than any highlight.

When Curry eventually blacked out on the operating table, however, a rather remarkable thing happened. A recent battery of strength tests, nerve tests, X-rays, MRIs and CAT scans had all failed to resolve why his ankle kept buckling. But a set of stress X-rays conducted midsleep, when pain can't impact motion, formally ruled out any structural damage to the ligaments. A 1-ounce HD camera snaked into Curry's subtalar and ankle joints produced images of thick, sticky bands of scar tissue -- "like crab meat," Ferkel says -- as well as inflamed tissue, bone spurs and chips of cartilage. To anyone else, orthopedic seafood might be revolting. To Curry, "it was good news," he says. "The least intrusive outcome." A motorized device called a shaver scraped and vacuumed all of it away in less than 90 minutes. No zombie tendons necessary. Projected recovery time: three to four months.

Easier said than done, of course. Three months later, in July 2012, Curry was rehabbing with his personal trainer, Brandon Payne, when he made a startling confession: "I feel like I've been doing nothing but rehabbing for two years," Curry quietly told him. "I feel like I'm never going to be able to play again."

He looked exceptionally miserable. And everyone could see it.

"Steph was sick and tired of it," Myers recalls. "He said, 'This ankle thing is not gonna be my life.'"

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Draymond Green redefines All-Star

February, 10, 2016
Feb 10
2:40
PM ET
By ESPN.com
ESPN.com

video

In this Animated Minute, Ethan Sherwood Strauss says the Warrior is clearly one of the NBA's very best, despite lacking jaw-dropping scoring moves. Watch TrueHoop TV.

Ultimate what-if: Sources reveal 2007 Kobe-for-LeBron trade talk

February, 10, 2016
Feb 10
2:16
PM ET
By Brian Windhorst, ESPN Senior Writer
ESPN.com

LeBron James and Kobe Bryant Noah Graham/Getty Images

Kobe Bryant and LeBron James play each other Wednesday night, Bryant's final game in Cleveland.

Their matchup over the years has been one of cross-conference shadow boxing; injury and circumstance have prevented them from having an epic playoff showdown. One or the other played in every NBA Finals from 2007 to 2015, but never against each other.

There is another piece of history the two share, one mostly hidden until now. According to multiple sources with direct knowledge of the event, the Lakers once contacted the Cavs to investigate whether Cleveland would make James available in a possible Bryant trade.

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NBA coaches, culture and volatile owners

February, 9, 2016
Feb 9
4:49
PM ET
By ESPN.com
ESPN.com

videoDavid Thorpe on whether or not this is a case of owners-gone-wild.

Would Magic's Lakers really beat the Warriors?

February, 9, 2016
Feb 9
1:57
PM ET
By ESPN.com
ESPN.com

videoDavid Thorpe and Henry Abbott disagree. Watch TrueHoop TV.

Brett Brown's top 5 players ever

February, 9, 2016
Feb 9
12:09
PM ET
By ESPN.com
ESPN.com

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76ers head coach Brett Brown shares his list for the best five players of all time. Watch TrueHoop TV.

Kobe ranked 12th all time: Fair or Foul?

February, 5, 2016
Feb 5
3:32
PM ET
By ESPN.com
ESPN.com

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Kevin Pelton and Kevin Arnovitz assess the All-Time #NBArank of one of the most polarizing figures in the NBA. Watch TrueHoop TV.

All-time greats without a ring

February, 4, 2016
Feb 4
5:31
PM ET
By ESPN.com
ESPN.com

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Kevin Arnovitz and Kevin Pelton discuss how to rank all-time greats who played during the same time as Michael Jordan. Watch TrueHoop TV.

Larry Bird will die young. Just ask him

February, 4, 2016
Feb 4
12:10
PM ET
By Jackie MacMullan, ESPN Senior Writer
ESPN.com

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INDIANA PACERS COACH Larry Bird wasn't even sure which play his team was running because his damn heart was kicking out again. He wondered if anyone noticed him sweating profusely, his shirt drenched under his suit and tie, an all-too-familiar symptom whenever his heart started rattling around his chest like a basketball in an empty trash barrel. The waves of nausea and dizziness overtook him next, muddling his concentration and leaving him feeling light-headed. When the sudden arrhythmia would occur during his training sessions in his playing days -- long before he'd informed any medical personnel about it -- he would always lie down immediately and nap for several hours, because if he didn't, he risked losing consciousness.

But on March 17, 1998, the 41-year-old coach of the Eastern Conference-contending Pacers, in the thick of a hotly contested game with the defending champion Bulls, could hardly recline and sleep it off. "Oh god," Bird thought as he tried to steady himself on the Indiana sideline. "Please don't let me pass out on the court."

Instead, the referees whistled the customary television timeout, allowing Bird to sink into the chair his team dragged onto the court for him during stoppages in play. When Bird had been hired in 1997, he'd made the unorthodox decision to entrust assistant Rick Carlisle with drawing up offensive plays in the huddle. Now, as Carlisle diagrammed Indiana's next move against Michael Jordan and the Bulls, Bird wiped the sweat from his brow (and his wrists and neck) and tried to regain his composure.

He finished the game without further incident, avoiding detection from anyone on his staff. Bird, who has an enlarged heart, was diagnosed in 1995 with atrial fibrillation, an abnormal heartbeat resulting from electrical signals being generated chaotically throughout the heart's upper chambers. With proper medication, exercise and diet, atrial fibrillation can be controlled, but Bird abhorred medication and was prone to skipping his pills. Part of the reason, he admits, was his own fatalistic view of what the future would bring.

"I tell my wife all the time, 'You don't see many 7-footers walking around at the age of 75,'" says Bird, who's 6-foot-9. "She hates it when I say that. I know there are a few of us who live a long time, but most of us big guys don't seem to last too long. I'm not lying awake at night thinking about it. If it goes, it goes."

It's a macabre outlook for Larry Legend -- but he's hardly alone in harboring it. Ask a bunch of NBA big men and the consensus is that their atypical size and the strains placed on their bodies during their careers cause them to deteriorate more quickly and die younger. The bigger they are, the younger they fall -- or so they think. Is it possible they're right?

READ THE FULL STORY

Kevin Arnovitz, Ethan Sherwood Strauss and Brian Windhorst talk Kobe's big night, when the Celtics should cash in on their assets, Anthony Davis, Dwight Howard's woes and KD.

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Kevin Arnovitz and Kevin Pelton assess Steph Curry's All-Time #NBArank. Watch TrueHoop TV.

Isiah Thomas ranked too high?

February, 2, 2016
Feb 2
4:35
PM ET
By ESPN.com
ESPN.com

video

Kevin Arnovitz and Kevin Pelton discuss Isiah Thomas' All-Time #NBArank. Is Zeke too high? Watch TrueHoop TV.

The case for Jason Kidd as one of the all-time greats

February, 2, 2016
Feb 2
1:28
PM ET
By ESPN.com
ESPN.com

video

Kevin Arnovitz and Kevin Pelton discuss Jason Kidd's spot on All-Time #NBArank.

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