When Larry Met Stanley

August, 29, 2014
Aug 29
2:14
PM ET
By Adam Reisinger
ESPN.com
Archive
Since beating the Miami Heat in the NBA Finals, the San Antonio Spurs -- the NBA's most international squad -- have been letting their players take the Larry O'Brien Trophy on tour in their native countries. This week it was reserve guard Cory Joseph's turn with the trophy, and the third-year vet from Canada paid a visit to the Hockey Hall of Fame and Museum in Toronto for an historic meeting of the trophies.



Since the NBA formed (as the BAA) in 1946-47, there hasn't been a single season in which the NBA and NHL champion came from the same city. The most recent close call came in 2003, when the New Jersey Devils won the Stanley Cup, while the New Jersey Nets lost to the Spurs in six games in the NBA Finals.

First Cup: Friday

August, 29, 2014
Aug 29
4:56
AM ET
By Nick Borges
ESPN.com
Archive
  • Chris Haynes of CSNNW.com: Damian Lillard is not out of the loop completely when it comes to his summer involvement with Team USA and FIBA World Cup competition in Spain. Prior to being left off of the final 12-man roster last week, the Portland Trail Blazers’ All-Star point guard was informed that there could be a possibility he’d be added to the roster if one of their players, in particular Derrick Rose who has been dealing with knee soreness, were unable or opted not to continue the journey, a league source told CSNNW.com. “He’s the player on deck,” we’re told. Lillard expressed to Jerry Colangelo, director of USA Basketball, his desire to be a part of Team USA in Spain and said he would rejoin the team if his services are indeed needed, the source said. “It’s something we did discuss with Damian,” Colangelo confirmed to CSNNW.com via telephone. “We’ll see what happens.”
  • Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle: There are Rockets players all over the World Cup rosters, but Motiejunas’ play for Lithuania might be the most relevant to the Rockets’ plans. He still seems likely to be with the Rockets’ second unit. They are not expecting him to fill the role they hoped to give Chris Bosh. But on a team with questionable depth, Motiejunas will have a chance to give the Rockets’ second team the low post scoring and defensive rebounding he gave their summer league team. Motiejunas averaged 16.8 points and 8.1 rebounds in 27.1 minutes per game in Las Vegas. He made 59.3 percent of his shots, most with a mix of low-post moves, but with 38.5 percent shooting on his 3s. That was against the usual summer league rosters of prospects and young players. Going into his third season, Motiejunas should be more advanced in his career and looked it. But beyond the numbers, he seemed more relaxed, less frantic. When he did not get his touches, especially in the early games, he was more patient, less desperate to prove himself.
  • Chris Kudialis of the Detroit Free Press: Two days before Team USA opens the FIBA World Cup against Finland, Pistons center Andre Drummond was an active participant in Thursday’s practice. Working on back-to-the-basket drills with assistant coach Monty Williams, Drummond spent the last 15 minutes of media-accessible practice time practicing individually with Team USA assistants. Recently turned 21, Drummond is Team USA’s youngest player on an inexperienced roster that includes eight first-time senior team participants. One of four Team USA centers along with New Orleans’ Anthony Davis, Sacramento’s DeMarcus Cousins and Brooklyn’s Mason Plumlee, Drummond isn’t initially expected to see much playing time in Saturday’s opening game. But for Drummond, the chance to represent his country on the highest level international stage has so far been a “wild ride.” ... As for playing on the same team as division rivals Kyrie Irving of Cleveland and Derrick Rose of Chicago, among other NBA foes, Drummond says the adaptation wasn’t instantaneous but hasn’t been a problem. Above all, according to Drummond, the 12 men representing the U.S. all have one goal in common. “When you put on a Team USA jersey, all egos and NBA rivalries get thrown out the window. We’re here for one thing and that’s to win the gold medal,” he said.
  • John Reid of The Times-Picayune: Regardless of the risks, however, New Orleans Pelicans forward Anthony Davis said during a conference call on Thursday that he values his opportunity to participate. And Pelicans coach Monty Williams, who is an assistant on Team USA, obviously endorses Davis’ participation. "It’s such a cool thing for a basketball player," Williams said. "A number of our guys talk about they couldn’t get this kind of preparation back at home, even if they were in L.A., Chicago or Houston, where a lot of guys go play and work out. I think that’s one of the reasons why you are seeing him and other guys improving on the fly. I think all of the guys here would agree that this atmosphere allows you to get better by listening to different coaches and different people that teach the game. There’s been a few days where I hadn’t worked with Anthony at all and allowed him to work with other coaches just so he can learn something different and get a break for me."
  • Steven Loung of Sportsnet.ca Do you think all of Canada’s big players—like Andrew Wiggins and Anthony Bennett—will be there with you and the rest of the team next summer for the Olympic qualifying tournament? Cory Joseph: "I think so. I mean, I can’t predict the future but I’ve talked to them and I know they definitely like the idea and definitely want to play. But, again, I can’t predict the future and you never know what could happen." SN: On the topic of Wiggins, what are your thoughts on how that entire situation shook out this summer? Cory Joseph: "It’s a business. Teams are going to do what they feel is best for the organization and [Wiggins will] be fine. He’s a good a kid. He’s a good player, as everybody already knows. He’s got a good head on his shoulders, a good family and he’ll be fine no matter where he’s at."
  • A. Sherrod Blakely of CSNNE.com: Jeff Green isn't known for delivering assists, but don't tell that to his alma mater, Georgetown, which is on the receiving end of a $1 million donation from Green towards the school's new athletic center. Green's seven-figure gift was announced by the university on Thursday. The Boston Celtics forward's gift will go towards the John R. Thompson Jr. Intercollegiate Athletics Center, named after the former Hoyas coach who also spent three seasons in the NBA with the Celtics. "I'm very fortunate to be in a position to give back to the university and to the program that has done so much for me," said Green who led the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007 and was selected by Boston with the No. 5 pick that same year. Green left Georgetown early, but did return to finish his degree in English, with a minor in Theology, in 2012.

Should Derrick Rose be on Team USA?

August, 28, 2014
Aug 28
1:05
PM ET
Elhassan By Amin Elhassan
ESPN.com
Archive
Regardless of the knee issues, is Derrick Rose the best choice for Team USA?

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First Cup: Thursday

August, 28, 2014
Aug 28
5:03
AM ET
By Nick Borges
ESPN.com
Archive
  • Phil Mackey of 1500ESPN.com: There's obviously some tension between the two - and seemingly more from Taylor's side, which seems unwarranted considering Taylor admitted this week that, in retrospect, he should have given Love the max deal after all. Taylor and then-GM David Kahn were the ones who deemed Love not worthy of a five-year max contract two years ago. This contractual snubbing paved the way for what we all saw coming - Love holding a grudge against the organization and eventually bolting for a new team. From a human perspective alone, Love's departure isn't unreasonable at all. Sure, he could have handled it in a way that left him on better terms with Wolves fans, but maybe he just doesn't care. And sure, Love has some flaws as a player and as a leader, but he is still one of the top 10 players in the NBA. And let me ask this: Who has more flaws, Love as a player or Taylor as an owner? Most people would say Taylor without hesitation. That's why his parting shots were so unwarranted.
  • Erik Horne of The Oklahoman: Kevin Durant is a free agent and he has a decision to make. Not about where he's going to play (that's not until 2016). Under Armour and Nike are currently in a tug-of-war for Durant's services. Reports surfaced last week that Roc Nation, which represents Durant, informed Nike that it had an offer on the table from Under Armour worth between $265-285 million over 10 years. Nike has the right to match any offer, but Durant can still choose Nike even if its offer comes in lower than Under Armour's. Numerous reports cited Wednesday as the deadline day for Nike to make a decision. Well, Wednesday came and people started talking. Durant's gone off to Under Armour for 10 years, $325 million. Under Armour has signed Durant for 10 years, $285 million. And nothing happened. Nothing has been confirmed. Nothing has been announced. ESPN's Darren Rovell says Nike still has time to match Under Armour.
  • Michael Kaskey-Blomain of The Philadelphia Inquirer: Sixers’ 2014 lottery selection Joel Embiid has drawn a lot of attention for his comical use of Twitter since his selection by the Sixers. The seven-foot center has used the social media platform to court Kim Kardashian and Rihanna, and he even tried to recruit LeBron James to the 76ers before James announced his intention to return to Cleveland. While developing a popular presence on the internet isn’t necessarily one of the central steps to his recovery, you can still count Sixers general manager Sam Hinkie as one who has been amused by Embiid’s online antics. “I told him I want him to take over my Twitter account,” Hinkie joked on a conference call with media members on Tuesday. “Maybe my followers will pick up. I think I’m at like 20 or so now.” ... Hinkie did acknowledge the timing of the tweets however, and made mention of the fact that Embiid’s humor may not always fall favorably. “Sometimes you find yourself in the middle of February, or late in March, or in the middle of a road trip, and some of that humor doesn’t go over as well,” Hinkie said. Translation: The Twitter-talk is fine and funny in the offseason, but when the Sixers are 12-45 in February, struggling through a road trip, his teammates might not find it so funny.
  • Rachel Whittaker of The Times-Picayune: January 3 was a very scary day for the New Orleans Pelicans and Ryan Anderson. The 25-year-old suffered two herniated discs in his neck at Boston that night and missed the rest of the 2014 season with an injury that could have been career-threatening. But Anderson has been working his way back through rehabilitation and feels "great," as he told sports reporter Rachel Whittaker this week. The Pelicans begin training camp in October and the regular season Oct. 28 at the Smoothie King Center. Anderson said he's thrilled to have a healthier cast of players around him as well. So many of his teammates also underwent surgery that left the Pelicans with a shell of the team they'd hoped for.
  • Barry Jackson of The Miami Herald: Seeking help at backup shooting guard behind Dwyane Wade, the Heat on Wednesday signed journeyman Shannon Brown, who has played for seven teams in eight NBA seasons. Brown has averaged 7.7 points and shot 42 percent overall and 33.1 percent on three-pointers in 403 games, including 58 starts. The Heat offered him a contract after he worked out for team officials on Tuesday. ... The Heat has spent several weeks looking for a shooting guard that it liked and was willing to accept the veteran's minimum. Miami auditioned Chris Douglas-Roberts and also had direct contact with Jordan Crawford. Leandro Barbosa also received consideration.
  • Perry A. Farrell of the Detroit Free Press: Ten-day contracts, stints in the NBA Development League, stops in Golden State, Washington, Charlotte, Atlanta and Chicago. Cartier Martin has done it. “It has been a lot of dedication, staying committed and not giving up,’’ Martin said after working out Wednesday morning. “I know I can play in this league." So now Detroit is possibly home for two years and, at 29, he still has the fire and energy to get it done. That’s how Pistons president and head coach Stan Van Gundy described the fourth small forward under contract with the team. Martin will be the third oldest player on the roster behind Caron Butler, another small forward, and Will Bynum once training camp starts in October. “This has allowed me to get some experience under my belt as far as playing basketball," Martin said.
  • Scott Horner of The Indianapolis Star: The list of professional athletes taking up rap music is long and, naturally, Robbie Hummel is next. Yes, Hummel, the former Purdue University basketball star, posted a photo of himself on Instagram claiming to be in a studio working on an album called "ROB: Road to Redemption." Excited to announce that I've been in the studio grinding and have finally finished my first hip hop studio album, ROB: Road to Redemption. Look for it in stores and on iTunes this fall. #getmysnareup #turnmyheadphonesup!!! ... Is it for real? We're not sure, and neither was the Minnesota Timberwolves public relations department. Hummel dropped some sample lyrics after his initial post. "219/On my grind/Got them haters on my mind/The ACL/Can burn in hell/Ride of die/From Parker drive."
  • A. Sherrod Blakely of CSNNE.com: The Maine Red Claws will have a new man in charge this season as Scott Morrison is set to become the team's new head coach. He replaces Mike Taylor who amassed a 45-55 record in two seasons with the Red Claws, the Development League affiliate of the Boston Celtics. Morrison was a scout and assistant coach with the Red Claws last season. He also spent 10 seasons as the head coach at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ontario, finishing with a record of 185-174 which included winning the Ontario University Athletics men’s basketball championship in 2012 along with a second-place finish in the Canadian Interuniversity Sport men’s basketball championship in 2013.

Kyrie Irving, best point guard in the NBA?

August, 27, 2014
Aug 27
12:37
PM ET
Strauss By Ethan Sherwood Strauss
ESPN.com
Archive
video

ESPN Insider Amin Elhassan predicted Kyrie Irving would be the best point guard in the NBA by 2015. He still has time to be correct.

First Cup: Wednesday

August, 27, 2014
Aug 27
5:16
AM ET
By Nick Borges
ESPN.com
Archive
  • Jerry Zgoda of the Star Tribune: But Glen Taylor said he never expected Love’s offensive skills to develop as much as they have in the past 2 years and he was reluctant then to guarantee Love more than $80 million because of an injury history that at the time included a broken hand and suspect knees. Since then, Love played only 18 games during the 2012-13 season after he broke that same left hand not once, but twice in fewer than three months. “The only thing I still have a question mark about is his health,” Taylor said. “I had that concern then. I still have that concern, and Cleveland should have that concern, too: if he can keep his health. If they sign him to a five-year contract like they’re thinking about, that’s a big contract on a guy who’s had some times when he has missed games.” Taylor then questioned more than Love’s health. He questioned how he’ll fit in Cleveland alongside superstar LeBron James and guard Kyrie Irving. “I question Kevin if this is going to be the best deal for him,” Taylor said. “I think he’ll be the third player on a team. I don’t think he’ll get a lot of credit if they do really well. I think he’ll get the blame if they don’t do well. He’ll have to learn to handle that. He’s around a couple guys who are awful good. Now I’m not saying Kevin isn’t good. I think where he maybe got away with some stuff not playing defense on our team, I’m not sure how it’s going to work in Cleveland. I guess they will ask him to play more defense.”
  • Joe Cowley of the Chicago Sun-Times: Mike Krzyzewski is done asking Derrick Rose how he feels. The Team USA coach made that evident Monday night before Tuesday’s 101-71 win over Slovenia in the final exhibition game at the Gran Canaria Arena in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain. "I asked [Rose on Monday], and he said, ‘I feel great,’ " Krzyzewski told reporters. "He did everything. He’s full-go. I think there’s a part of him that’s like, ‘Quit asking me how I feel. I’m good.’ So I’m not going to ask him anymore." You’d hope someone would because while FIBA World Cup tournament play doesn’t start until Saturday, Rose continued to look like a guy whose game never made it through customs. Coming off the bench behind Kyrie Irving for a second straight game, Rose looked unsure with the ball, evident in three turnovers in his 20 minutes. He was a pedestrian 3-for-6 from the free-throw line, missed an uncontested layup and seemed passive on offense (0-for-3) and inconsistent on defense (minus-4 in the plus/minus category). He wasn’t the player who first showed up to Las Vegas last month, wowing teammates and coaches on both sides of the ball. But for now, Rose gets a free pass.
  • Bob Finnan of The News-Herald: Because Kevin Love’s No. 42 was retired with the Cavaliers, he will become just the fourth player in franchise history to wear No. 0 (the others are Lari Ketner, Jeff McInnis and C.J. Miles). "All respects to Nate Thurmond,” he said. “I really appreciate him and pay my homage to him for having the conversation of allowing me to wear the No. 42. But I thought this was a chance for me to one, start fresh, and two, pick a new number that would suit me. So I went all the way back to my grass roots and my first number I ever played with.” Love was more of an inside player early in his career. Last year, 36 percent of his field-goal attempts were from behind the arc. “I just think that’s where the game is going,” he said. “You’re seeing that European influence over the past 10 to 15 years in the NBA. I always looked at that type of player, No. 41, Dirk Nowitzki. I loved his game. He was able to rebound, was able to shoot the ball and be able (to play with his) back to the basket. I knew I’d be a better commodity for any team in any system if I was as tall as I am and also being able to play inside and outside. I just mentioned I can fit any system, and I think I will fit in (Cavaliers coach David) Blatt’s.”
  • Anthony Slater of The Oklahoman: On Tuesday afternoon, the Thunder traded its third-string center to Philadelphia for a $1.25 million trade exception. OKC also received a 2015 second-round pick in the deal, but it is heavily protected -- a phantom pick -- and will likely never make its way into OKC's hands. With Steven Adams' emergence last season and the first round selection of Mitch McGary in this past June's draft, Thabeet became expendable. Behind Adams and incumbent starter Kendrick Perkins, Scott Brooks has become increasingly more comfortable going small, meaning Nick Collison, McGary and even Serge Ibaka can play center at times. So it was a numbers game for Thabeet, with his departure opening up a roster spot and a bit more financial flexibility heading into the season. Thabeet was due $1.25 million next season, a contract that would have been guaranteed on Sept. 1. OKC is now around $2.9 million under the luxury tax, with its roster at 14.
  • Charles F. Gardner of the Journal Sentinel: Carlos Delfino still will be owed $3.25 million but the Clippers may be able to use a "stretch provision" to delay some of the salary cap hit, the newspaper reported. It's uncertain if the deal could mark the end of Delfino's NBA career, given the serious nature of the foot injury he suffered during the 2013 playoffs when he was with the Houston Rockets. He will turn 32 years old Friday. Delfino worked tirelessly over the past few months with Bucks trainer Scott Barthlama, but a league source said the bone has not healed properly and the Argentine player might be out for another season.
  • Howie KKussoy of the New York Post: Iman Shumpert has spent the summer working on a lot of little things, honing different elements of his offensive arsenal, in preparation for what he expects to be a bigger role in the Knicks offense. Having spent the majority of his young career playing in Mike Woodson’s perimeter-heavy attack, Shumpert said he believes the switch to Derek Fisher’s triangle offense finally will allow him to be properly utilized on the offensive end. "There’s constant action going on," Shumpert said. "I think I’ll be able to capitalize off that and I’ll be able to use my athleticism a lot more than standing in the corner." After tearing his ACL during the 2012 playoffs, missing much of the following season and spraining his MCL in the same knee last season, Shumpert said the biggest focus of his offseason training has been strengthening his left knee back to the level it was during his breakout rookie season.
  • Marc Narducci of The Philadelphia Inquirer: In other Sixers news, Hinkie said that rookie of the year Michael Carter-Williams, who underwent right-shoulder surgery May 6, was shooting and "working out hard" but had not been cleared for five-on-five contact. Hinkie said he was happy with the progress of center Nerlens Noel, who missed all of last season while recovering from anterior cruciate ligament surgery but played with the Sixers in the summer. It's too early to tell whether Embiid will play this season, Hinkie said. Embiid had surgery June 20 for a stress fracture in his right foot. As they were with Noel, the Sixers will likely be cautious with Embiid, who tweeted Tuesday that he signed his NBA contract, although the team had not released the information.

Will Jared Dudley trade help Clippers?

August, 26, 2014
Aug 26
5:55
PM ET
Strauss By Ethan Sherwood Strauss
ESPN.com
Archive
Jared Dudley has been traded to the Bucks after just one year with the Clippers. Ethan Sherwood Strauss and Amin Elhassan break down the trade.

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David Blatt vs. LeBron James

August, 26, 2014
Aug 26
1:12
PM ET
Abbott By Henry Abbott
ESPN.com
Archive
The Cavaliers' new head coach is no wallflower. He's loud, frank, controlling. But is David Blatt destined to butt heads with his new superstar, LeBron James?

Warriors rest future on feats of Klay

August, 26, 2014
Aug 26
11:14
AM ET
Strauss By Ethan Sherwood Strauss
ESPN.com
Archive
videoKevin Love has finally been traded to the Cleveland Cavaliers, a Midwest exchange that, on the face of things, shouldn’t turn stomachs in California. That’s not how the social media age works, though. We know of unconsummated trade talks between the Warriors and Timberwolves and understand that Golden State getting Love was indeed feasible. So this is how a Minnesota player’s move to Cleveland has the potential to haunt fans in the Bay Area, possibly for a decade or more. Everybody saw the path Golden State took when the road forked before it.

The Warriors are finally good enough that one extra piece could make them a real contender. Now, fans are more disappointed than if Golden State had never bothered to try in the first place. The pain of coming up just short of greatness has the potential to burn more acutely than years of prior mediocrity, even though the alternate reality, the one where the Warriors aren’t good enough to even make getting Love a possibility, is a bleaker picture of a more sickly franchise -- something resembling the Chris Cohan era.

[+] EnlargeKevin Love, Klay Thompson
Kelley L Cox/USA TODAY SportsInstead of trading for Kevin Love, the Warriors are counting on Klay Thompson to take a leap forward.
Love reportedly did have interest in joining the Warriors but couldn’t and didn’t promise to stay beyond the year left on his contract. The Warriors did have interest in getting Love but couldn’t bring themselves to part with Klay Thompson. There were many components to the potential deal, but this is the reductive summary: Golden State could have gotten Love had it been willing to part with Thompson before the draft. But after LeBron James chose Cleveland, the Warriors' reluctance to part with Thompson became a moot point, as the Wolves decided they preferred Andrew Wiggins anyway. There was a window for a while, and LeBron closed it.

The Warriors' decision to refuse that window is the source of some confusion around the league. Why couldn’t they part with a rotation player for an All-Star, especially when said rotation player is up for a big contract extension in a year? Love would have been an ideal complement to Stephen Curry on offense, given how both players give teams fits in the pick-and-roll. How could keeping Thompson be worth it?

If the Warriors indeed erred in keeping Thompson, his likability could be partly to blame. It’s easy to forget that workplace drudgery exists behind the exciting, televised game, and the people making decisions must deal with the personalities attached to the talent. Thompson is regarded as the epitome of a good soldier. If he was anything less, he might be buying winter clothes right now.

Love can be viewed as a cantankerous teammate; apparently even Ricky Rubio has had his gripes. Las Vegas Summer League practically doubled as a whisper campaign against the All-Star power forward, perhaps driven by teams attempting to depress his trade value.

In contrast, it’s difficult to uncover complaints about Thompson, who committed to Team USA and made its 12-man roster. Even though last season’s Golden State coaching staff was engulfed in internecine warfare, feuding sides could always agree on their shooting guard. Coaches just love Klay. Mike Krzyzewski is the latest such example.

While the shooting slumps frustrate fans, coaches mostly rave about his work ethic and low-maintenance manner. Thompson plays with a blank expression that can read as apathy, but he is reputed to have an uncommon competitive streak, especially on the defensive end. He is known to keep obsessive track of the impact his defense has on opponents’ offensive stats. Further endearing him to some coaches, he cares little for credit or attention. I’ve personally seen Warriors officials stop Thompson from sneaking out of the building after big scoring performances. He either dreads postgame interviews or is wholly apathetic toward them.

Last season, Thompson was trusted with the toughest defensive assignments, tasked nightly with forcing ball handlers from the middle of the floor. The Warriors coaches believed him to be a better defender than Andre Iguodala, who made the All-Defense first team, even though the on-court/off-court numbers strongly sided with Iguodala.

How Golden State planned its future has much to do with these coaches who no longer work there. Last season’s coaching situation was such a bloody mess that Warriors management isn’t sure of what it has with this current roster. Specifically, it isn't sure of how good Thompson and Harrison Barnes (who was also dangled in talks) are. But there’s an internal expectation that both players are better than what they have shown and will demonstrate that going forward.

Management believes the coaching staff that loved Thompson so much didn’t do enough for him offensively. The Warriors were last in the league in passes per game -- a stat Jerry West likes to derisively cite. Golden State is optimistic that next season will be different. Steve Kerr, another coach who happens to be a big fan of Thompson's, sweeps in with talk of Spurs-style motion offense and triangle-spacing principles.

Plays were almost never called for Thompson last season, but he would sometimes end up with the ball in isolation situations simply because the defense had thwarted the action. Critics would point to Thompson's lack of playmaking and pedestrian true shooting mark. His supporters at Warriors HQ would cite a situation that wasn’t conducive to his catch-and-shoot skill set. The Hawks revolve much of their offense around Kyle Korver. The Warriors weren’t nearly that intentional about using Thompson.

While there is a perception that certain pro-Thompson forces won out within the organization, the Warriors insist that final decision-making rests with majority owner Joe Lacob and general manager Bob Myers. Myers makes the ultimate recommendation, and Lacob holds veto power. The Warriors debate such matters with their other core basketball operations people (assistant GM Travis Schlenk, assistant GM Kirk Lacob, West and Kerr), but this is by design. This is part of what management considers its "internal due diligence," a process of many voices informing the final choice. Myers has the technical authority to ignore these perspectives but trends toward courting many opinions.

[+] EnlargeSteve Kerr
Justin Sullivan/Getty ImagesNew coach Steve Kerr and the Warriors front office see ways to open up Thompson's offensive game.
Is this a chaotic “too many chefs” problem or simply an open-minded organization that favors inquiry over ego? It really depends on how successful you deem the decisions.

What's curious about Golden State’s wisdom-of-crowds approach is it produced a different result from what a majority of NBA observers (including yours truly) would have advocated. In our ESPN Forecast polling, the Warriors would have roughly tripled their title chances with a Love acquisition.

It’s not like Lacob is apathetic at the prospect of winning a championship. He’s a maniacal presence on the sideline of every home game. He’s laying the groundwork for a stadium in San Francisco. He has every incentive to triple Golden State’s title chances, if such a thing is possible.

“Only we know all the details of such discussions that may or may not have occurred,” Lacob wrote in an email discussing the trade. “And, if it even needs to be said, nobody wants to win as badly as we want to win. We have invested our money, our time, our reputations.”

Fair or not, those reputations are in the hands of Klay Thompson, the good soldier. If he fails to markedly improve and Love thrives in the spotlight, this summer will be viewed as a disaster.

It wouldn’t be that way in a bygone era. We never would have known of this almost-deal, or at least wouldn’t have cared so much. This is the new reality, though. By doing nothing at all, the Warriors have made a big, risky trade for their own player.

Theory of gravity

August, 26, 2014
Aug 26
10:24
AM ET
Elhassan By Amin Elhassan
ESPN.com
Archive
video

The shooting ability of LeBron's new Big 3 have the potential to make life on offense whole lot easier for him.

First Cup: Tuesday

August, 26, 2014
Aug 26
5:12
AM ET
By Nick Borges
ESPN.com
Archive
  • Marc Berman of the New York Post: The Greek agent for Knicks draft pick Thanasis Antetokounmpo said he’s “amazed’’ his client chose to play in the NBA’s D-League for the $25,000 cap and turn down an offer from an A-Division team in the Italian League, calling it “a big sacrifice." According to agent Tim Lotsos, the Italian club, Varese, offered Antetokounmpo a two-year deal worth $550,000 with an opt-out to join the NBA after one year. Olympiakos in Greece and Sevilla in Spain also offered him deals. “Amazing isn’t it?," Lotsos told The Post in a phone call from Greece. “To my surprise, he passed on it. He’s very ambitious and determined to make the NBA. It’s a big sacrifice. It could’ve really put him ahead of schedule in his career. I didn’t try to force him. I wanted him to make his own decision." ... His agent said Thanasis is still “hopeful’’ a roster spot could open late in the season via trades.
  • Matthew Glenesk of The Indianapolis Star: Frank Vogel continued that he was confident George Hill will rise to the challenge, noting the former IUPUI and Broad Ripple star has worked harder this offseason than at any point in his career. So what exactly does that hard work look like? The folks at PEAK Sports USA posted a video of the Pacers point guard working on all facets of his game in the gym and in the weight room. The name of the workout is 'Monster Discipline', which shouldn't be confused with Hill's affinity for Animal Planet's 'River Monsters.' Hill averaged 10.3 points, 3.5 assists and 3.7 rebounds a game last season, starting all 76 games he appeared in. Hill will get some help in the backcourt from Donald Sloan, C.J. Watson and new signings C.J. Miles and Rodney Stuckey.
  • Charles F. Gardner of the Journal Sentinel: Larry Drew said he was "blindsided" by the way he lost his job as head coach of the Milwaukee Bucks. Commenting at length for the first time since he was fired by the Bucks' new ownership June 30, Drew said his firing was "definitely mystifying." The veteran coach lasted just one season in Milwaukee and was replaced by former Brooklyn Nets coach Jason Kidd. Even as Drew was taking part in draft preparations with the Bucks management staff in late June, team owners Wesley Edens and Marc Lasry were starting their talks with Kidd. ... Maybe the most embarrassing snub Drew suffered was having to sit at the introductory news conference with No. 2 overall pick Jabari Parker at the Milwaukee Public Market on the day after the draft, even though the owners already had talked to Kidd by that time. "The whole Jabari thing, putting me in that position, I don't think it was very professional," Drew said. "I wish it wouldn't have happened that way, but it did. If I had been a new coach, I might have reacted differently (to the firing). But because I've been in this so long and I've had friends who have had these type things happen to them, I was OK. This is the life we choose and sometimes you have to expect the unexpected." Last week, Drew was hired as an assistant by Cleveland Cavaliers coach David Blatt. The Bucks will continue to pay Drew for the next two seasons and that compensation will be offset by whatever pay he is receiving from the Cavaliers.
  • Chris Fedor of The Plain Dealer: Zydrunas Ilgauskas thinking about a comeback? Ilgauskas is 39 and has been retired for three years. Last season, the Cavs had a touching ceremony, attended by LeBron James, where Ilgauskas had his number raised to the rafters inside Quicken Loans Arena. But now that James is back, Ilgauskas could be ready for a return, according to ESPN Cleveland radio host Tony Rizzo, who first talked about an Ilgauskas return on his TV program, The Rizzo Show, late Sunday night. Rizzo then reiterated it on Monday morning.
  • Paul Coro of The Arizona Republic: For Suns-starved fans, the sight of Goran Dragic playing basketball again Tuesday would be satisfying if it was not August and a meaningless friendly game between Dragic's Slovenian national team and the U.S. That chance to see him on ESPN2 at 11 a.m. Arizona time might conjure images of Dragic's ankle bending like a green twig last season. Dragic's extensive offseason of national-team work was blamed, in part, for his injuries and fatigue. ... Dragic still might be seen more than Derrick Rose on Tuesday, but the agreement has been for Dragic to be kept to one practice per day and no more than 25 minutes of playing time in exhibition appearances. The Suns and his agents agreed to bump his exhibition appearances from three to five, which still keeps him out of most of Slovenia's 16 exhibitions. "You have to be ready and be fair," said Rade Filipovic, who represents Dragic along with agent Bill Duffy. "We don't want him to be burned out or injured. Everyone is concerned or cautious." ... Suns General Manager Ryan McDonough talked Monday to Dragic, who also said that he is "fresh." McDonough said Filipovic, Duffy, the Slovenians and the Suns have cooperated to execute a mutually beneficial plan.
  • John Canzano of The Oregonian: USA Basketball cut Portland Trail Blazers guard Damian Lillard and kept Derrick Rose. Tough decisions have to be made. But what I'm most interested in is what happens next. Because if I know Lillard as well as I think I do, I'm thinking USA Basketball just did Portland an interesting favor. Some athletes are motivated by money, marketing and exposure. Some are driven by legacy. But anyone who has followed Lillard's story from Oakland to Weber State to the NBA All-Star team knows that he is a man driven by proving himself. I think Lillard needs to elevate his game, especially on defense. He's a sensational offensive player, with great vision and feel that you just can't teach. He's quick, he has an excellent shot, and he possesses outstanding instinct. But I'm most fascinated by his work ethic, and the fact that he appears most motivated when he's doubted.
  • Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle: James Harden offered a moment of candor about how he thinks, about how top players have to think. ESPN’s Scoop Jackson asked “In your mind, who is the best basketball player alive right now?” Harden answered “myself.” In his mind, he is supposed to think that way. He might not even be the best basketball player on his team (Howard was a much better offensive player than Harden was a defensive player last season), but he is expected to think of himself as unstoppable. He is expected at times to convince himself that no one can be his equal, no matter what mental gymnastics it takes to come to that conclusion. This was no slip on unintended candor. Later that same day, while doing an interview to promote the NBA 2K15 video game, Harden declared more directly “I’m the best all-around basketball player in the NBA.” This is actually nothing new for the Rockets. There was a segment of fans that believed that the Rockets had the best basketball player alive on the roster last season, too, but he has since been traded to the Lakers. Harden, however, actually said it. And unlike his little talk about the Rockets’ offseason, when he seemed to diminish teammates as “pieces” around the cornerstones, he did not even have the out of his declaration being true. Humility has its place, but the Rockets are better off with Harden seeking greatness on the highest levels of his sport.
  • Perry A. Farrell of the Detroit Free Press: Spencer Dinwiddie was “The Mayor" at Colorado. When it came to his college choice, though, the Pistons’ 6-foot-6 rookie point guard had to decide between the Buffaloes and Harvard. Either pick would have been great, but the competition in the Pac-12 was too much for the Los Angeles native to pass up. He recently talked with former Piston Rick Mahorn and discussed his decision on the Pistons’ website. “Both of those schools recruited me in depth, and I loved both programs,” Dinwiddie said. “I wanted to test my talents against the Pac-12. I wanted to stay closer to home, and I wanted to prove to people that didn’t recruit me as hard that I was the player me and my family thought I was. Obviously, growing up on the West Coast, the Pac-12 is the conference you think about going to. When only a couple of them came calling and a lot of them didn’t like me in the same fashion, and when it came down to those two choices, I said: ‘You know what?’ I felt like I was an NBA player, and that was something I wanted to prove." The Pistons took a chance on the big point guard, drafting him but holding him out of the summer league in hopes of having him ready for the start of training camp. With Dinwiddie and 6-5 Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, the Pistons could have their backcourt of the future.
  • Fred Kerber of the New York Post: Now you can truthfully say the K-Love traded from Minnesota to Cleveland is all arms. Not all arms and legs, mind you, just arms. That’s because “K-Love,” the name for an octopus that was named after forward Kevin Love, has been traded from SEA LIFE Minnesota Aquarium at the Mall of America to the Greater Cleveland Aquarium, which surrendered rights to the name of its octopus, Ocho. On the surface – and even underwater — this trade looks like Frank Robinson for Milt Pappas all over again. The real Kevin Love went from the Minnesota Timberwolves to the Cleveland Cavs as part of a blockbuster three-team trade also involving Philadelphia over the weekend. So while that Kevin Love gets to play with LeBron James, the all-arms K-Love, a giant Pacific octopus, will sleep with the fishes. The folks at SEA LIFE noted “the name, K-Love, should follow his human counterpart in the trade to Cleveland. The memories Kevin Love has given the Timberwolves will stay in Minnesota, and the octopus will be staying at SEA LIFE Minnesota as well.” So the deal was for the name only, thus avoiding what could have been a very emotional clutch-and-grab farewell. Already there is talk the name “Ocho” will be disbanded by the Minnesota aquarium in favor of something to honor Andrew Wiggins, the biggest return in the trade for Minnesota. Under consideration: Sqwiggins, Iggy and A-W. Not surprisingly, no one proposed “Andrew” or “Andy.”

Religious issues on the court

August, 25, 2014
Aug 25
1:01
PM ET
Abbott By Henry Abbott
ESPN.com
Archive
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FIBA rules ban some forms of religious wear, including the hijab. ESPN's Chad Ford, an expert on such issues in his day job as a professor, says repealing the ban would be a great idea.

First Cup: Monday

August, 25, 2014
Aug 25
5:13
AM ET
By Nick Borges
ESPN.com
Archive
  • Gary Washburn of The Boston Globe: Having spent an injury-free summer working out and feeling rewarded by the Celtics’ surprising long-term investment, Avery Bradley said he is determined to live up to expectations. “I’m motivated to be the best teammate I can be,” he said. “One thing I want to improve this year is I want to get my teammates involved a little bit more [by passing the ball]. I know that’s something I can get better at, especially because the game’s slowing down for me. I’m willing to do whatever it takes.” Bradley came into the NBA following his freshman season at the University of Texas a bright-eyed 19-year-old, but he is now the second-most tenured Celtic behind Rajon Rondo. And he laughs when told that rookie Marcus Smart is 3 years his junior and James Young is nearly five. “I remember KG [ Kevin Garnett] and those guys would tell me, 10 years is going to go by like that and I’m already five years in,” he said. “It hits home for sure because I’m taking a leadership role. I’m open to taking it and not only that, I’m excited to take it. I feel like I can teach the younger guys a lot, all the stuff that I’ve been through, all the stuff that I’ve learned from the amazing players I was blessed enough to play with.” Bradley and Rondo are the Celtics’ projected starting backcourt and the two have grown closer over the years.
  • Bob Cooney of the Philadelphia Daily News: The three-team trade that became official on Saturday, sending Thaddeus Young to the Minnesota Timberwolves and bringing the Sixers two expiring contracts and a first-round draft pick, enhanced the plan that general manager Sam Hinkie has put into place. There is no now. There is only the future. ... How does this transaction help the Sixers for the upcoming season? Probably not much. How will it help them in the future? It's another stockpiling of assets by Hinkie. When those assets will pay dividends is anyone's guess right now.
  • Sid Hartman of the Star Tribune: While most of the local media attention in the Timberwolves’ trade of Kevin Love to the Cavaliers has focused on the arrival of No. 1 overall pick Andrew Wiggins, Flip Saunders believes that Anthony Bennett and Thaddeus Young will play crucial roles with the team, as well. Bennett was the No. 1 overall pick in 2013 but had a rough rookie year. Saunders believes a lot of that is in the past. “He has good potential,” said the Wolves president and coach. “He played very well this summer, was one of the better big men really at Vegas at the Summer League.” ... But Saunders said Young was about more than just production. “He is a borderline All-Star,” he said. “There has been a lot of speculation about why would you trade for him and give up a first-round pick that is in the 20s to bring him in? Here are the things, we didn’t have a power forward on our board that had started an NBA game. The other thing is, going back I saw how [Kevin] Garnett developed, how [Stephon] Marbury developed, how [Wally] Szczerbiak developed, we always had mentors with those players." ... Saunders added that while Young, who is only two months older than Love, can be a free agent next season, he hopes he can convince him that Minnesota is the best place for his career. But the Wolves will have flexibility either way, because if Young departs, they can use his loss of salary to add another free agent.
  • Chris Fedor of The Plain Dealer: It was something neither Mike Miller nor James Jones wanted to admit when they were introduced as free agents for the Cleveland Cavaliers two weeks ago. LeBron James has dodged it, instead hoping to focus on the "process." General Manager David Griffin won't say it either. But after the Cavs' most recent move in what has become a landmark off-season, there's only one thing that will make the 2014-15 season a success: an NBA championship. ... Thanks to biggest transformation the league has seen in one off-season, the Cavs, winners of 97 games the last four years, have gone from Eastern Conference doormat to the upper echelon of the NBA, and there's no reason for them to not win the title this season. Getting to the playoffs is not enough. Neither is getting to the Finals. The talent has been acquired. The pieces fit perfectly. Now there's one thing left, and it's something the franchise has never done before: win the NBA championship. Anything less would be a disappointment.
  • Anthony Slater of The Oklahoman: More than any other NBA franchise, the Thunder has steadily utilized its D-League program the past six years. And it’s produced a ton of success stories. But that hasn’t just been limited to the players who have made brief stops. It extends to the sidelines, where a handful of the coaches and support staff have used Thunder U as a career springboard. On Friday afternoon, the Thunder announced the hiring of Florida assistant Mark Daigneault as the next head coach of its D-League team, which relocated from Tulsa to OKC this offseason and has yet to determine its name. ... Most signs would indicate Daigneault might not be long for this position. He’s a rapid riser. And that’s just how the Thunder likes it. The three guys who held this gig before Daigneault – Nate Tibbetts, Dale Osbourne and Darko Rajakovic – all immediately ascended to assistant coaching positions in the NBA. Tibbetts and Osbourne are currently with the Blazers. Rajakovic was hired as the Thunder’s newest assistant this offseason. It’s a ton of turnover for one position. But it’s the good kind.
  • Barry Jackson of The Miami Herald: One veteran NBA scout said Michael Beasley is a far better player than journeyman Shawne Williams and questioned the Heat for signing Williams to guaranteed money. So why hasn’t the Heat tried to re-sign Beasley when it could use his offense? A person with direct knowledge cited several reasons for the Heat's lack of interest: Inconsistency, lack of trust in his defense (and ability to execute the Heat's defensive system), and maturity/focus issues, which are still a concern even though he improved somewhat in that regard last season. I would give Beasley another shot at the minimum; he ranked in the top 52 in points-per-48 minutes last season and the Heat might regret not having his offense this season if Dwyane Wade or Danny Granger is injured. Beasley would have interest in returning if the Heat calls. But essentially, this comes down to lack of trust by the Heat coaching staff after working with Beasley for nine months. It spoke volumes that the Heat instead prefered a player (Williams) who has had just one good NBA season (2010-11 for the Knicks) and spent much of last season in the Developmental League.
  • Dan McCarney of the San Antonio Express-News: With the likes of Boris Diaw, Patty Mills and Matt Bonner having earned new contracts, the lone member of the Spurs’ 2014 championship team yet to re-sign is restricted free agent center Aron Baynes. Well-known Turkish sportscaster Ismael Senol tweeted on Sunday that while Baynes hopes to return to San Antonio, he’s also begun to explore options overseas in the hopes of signing for at least $1.5 million Euros. Baynes, 27, has been a marginal contributor since joining the Spurs in Jan. 2013. He averaged 3.0 points and 2.7 rebounds with a 9.7 Player Efficiency Rating — 15.0 is average — in 53 appearances last season. ... They commonly keep a slot open for flexibility. Indeed, that same approach that could spell the end of Baynes’ stint in San Antonio is what allowed the Spurs to add him in the first place as a project from Europe.
  • Ben Standig of CSN Washington: If the idea of going to the gym on a Saturday morning sounds comparable to having root canal procedure during a tax audit, here's some motivation from one of the newest Washington Wizards: Paul Pierce posted video of himself running sprints uphill on sand dunes in Malibu. ... If you can't tell, the Los Angeles native is working out in Wizards gear. ... Training camp opens next month. What are you waiting for?

Free, Love: The liberated T-Wolves

August, 23, 2014
Aug 23
5:50
PM ET
Adande By J.A. Adande
ESPN.com
Archive
The only thing we know with certainty is that Aug. 23, 2014, marks the date of the liberation of the Minnesota Timberwolves. We don’t know yet if it will go down as the day the Cleveland Cavaliers acquired their final championship component, or the day the Timberwolves landed the Next Big Thing. Too many variables involved to be sure. But go ahead and rejoice in the freedom of the Timberwolves. They’re freed from expectations, freed from conventional NBA style and most of all freed from that most hellish of NBA locales, the Cape of Mediocrity.

There was all of this pressure to get good or lose Kevin Love. Fret no more. Now they’ve lost him, even though it turned out they weren’t that good with him. Their best record in Love’s six seasons in Minnesota was this season’s 40-42 -- and there’s not much worse in the NBA than being 40-42. That’s not good enough to be a contender, not bad enough to have a good shot at getting a top draft pick in the lottery.

Now there’s no need for them to get good right away. Flip Saunders is in his first year back as coach. He also happens to be the GM. He’s not on the hot seat, he just did the ice bucket challenge.

With Andrew Wiggins and Zach LaVine flying through the air and Ricky Rubio throwing them lob passes, the Timberwolves have a chance to be the most entertaining team in the league. They never were going to be that with Love. Even though I could spend entire summer afternoons watching this Love outlet GIF -- it’s that mesmerizing -- Love doesn’t make you jump out of your seat and immediately start texting your buddies.

And if the best thing the Timberwolves have to offer is style, maybe they can play in a way that runs counter to the NBA trend of jacking up 3-pointers all the time. Last season they were one of the worst 3-point shooting teams in the NBA (ranking 26th), but that didn’t stop them from attempting just as many 3s as the league leader in 3-point percentage, the San Antonio Spurs. Love was the biggest culprit, and his 505 3-point attempts were more than all but five players in the league.

Wiggins wasn’t a stellar 3-point shooter in college and Anthony Bennett made only 10 as a rookie last season. They should be attacking the hoop and leaving the 3s to Kevin Martin. Scrap the layups/3s/free throws model the rest of the league operates under and go for dunks/dunks/more dunks.

Minnesota’s good luck should be our good luck ... and it all starts with Cleveland’s good luck. Has anyone ever benefited more from someone else’s good fortune than the Timberwolves? Usually premium talent becomes available because something went wrong. Clashes with management, attitude issues, contractual stalemates. In this case Minnesota had a chance to cash in because so much went right for Cleveland. The Cavaliers landed No. 1 pick after No. 1 pick, and then the best player in the game returned because he got homesick. So the Cavaliers had the motivation to accelerate their winning window and the means to get Love with that ultra-rare offer of back-to-back No. 1 picks.

I’d much rather have rookie contracts than expiring contracts (which is primarily what Minnesota sent to Philadelphia, along with a first-round pick from Miami, to get Love fill-in Thaddeus Young). If the Timberwolves so desire, they can have Wiggins and Bennett for a combined $53 million over the next four years. Compare that to, say, Eric Gordon on a $58 million deal over four years.

When the Timberwolves first came to grips with the likelihood they’d have to trade Love they couldn’t have imagined they would end up with the top pick in the most anticipated draft in years. They’ve got a player with the talent to become a star. Even if Wiggins’ potential goes unfulfilled, at least the Timberwolves are unburdened.

Spurs picked as title favorites in 2014-15

August, 22, 2014
Aug 22
5:26
PM ET
Abbott By Henry Abbott
ESPN.com
Archive
Gregg Popovich's team was the fifth-most likely to win it all last season, but with hardly any roster changes, they're the favorites this time around.

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