The Fortunate 500: Don't hate -- motivate

September, 15, 2014
Sep 15
2:00
PM ET
Strauss By Ethan Sherwood Strauss
ESPN.com
Archive
Bryant/AnthonyRobyn Beck/AFP/Getty ImagesKobe Bryant and Carmelo Anthony have both felt the cold sting of their #NBArank positions.
#NBArank isn't just a window into how all the league's players might stack up against one another. It's also motivational fuel for the athletes who feel slighted.

It's funny how players take umbrage about a score based on a collection of surveys. There's no one person to get angry at -- unless you subscribe to the belief that "ESPN" is a discrete individual.

Professional athletes are good at this, though. They're masters at taking dry, detached assessments and converting those into grievous insults that must be disproven. Write something that you think is a mostly positive assessment of an athlete and you're liable to get "I'll show you" where you might have expected "That was a balanced take on me." Getting to the top comes with a fair amount of pride and a gnawing need to prove oneself. As someone more defined by "laptop" than "the top," I'm often surprised by how reflexively athletes take negative information to heart.

Perhaps, per the rankings, there's just something so cold about a man listed as a number. It's tough, in a way, to see Kobe Bryant's entire career reduced to "25" in last year's NBA rank results. "Just a number" describes how people are treated in vast, impersonal systems. It seems as if a few NBA players strive to be more than just their allotted ranking number. Maybe they don't even have a specific goal. They would just like to shed the unflattering numerical definition of their talent.

Kobe Bryant appeared to include his "25" ranking in his Twitter handle. The vast majority of caterwauling over Kobe's ranking was done by fellow players and fans. Another way of defining those offended by Kobe's ranking is, "People who dismiss the importance of the Achilles tendon."

The Mamba didn't come out and prove all the #NBArank haters and doubters wrong. Unfortunately, Kobe's human, and his hasty return from a devastating injury resulted in uneven play and another injury.

Even other superstars aren't immune. In 2011, Carmelo Anthony saw himself outside the top 10 (at No. 12!) and took to social media to tell the world of his newfound motivation. (It didn't necessarily take. Melo has yo-yoed in #NBArank, falling to No. 17 in 2012 and rising to No. 15 in 2013.)

Ranking rancor went a bit better for Kent Bazemore, who wrote his 2012 #NBArank listing of "499" on his shoe. Thanks in part to a Summer League MVP performance Bazemore was able to move up 167 spots. He thanked the rankers for his progress, while expressing hope that he could prove us wrong once again.

Lavoy Allen was a temporary #NBArank motivation success story. After getting tagged with the dreaded rank of "500" in 2011, Allen helped the Sixers on a strong playoff run. Actually, I shouldn't say "temporary." Last year, Allen managed to finally escape what's become of the Sixers. That's a certain kind of success.

Jeremy Lin's trainer was yelling his 2011 #NBArank number ("467!") at Lin during workouts. Such tactics must have worked because Lin made the biggest jump of any player to 76 the next season. Oh, also Linsanity happened.

There might have been a correlation between that national phenomenon and the ranking boost. Last season, Lin slid back into a ranking of 106. It might be time for his trainer to revisit old routines.

All these players should be content to be in the top 500 and to simply be involved in the world's best basketball league. But if these guys were content with such a distinction, they wouldn't have gotten this far in the first place.

TrueHoop TV Live

September, 15, 2014
Sep 15
12:48
PM ET
Elhassan By Amin Elhassan
ESPN.com
Archive
We're talking #NBArank and more, starting at 2 p.m. ET.

Why #NBArank hates big men

September, 15, 2014
Sep 15
12:45
PM ET
Abbott By Henry Abbott
ESPN.com
Archive
Why are so many quality big men at the bottom of ESPN.com's #NBArank list? We ask Ethan Sherwood Strauss.

video

First Cup: Monday

September, 15, 2014
Sep 15
5:06
AM ET
By Nick Borges
ESPN.com
Archive
  • Peter Botte of the New York Daily News: Knicks star Carmelo Anthony believes racially charged statements attributed to Atlanta owner Bruce Levenson and GM Danny Ferry will dissuade NBA free agents from signing with the Hawks in the future. “(There) ain’t nobody (who) would want to go there,” Anthony told reporters Saturday at his basketball camp in Manhattan. “At the end of the day, Atlanta, I think it puts Atlanta back even further now, from that standpoint. Atlanta is a great city, a great market, great people, great atmosphere. But as far as the comments (that) were made, I think it was uncalled for. From an owner, from a GM, those are not things you play with.” Ferry took an indefinite leave of absence on Friday, after comments he made earlier this summer about then-free agent Luol Deng surfaced this week, and the Hawks issued an open letter of apology to their fans and the city of Atlanta on Saturday.
  • Mike Wise of The Washington Post: Having covered the league up close and peripherally for 20-plus years, nowhere have those conversations been more transparent than the NBA. Sterling’s removal as owner of the Clippers was a no-brainer. He had a long, documented history of racist remarks and discriminatory behavior in his businesses. But if the goal suddenly becomes playing “Gotcha,” lopping off heads for the sake of finding every potential racist among us, we miss a huge opportunity to drive deeper conversations about the very elements of society that polarize us. ... I don’t know if Danny Ferry has a sinister element inside him that has affected his personnel decisions over the years. But making him go away forever is not going to help anyone find out. I found it ironic, for instance, that Ferry basically ascribed being “African” to also being “two-faced,” when, in fact, part of any NBA general manager’s job is being duplicitous with his peers. If Danny Ferry allowed every other GM to know exactly what he wanted at the draft and the trade deadline, he would be snookered out of the league.
  • Gary Washburn of The Boston Globe: And in a strange twist, new executive director Michele Roberts begins her term Monday, having to deal with unsavory comments by a general manager about a player and an owner who made racial remarks discussing attendance at Hawks games. Former executive director Charles Grantham, who served from 1978-95, had some strong opinions about potential reaction from the NBA Players Association just months after then-Clippers owner Donald Sterling’s statements during the playoffs. Sterling was forced to sell the franchise. ... Grantham believes this issue is a lack of diversity in management and ownership. ... Roberts, who was named to her post in July, has been preparing for her tenure and will be greeted with two racial issues before training camps even begin. Atlanta has never been a highly desirable destination for premium free agents, and now could be completely discounted if Ferry remains. “And going forward, how many players, since we’re an 80 percent black league, are going to be poisoned in a similar way?” Grantham said. “And is this a collusive moment to maintain or reduce his value in the marketplace?” In other words, are teams sharing negative information on players to reduce their free agent worth? That is a serious charge, and Ferry reportedly received that information on Deng from another club and then mentioned it on a recorded conference call.
  • Michael Grange of Sportsnet.ca: Big crowds of fans from non-traditional basketball countries like Korea, New Zealand and Finland gave the event an international taste as well. But it’s hard to imagine the FIBA World Cup capturing the attention of sports audiences with a fervor approaching soccer — well, ever to be frank — but particularly until some other basketball countries emerge as realistic challengers to the current world order. Even in the U.S. there wasn’t all that excitement about Team USA – the gold-medal final was swamped by NFL coverage. In contrast, the World Cup of soccer had the U.S. in rapt attention even after Team USA lost. I would argue the nature of soccer — low scores, the opportunity for weaker teams to clog up the game and the puncher’s chance provided by set pieces or penalty kicks — means that an upset is always possibly, even if unlikely. As well, the lack of a single dominant country means a much higher level of engagement globally. Every World Cup has four to six teams that could realistically win and twice as many that can fantasize about it. Basketball only has countries dreaming of second place. Could it ever change?
  • A. Sherrod Blakely of CSNNE.com: Gordon Hayward has never been one to hesitate giving props to Brad Stevens, his not-so-old college coach at Butler who now coaches the Boston Celtics. So it shouldn't come as that big a surprise that when discussing this past summer with Team USA, he had to slip in a line or two about Stevens. "It was great being able to work with some of the talented players and coaches on the team," Hayward said on his website. "Coach Krzyzewski and Coach Thibodeau are very detail oriented — very similar to Brad Stevens, my coach at Butler. They make sure you’re focused on everything being sharp and precise. When we practiced, they weren’t necessarily long practices, but it was intense. I like that. When you practice, it should be focused and tough training."
  • Phil Mackey of 1500ESPN.com: Ricky Rubio has gotten stronger and sturdier in his upper body, per the request of Timberwolves officials. It'll be interesting to see how much Rubio improved this offseason. He spent the summer playing with fellow Spanish stars Pau and Marc Gasol, Serge Ibaka and others (although Spain lost in the quarterfinals of the FIBA World Cup, which was considered a huge disappointment). Rubio's scoring production was underwhelming in the tournament (he shot just 32%), but he averaged 10 assists, 9 rebounds and 7 steals per 40 minutes. If Rubio can make more shots at the rim and add some semblance of a mid-range game, he'll have a chance to be one of the better point guards in the NBA. But those are big ifs.
  • Tony Jones of The Salt Lake Tribune: Derrick Favors knows that it’s time to turn potential into production. But it’s easy to forget that he’s still young. There are incoming rookies — former Pleasant Grove star C.J. Wilcox for one — who are older than Favors. But heading into his fifth season, the Jazz big man knows that he needs to expand his offensive game and continue to evolve into a defensive and rebounding force at the other end of the floor. To that end, Favors’ off-season has been dedicated to expanding the range on his jumper, adding moves with his back to the basket and losing weight. Favors is expected to play center in Snyder’s new offense. Largely gone are the days of him occupying the low post. Much of his time will be spent playing pick-and-roll basketball with the guards. "When I was younger, I would try to dunk on everyone," Favors said. "But I know that’s not possible all the time." Favors is also morphing into a team leader. He showed up at Utah’s summer league scrimmage this year, sat in on film sessions with that team and has been a regular at the practice facility.
  • Barry Jackson of The Miami Herald: A Heat official said even beyond Erik Spoelstra’s staff changes, “you will see some tweaks in how we play.” The team’s gambling defense, which left open too many three-point shooters, needs addressing. “We can’t just show up and expect to win it in the fourth quarter any more,” the Heat official said. Haslem said he, Chalmers, Wade, Norris Cole and Josh McRoberts had a productive recent bonding session, over several days, in Bloomington, Ind., doing on-court work with Hoosiers coach Tom Crean, Wade's friend and former coach at Marquette. “I’m sure there are a lot of people counting us out, a lot of people not expecting much from us,” Haslem said. “We still think we can be highly competitive. We still think we have a chance to compete for the Eastern Conference title. I’ve spoken to D-Wade and CB. We’re excited about the challenge. We are highly motivated. But we are motivated in a good way. It’s not being bitter. It’s about ‘LeBron’s gone’ and we’ve got to pick up the slack."

The sneaker wars

September, 12, 2014
Sep 12
3:41
PM ET
Strauss By Ethan Sherwood Strauss
ESPN.com
Archive
Sneaker expert Eddie Maisonet joins us to explain the shoe wars over top talents like Kevin Durant.

video

Is basketball really a global game?

September, 12, 2014
Sep 12
3:04
PM ET
Strauss By Ethan Sherwood Strauss
ESPN.com
Archive
videoTeam USA has been squashing the competition at the FIBA Basketball World Cup, and with Spain knocked off, Mike Krzyzewski’s squad has an easy road to the title.

Really, I should be celebrating on behalf of my countrymen, praising Tom Thibodeau’s defense, heralding America’s ability to persevere through injuries and absences. Instead, I’m lamenting over how overmatched the rest of the world is.

It’s one thing when Team USA’s Olympic juggernaut (LeBron James, Kevin Durant, Chris Paul, Kevin Love) runs roughshod over its FIBA foes. Anthony Davis was the 12th man on that squad two years ago. But to do this while half-trying? To best the earth with your C team? It speaks to how basketball might not be as global as we were promised.

There was a time around the mid-2000s when America’s basketball decline was a fait accompli. “The rest of the world has caught up,” is what we told ourselves. In 2002, Team USA finished sixth in the FIBA World Championship. The 2003 NBA All-Star Game featured a record five international players, including Yao Ming, symbol of China’s imminent growth into a world basketball power. A year later, Team USA suffered a humiliating defeat in the Olympics, somehow failing to win gold despite featuring plenty of Stephon Marbury. In the 2006 FIBA World Championship, the U.S. was upset by tiny Greece.

America’s basketball demise wasn’t exactly framed as a failure, either. David Stern was keen to promote his promotion of basketball on the global level. This was the natural consequence of the game conquering abroad. Blame the Dream Team, for they had dazzled the world into jerseys and sneakers.

The NBA tells a certain story about itself, about how it’s a global sport on the march. Today, China. Tomorrow, India. Basketball is constantly engaged in a benign imperial conquest of people across the ocean. That story lives on because it’s in part true -- there are basketball leagues over all the world. The story also lives on because it’s vague. We don’t quite have a handle on TV ratings abroad.

Can that story stand up to recent scrutiny, though? The onslaught of international superstars hasn’t arrived. Last year’s All-Star Game featured three internationals, and two also claim American citizenship (Tony Parker, Joakim Noah). It seems that Yao Ming was more a generational talent than a harbinger of China’s fast-approaching hoops dominance. After Yao retired, many of his countrymen found hobbies that weren’t televised hoops.

It is difficult to measure world interest in basketball, but these FIBA games may hint at how invested these other countries are in the sport -- just as our relative weakness in soccer is indicative of how we care relatively less about it.

The story the NBA tells itself about the emerging, globalizing force of basketball is a good one, and I wish it were completely true. I love how the 2014 champion San Antonio Spurs dominated with an international approach. The sport is better for diversifying, for absorbing perspectives and approaches from all over. AAU camps now teach American kids the Eurostep because Manu Ginobili brought his diagonal stylings to the NBA.

As thrilling as the collectivist Spurs are, they don’t boast potential international stars. Kawhi Leonard is from the Inland Empire. The horizon isn’t replete with young Manus, Yaos and Dirks.

Sadly, Team USA’s success represents a failure of basketball on the global level -- for now, at least. The sport hasn’t grown by leaps as it seemed it would in the mid-2000s. The NBA still uses the story of world conquest as a bulwark for the insecurity caused by football’s stateside dominance. That narrative can’t survive so many Team USA victories.

First Cup: Friday

September, 12, 2014
Sep 12
5:10
AM ET
By Nick Borges
ESPN.com
Archive
  • J. Michael of CSN Washington: No matter how much player personnel reps for teams warn players of missteps such as this on social media with hot-button issues such as Rice's, they continually happen. A few years ago Kenyon Martin, who later claim his account was hacked, wished his alleged "haters" to "catch full blown AIDS and die." When Michael Vick went through his issue the federal government regarding dog fighting that led to jail time, athletes kept stepping into land mines with comments and social media in defense of Vick and by criticizing him. Despite traveling the globe, a lot of players, especially the young ones such as Paul George (24), aren't as savvy or as informed as you'd think. Social media probably isn't the best place to engage in off-color chatter with friends about sensitive and complex issues such as race, domestic violence, politics or even world peace. ... At least George took responsibility for his comments and didn't claim that his account was hacked. The rule of thumb is if you're not comfortable shouting it in front of a group of mostly strangers, which is what social media is, then it's not a good idea to tweet it.
  • Michael Pointer of The Indianapolis Star: Katherine Redmond Brown has come to expect the attitude reflected in Paul George's tweets regarding suspended NFL running back Ray Rice on Thursday morning. "Professional and college athletes have a very different culture than the rest of us do," said Redmond, who founded the National Coalition Against Violent Athletes after reaching a settlement with the University of Nebraska due to an attack by a football player and is married to a former NFL running back. "That's what I try to get across." ... Redmond said the best way to change someone's attitude towards domestic violence is to expose them to victims. She shares her story when she speaks to athletes. She says she was attacked by former Nebraska football player Christian Peter during her freshman year at the school in 1991, but waited several months after the attack to notify authorities and no criminal charges were filed. Redmond later filed a Title IX lawsuit against the school and Peter, and reached a settlement in 1997. She started the ACAVA a few months later. Two years ago, she returned to her alma mater — which she graduated from in 3 years despite battling bulimia — and spoke to the football team. Her husband is a former teammate of Peter's at Nebraska. She said her own story often proves powerful enough, but she will bring along other victims if needed. She suggests the Pacers and other pro teams try the same thing. "I've had (players) come up to me with tears in their eyes and say, 'My sister or my mom went through this,' " she said, " 'and I minimized it.'"
  • Mark Bradley of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Maybe you believe that Michael Gearon Jr., one of the Atlanta Hawks’ many owners, is waging a campaign to oust Danny Ferry as general manager. Even if we concede that point, we’re left with this: Ferry spoke insensitive words in a business setting about Luol Deng, whom the Hawks were considering for employment. The audio tape obtained by esteemed colleague Chris Vivlamore underscores what Adrian Wojnarowski’s review for Yahoo! Sports of a written transcript of the June conference call suggested: It doesn’t sound as if Ferry was, as the Hawks have maintained, reading from a background report. If that was the entirety of the Hawks’ defense — and by “the Hawks,” we mean in this case CEO Steve Koonin and Ferry, as opposed to the splinter group of Gearon and the team’s other Atlanta-based owners — the audio tape renders it inoperative. Hearing the tape, it’s hard to believe Ferry was speaking words someone else had written. Ergo, it’s hard to imagine a scenario in which he remains general manager. ... But I do think Ferry, who a week ago I considered the best GM this franchise has had over the 30 years I’ve worked here, will be leaving soon. I see no way back from this.
  • Mark Kiszla of The Denver Post: This tourney has been the Manimal's coming-out party. Hello, world. The name recognition might well force him into future all-star consideration. And it will get Faried paid. If center JaVale McGee's salary with the Nuggets is $11.25 million this season, how can Faried possibly be worth a penny less? For Team USA, Faried does all the dirty work, from cleaning the boards to sprinting out on the break. His relentless, happy pursuit of a gold medal makes you proud to be an American. Heck, when a chippy semifinal game, punctuated by Lithuanian center Jonas Valaciunas throwing an elbow at the neck of DeMarcus Cousins, erupted into a heated little tussle during the postgame handshake line, Faried came to the rescue, pulling 67-year-old coach Mike Krzyzewski from the fray. "He's too old for that stuff," Faried said. "I told him: 'Just chill. I've got you, Coach.'" The World Cup championship is one victory away. Sleep easy, America. The Manimal's got your back.
  • A. Sherrod Blakely of CSNNE.com: The Celtics added some legit NBA talent this offseason via trades (Marcus Thornton, Tyler Zeller), the draft (Marcus Smart, James Young) and free agency (Evan Turner). But of those five players, the biggest surprise may wind up being Thornton for several reasons. For starters, many assume he'll be traded because he's in the final year of his contract and the Celtics have way, way, WAY too many guards to speak of. But as you look at this roster and look at all those guards, keeping Thornton around for a while - OK, at least past Christmas - makes a lot of sense. Reflecting upon last season, one of the biggest problems Boston had was finding someone to score the ball. Jeff Green had his moments as most - including LeBron James - can attest to. Ditto for Avery Bradley who parlayed a strong season shooting the ball into a four-year, $32 million contract this summer. So with a lack of scoring consistency in the starting lineup, the punch delivered by the reserves was just as erratic. It remains to be seen if Thornton is the answer to the Celtics' scoring woes, but one thing we do know. He can only help.
  • Michael Florek of The Dallas Morning News: Mavericks owner Mark Cuban hasn’t been shy with his opinion that NBA players shouldn’t be playing in international competition. Yet, Chandler Parsons, his new addition, went to the USA basketball training camp this spring and was one of the last players cut from the team that’s currently playing in the FIBA World Cup. It was simply something Parsons wanted to do. According to Parsons, Cuban explained his feelings directly to the forward. “He made that clear to me,” Parsons said. “He did. He’s great. If there’s any issue or any conversation that needs to be had I’m having it with Mark. … He obviously told me how he felt. He told the world how he felt about his guys playing for USA basketball. But at the same time he understood it was something that I was really passionate about and it was something that I really wanted to do. I think I got better going there and I got in shape. Just being able to play against those guys every single day, it’s not often that you get to learn and play and practice with those type of players every single day in the summertime.” When asked whether he would consider playing in international competition in the future, Parsons was noncommittal.
  • Rusty Simmons of the San Francisco Chronicle: Imagine this: Davidson didn’t record Stephen Curry’s turnovers in 2006-07, and the college didn’t differentiate between the future Warriors point guard’s offensive or defensive rebounds or count his personal fouls through 2008-09. Five years later, that sounds absurd. Everything is charted these days. Every box score number is mandated, advanced statistics are commonplace, and optical analytics are all the rage in the NBA. The evidence of the rising importance of analytics stood out this week, when 11 NBA teams sent 27 representatives to the Sports Analytics Innovation Summit in San Francisco. Of the 27 reps, 12 were at the director level or higher, and Lakers assistant coach Mark Madsen was a mainstay taking notes in the second row.
  • Charles F. Gardner of the Journal Sentinel: Jason Kidd said he and his family have enjoyed the Milwaukee summer and early fall weather while learning the city. "It's going to change; we know that," Kidd said. "But it gets cold on the East Coast, no matter where you are. The beauty of coming here, the people have been wonderful. "You hear about the buzz of the Bucks. When you have new ownership that's going to be aggressive about trying to put a contender together and young talent that's going to take the floor, there's a lot of reason to be excited." The couple has sampled several Milwaukee restaurants already, including Screaming Tuna in Walker's Point and Carnevor in the downtown area. And they have received a sampling of Midwestern hospitality that stunned Porschla. "My neighbors baked us brownies," she said. "That's the first time that's ever happened to me."
  • Chris Fedor of The Plain Dealer: LeBron James and Johnny Manziel were two of the spectators who gathered inside the Capitol Theatre in Cleveland on Thursday night for a private screening of "Survivor's Remorse," a new comedy series from Spring Hill Productions, a company co-owned by James and business partner Maverick Carter. "To be able to do things that we have in our head and to have so many people around us support our ideas, it's a huge stepping stone for us," said James, an Executive Producer for the six-episode series. Set in Atlanta, the show follows a basketball player's rise to stardom after signing a multi-million dollar contract with a professional basketball team.
  • Mike Sielski of The Philadelphia Inquirer: So on Friday, 76ers power forward Nerlens Noel will pretend to be a greasy-fast Eye-talian tank. Kind of. As part of a feature for NBA TV, Noel plans to emulate Sylvester Stallone’s runs through Philadelphia in the first two “Rocky” films. A camera crew will track Noel as he works out at 11 a.m., goes through a shootaround session at noon, and grabs lunch. Starting between 1 and 1:30, Noel will run at the various spots around the city that Stallone used in his movies’ iconic training sequences, including the Italian Market, Independence Hall, and Kelly Drive. Noel’s “run” will culminate around 3 p.m. at the Art Museum, where 100 to 15 middle-school and high school students will join him as he sprints up the steps. Then everyone will have Papa John’s pizza, since Papa John’s is one of the event’s sponsors. Noel’s plan, according to a person close to him, is to use Friday’s event as a springboard for an annual “Nerlens Noel Rocky Run 5K” to raise money for charity.

Ujiri writes column about Ferry comments

September, 11, 2014
Sep 11
7:34
PM ET
By Staff
ESPN.com
Toronto Raptors president and general manager Masai Ujiri has penned a column for the Globe and Mail in regard to the comments made by Atlanta Hawks GM Danny Ferry. Ujiri, from Nigeria, was stung to hear that Ferry had said Luol Deng, of South Sudan, "has a little African in him."
When I first heard it, I wondered, “What does that mean?” I am an African from Nigeria. Luol is an African from South Sudan. We’ve worked together across our home continent, holding our own basketball camps, as well as in those organized by the NBA.

I remember an instance, in Kigali, Rwanda, when Luol honoured a commitment to show up despite being seriously ill. He didn’t want to disappoint any of the children who were expecting him.
Is that “a little bit of African”?

His fellow NBA players have named him the NBA’s top sportsman. Last year, his work for charity earned him the league’s J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship award.

Is that the “African” he means?

Luol has made two all-star teams. A couple of years ago, he had a terrible reaction to a spinal tap. He lost 15 pounds in the hospital. I was texting with him during that ordeal, which was very serious. He always remained humble and full of personality. When he got out, he still tried to play for his team during a playoff series.

Is that “African”?

Ujiri goes on to say explain why he can bring himself to forgive Ferry.

Diaw passes on lessons learned from Spurs

September, 11, 2014
Sep 11
3:23
PM ET
By Mark Woods
Special to ESPN.com
Archive
videoMADRID -- Boris Diaw ran into the locker room just after midnight, his elation unrestrained. France, without Tony Parker, without Joakim Noah, had sent the FIBA Basketball World Cup into a tailspin by knocking off Spain with a quarterfinal performance that defied the law of probabilities.

"We savored it for one minute after the game," the captain of Les Bleus said. “Then it was over, and completely switched off. You have a competition to continue, there’s a World Cup semifinal. That’s something else historic. We’ve always said what our objective is: that’s to go in search of a medal.”

It was Diaw speaking. The words, though, came straight from the mantra of Gregg Popovich. You could almost hear the echoes of the voice of the San Antonio Spurs head coach around the room. No hype. No needless self-congratulation. Not, at least, until the mission has been accomplished.

Next up for the reigning European champions is Serbia in Friday’s second semifinal in Madrid with the chance to fight for gold on Sunday at stake. That would be game No. 102 -- not including exhibitions -- for the 31-year-old in a 12-month spell which has already delivered one title and in which the dream of a second has not yet been extinguished.

If Parker’s absence has been felt, then it is his childhood friend Diaw who has filled the emotional void, soaking up the knowledge acquired with the Spurs over the past two seasons and bringing it back home.

Against Spain, when their old rivals threatened a recovery in the third quarter, he was quick to invoke the San Antonio state of mind.

“Experience makes you grow up and more mature, having that experience from the NBA, winning a European championship last year, makes you know how to win games,” Diaw said.

“I didn’t do anything special during the game. I just told everyone to focus on defense and I said it over and over, so there was no letdown. Because experience has taught me that even a letdown for a few minutes, when you can lose your concentration, when you don’t defend as hard as you can, it can be fatal.

“You can lose a game with taking off three plays in a row. And so the main thing was to keep the intensity of the defense up the whole game.”

Trademark Popovich. But also copyright Diaw, whose commitment to his national team has seen him pull on the blue and white jersey every single offseason since 2000 when he was a teammate of Parker’s at INSEP, the country’s national sporting academy near Paris.

Imagine what Coach K could do with that kind of continuity. Having a player whose commitment is unquestioned and whose voice demands to be heard. That is, France coach Vincent Collet declared, an invaluable presence -- best illustrated by the way his instructions were backed up amid the conquest of Spain.

“Before the game, I explained the way we had to play to have a chance to go win,” Collet said. “He was repeating it several times in the briefing the day before and during the game.

“Every timeout, I was talking and the last 10 seconds, he was taking the players around him and going over the same thing, saying ‘focus’ or ‘we have to do that.' For me that’s so important. We have built a chemistry.”

The players from France, like Spain or Serbia or Lithuania, are simply invested in international play in a way those from the United States have never appeared to be. Some, like Parker, opt out on occasion. But he will -- barring injury -- be back in blue for next year’s European championships and the 2016 Olympics.

“I was talking about it with LaMarcus [Aldridge] and Damian [Lillard] because we were sure they would be representing the USA,” said Portland Trail Blazers forward Nicolas Batum. “But it is now 10 years for me this summer. I started playing on the national team when I was 15 years old.

“Every summer since then, I’ve been on the team. Those memories, it’s a great thing to represent your country. And when you win, it’s a great feeling. You feel proud. To make my country proud is a great feeling.”

They would be elated further if they defeat Serbia. It will not be simple.

Bogdan Bogdanovic and Nemanja Bjelica, whose NBA rights are held respectively by the Phoenix Suns and Minnesota Timberwolves, have been stellar since France knocked off the Serbs 74-73 in preliminary-round play in Granada, courtesy of a last-second free throw from young center Joffrey Lauvergne, whose maturation here will likely enthuse the Denver Nuggets, who hold his NBA rights.

Collet will challenge his players to defend for their lives and to rise up again. “It’s my main concern, to make everybody understand, especially the young guys, that to do it one time doesn’t mean you’ll do it every time," he said. "We did it because we took the good pass. The main thing for us is to remain consistent, to remain serious and not dream.”

It is, you can be sure, a message that will be drilled home repeatedly by the first among France’s equals.

“It’s never done, until it’s done,” Diaw said with a smile. “You can have confidence in your team, the confidence that you can go as far as possible.

“We’ve got two chances to win a medal but we want to try to win one through the next game.”

Pop, somewhere, will be nodding in approval.

Krstic giving all for Serb cause


Nenad Krstic will push himself to the limit to give Serbia the assist it needs to get past France, but the former NBA center hopes his contribution can be measured in more than numbers.

The 31-year-old, whose Stateside trip took in stops with the Boston Celtics, Oklahoma City Thunder and the New Jersey Nets, is battling past a chronic thigh injury which has left one leg weaker than the other and which kept him out of the previous meeting with France here in Spain.

“My knee was not stable,” he told ESPN.com. “I’m getting better but I’m not in much shape. I’m playing through pain sometimes. I have good days and bad days.”

As team captain, Krstic has seen Serbia restore some of the luster it shared as part of the former Yugoslavia, with fourth place at the 2010 FIBA world championships in Turkey, in addition to a second place at the 2009 EuroBasket.

With a mix of veterans and youth, this might be their time. “We had some ups and downs,” he said. “In 2011, we were close to the [EuroBasket] semifinal. Last year we were close to the semifinals. Hopefully we can make that next step.

“I’m trying to help my team. Not just on the court but off the court, talking in the hotel, talking in the locker room, trying to be a positive guy and a leader and a good captain.”

NBA schedule leaves suspense out of sport

September, 11, 2014
Sep 11
1:44
PM ET
Strauss By Ethan Sherwood Strauss
ESPN.com
Archive
video

Tom Haberstroh writes about how lack of rest for players harms the NBA product. I suggest you read that, given that it’s good. Of particular interest (to me, possibly to you) is Tom’s section on research done by the ever-sharp Neil Paine:

"Briliant research by 538’s Neil Paine found that we learn as much about the true abilities of an NBA team after 22 games as we do about an MLB team after they play their full 162-game slate. Let that marinate for a second. Twenty-two games. That’s all it takes.”


Tom goes on to remind us of where teams ended up after Christmas Day, an unofficial marker of when the NBA season really gets going.

“Go ahead and pull up the NBA’s standings on Christmas Day last season. There you’ll find the six division leaders were Toronto, Indiana, Miami, Oklahoma City, Los Angeles Clippers and San Antonio. Yes, the exact same ones at the regular-season’s end.”


The NBA season ends before it really begins, apparently. I hate telling you this because hey, I’d prefer you pay attention to whatever I’m babbling about after December. Unfortunately you have license to tune out my, and any other, basketball commentary when we change the calendar. You don’t even need to necessarily watch the games, either. Sure you’d miss a lot of highlight plays, but you’d be about as informed as regular viewers regarding which teams are the best in their conferences.

The games are fun to watch, but they lack the urgency that comes with a loss actually derailing a season and mattering in a broader context. These fun-to-watch games would be even more fun to watch if they carried such suspense.

Moreover, the NBA season is just plain l-o-n-g. If variety is the spice of life, scarcity is the spice of sports. And basketball isn’t scarce at all. There’s a steady stream of televised games, nearly every night, for six months.

What’s funny is that Nike, the apparel company making the most money off basketball, totally gets how important scarcity is. For years it has been artificially producing fewer specialty shoes than demand calls for.

Maybe you like having 82 games. I understand that, as someone who can feel lost without the comforting metronome of a basketball thudding through my TV speakers. I don’t think we’re normal for that inclination, though, and the NBA’s probably turning off a whole bunch of casual sports fans who would be drawn in if regular-season games were big events. Imagine the ratings if the NBA adopted the Arnovitz plan of a 44-game season, with games landing only on Tuesdays, Thursdays and an added nationally televised showcase game on the weekends. All-time records would be impacted by a shortened season, but Michael Jordan managed to convince people of his pre-eminence without ever catching Kareem in scoring.

Here’s where you say, “What about the lost revenue in cutting all those games?” I hear that, but the NFL makes more TV money off its 16-game season than the NBA makes off 82 games.

The NBA might not want the NFL’s current headlines, but it certainly wants its success. It’s no coincidence that the league is installing NFL-like replay review and bowing before the altar of parity. What the NBA isn’t willing to do, though, is take that which actually fuels its bigger brother’s success. It’s not willing to cut back on an overlong season in the interest of driving interest.

As a once-huge NFL fan, I remember going to a preseason Chargers-Seahawks game and getting struck by how boring it was when deprived of stakes. There’s a lot of dead time in football, dull moments that are pregnant with tension when the result matters. Divorced from suspense, from coaches clinging to their jobs, from star quarterbacks facing down the heat of media scrutiny, from the entire season hanging on a single play, the action on the field isn’t intrinsically all that interesting. You can watch some guys play basketball in the park and be reasonably entertained. That’s partially why the league can trudge along with its overlong season and get by. Football needs stakes. I would argue that much if not most of football’s entertainment factor lies in the sense that one sudden play can mean a lot.

The NBA’s regular season lacks that, and frankly, so do the first couple rounds of the Eastern Conference playoffs. Basketball starts in the fall and has no stakes until it gets to the spring. NBA owners are making money, as nearly all major sports are in the DVR era, so perhaps the status quo satisfies the powers that be. But this wonderful sport is likely a lot less popular than it could be, given that its season is roughly four times longer than it needs to be. If NBA owners were a bit more bold, they’d discover that less is more.

TrueHoop TV Live

September, 11, 2014
Sep 11
1:36
PM ET
Strauss By Ethan Sherwood Strauss
ESPN.com
Archive
Join the chatter at 2 p.m. ET.

First Cup: Thursday

September, 11, 2014
Sep 11
5:10
AM ET
By Nick Borges
ESPN.com
Archive
  • Jamie Samuelsen for the Detroit Free Press: We all have our causes in sports, ones that we believe in more strongly than we should. Ones that we believe in even though the odds are stacked against us. Some causes are noble. Some are just plain stupid. Honestly, this one probably tends far more towards stupid than it does noble, but it doesn’t make me believe it any less – I think the Pistons should retire the No. 1 for Chauncey Billups. ... Of all the things to argue about in sports, jersey retirements are some of the most unimportant and yet the most thought provoking. There are plenty of limitations on the Billups argument, the largest of which is that he played more seasons of his NBA career in a uniform other than the Detroit Pistons. But in my mind, retired numbers should honor the most important players in the history of a franchise. And you can’t tell me that there has been a more important player to wear a Pistons uniform this century. That should be good enough.
  • Brian Lewis of the New York Post: Nets coach Lionel Hollins has heard all the dire predictions for his team, but doesn’t care. He said Brook Lopez is recovering well and is expected to be ready for the start of the season, and he also said he plans to put the ball in Deron Williams’ hands and let the All-Star point guard do what he does best. “He’s a point guard," Hollins said. “He’s our point guard. Will we play Jarrett Jack and Deron together? I’m sure we will. But that doesn’t mean Deron has to be off the ball. When you have two guys who can handle the ball, it doesn’t matter who handles it, but he’s going to be the primary ballhandler." Williams, 30, played off the ball frequently last year with the emergence of Shaun Livingston, but this season Hollins said Williams will be the primary playmaker. Either way, Williams has to be better than his last two seasons, when — beset by ankle woes — he shot 44.4 percent and wasn’t his old attacking self. Hollins also said he was happy with Lopez’s offseason progress.
  • Jeff Schultz of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution: What Adam Silver did not reference, however, is that one of the Hawks’ primary owners, Michael Gearon Jr., wants Ferry fired, but exiting owner Bruce Levenson and CEO Steve Koonin do not. The Hawks’ ownership and front office has morphed into a typical fight between six-year-olds in the sandbox. This has been one of the ugliest chapters in Hawks’ franchise history, possibly even worse than when Gearon and Levenson went to court against then-partner Steve Belkin, who attempted to block the Joe Johnson trade with Phoenix in 2005. But that is about the only thing Gearon and Levenson have been united on. ... Silver impressed many with the way he responded to the Donald Sterling situation, shortly after taking over as commissioner. The danger for Silver in this situation is new layers are being added to the story daily, from revelations of Levenson’s race-infused email in 2012 and his exit, to the Ferry story to the daily mudslinging and story-leaking from the two sides: Gearon and his father on one side and Levenson, Ferry and Koonin on the other. I’ve made my view clear: Whether or Silver believes what Ferry said is not a fireable offense, I believe he and the organization are so tainted by the past few days that the team needs new ownership and a new general manager to truly move forward.
  • Jeff Miller of The Orange County Register: New coach Byron Scott says he will supply his players with quotes – quick thoughts meant to inspire – the messages left in their lockers and on their cellphones and tucked away any place where the words can then leap out and make an impact. And what quote would he present to the team’s fans, fans who are about to watch the Lakers be led by a fifth different head coach since winning their most recent title? “Be patient,” Scott says, and the fact everyone in the room – Scott is addressing a gathering of Register subscribers – breaks up confirms the folly in suggesting Lakers rooters can be anything but anxious for the team’s inevitable return to greatness. Now, imagine the challenge Scott faces in trying to convince the most Laker of them all to be patient. He’d probably have an easier time benching Kobe Bryant, right? Well, Scott says benching Bryant just might happen at times this season, too. “There are going to be points where he’s probably not going to be happy with the decisions,” Scott says. “But that’s my job as coach, to stick to those plans.”
  • A. Sherrod Blakely of CSNNE.com: Danny Ainge isn't all that different than most GMs when it comes to wanting to have lots of options in pulling off deals. That's why today is significant for the Celtics' president of basketball operations in his quest to get Boston's roster in order. Tyler Zeller and Marcus Thornton, both acquired via trade on July 10, are now eligible to be included in trades in which they can be paired with other Celtics players. ... The NBA's Collective Bargaining Agreement does not allow teams to trade players acquired via exceptions for at least two months following the deal's completion. However, Zeller is not expected to be on the trading block anytime soon. In fact, he will be the hunt to start at center this season. Zeller's agent Sam Goldfeder said his client should also benefit from having a familiarity with Celtics head coach Brad Stevens who recruited both of his brothers. As for Thornton, he's more likely to be moved at some point prior to the February trade deadline in part because of the team's logjam in the backcourt.
  • Michael Kaskey-Blomain of The Philadelphia Inquirer: At 33, Jason Richardson’s is the team’s elder statesman. New addition Luc Mbah a Moute is the Sixers’ second-most-experienced player at 27 years old. After him, everyone else is 26 or younger, with most of the key cogs barely above the legal drinking age. With so many young, impressionable players on the team, the lack of on-court experience and locker room leadership could be an issue. It is something that general manager Sam Hinkie has considered. ... Hinkie seems to be well aware of the import of having some experienced players around to show the younger guys the ropes and to help them develop. From where he sits, the two players the Sixers received in return for Thaddeus Young - Moute and Alexey Shved - will help fill the veteran void left by the Young trade.
  • Dan McCarney of the San Antonio Express-News: The makers of the popular NBA 2K video game series have been releasing individual player ratings in the lead-up to the release of their latest edition on Oct. 7. In doing so they teased that four players have been pegged in the 90s. Two are pretty easy to guess. Indeed, Royce Young of Daily Thunder was tipped off that reigning MVP Kevin Durant earned an overall 95. LeBron James will obviously be one of the four as well. So who will be the remaining two? Kevin Love? Chris Paul? Blake Griffin? Anthony Davis? Stephen Curry? All legitimate candidates. And they’ll be battling among themselves after a leaked photo showed that none other than Tim Duncan, creaky knees, graying beard and all, was awarded a 90. It’s a generous rating to be sure, given that Duncan was rated at 87 in last year’s game on the heels of becoming the oldest player since Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980s to earn first-team All-NBA honors. Duncan wasn’t quite as good in 2013-14, averaging 2.7 points, 0.2 rebounds and 0.8 blocks fewer per game in roughly one minute less per game. But make no mistake — even at 38, he remains a quality player on both ends of the court, and a key to the Spurs’ hope of defending their title in what just might be his last NBA season.
  • Des Bieler of The Washington Post: Adidas is set to release a John Wall signature shoe line in October. Wall becomes just the second NBA star to get one with the company, following Derrick Rose. The “J Wall 13 actually made its debut during the Wizard’s stint over the summer with Team USA. Those shoes, seen to the left, amounted to a preview of things to come. They blended in well with the Team USA uniform, and had Wall’s new logo, but looked fairly plain, otherwise. ... If you feel like you’ve seen these shoes already, it’s because photos of them have been floating around at least since May. Here’s hoping the shoes are a success, both for Wall’s sake and for that of Adidas, which is losing traction in this country.
  • Bernie Augustine of the New York Daily News: The Jeremy Lin offseason comedy tour rolled into San Francisco last month, with the new Lakers point guard scaring some visitors to Madame Tussauds’ location near the city’s Embarcardero. The famous wax museum unveiled a Lin statue on Aug. 14, and the former Knicks sensation was there, too, sitting motionless and duping visitors into thinking that he was the wax mannequin. The results — as expected — are funny (who doesn’t like to watch videos of people being scared out of their skin?). Lin even ran back one of the pranks he pulled on his mom earlier this summer, dunking on a pair of unsuspecting ladies who were posing with the actual Lin statue.
  • Darnell Mayberry of The Oklahoman: The Oklahoma City Thunder might soon have a new nickname for its NBA Development League franchise. After relocating the team from Tulsa, it appears the Thunder is on the verge of rebranding the franchise the Oklahoma City Blue. The league has filed a trademark application with the United States Patent and Trademark Office for the team name, requesting rights to the brand on numerous clothing, merchandise and apparel from everything to jerseys and T-shirts to cheerleading dresses and bathing caps. The trademark application was filed August 25. There was not a logo associated with the application. A Thunder spokesman confirmed the filing but said nothing has been finalized.
  • Dawn Gilbertson of The Arizona Republic: Might Southwest Airlines be interested in splashing its bold new look on a certain downtown Phoenix arena about to lose its longtime airline sponsor? Kevin Krone, the airline's chief marketing officer, didn't rule out the possibility of exploring a deal to replace US Airways as the name sponsor of the US Airways Center but noted that naming rights deals are generally too pricey for cost-conscious Southwest. "We always look at local markets and think about opportunities like that," Krone said during an interview about Southwest's makeover this week. "A lot of times they're expensive and things that we can't afford because at the end of the day we want to make sure we are able to profitably offer low fares." US Airways' contract, which expires next year and won't be renewed by the airline and merger partner American Airlines, was a 10-year deal for more than $20 million but officials have said they expect to attract more money in the new naming rights deal.

The Atlanta Dilemma

September, 10, 2014
Sep 10
4:04
PM ET
Strauss By Ethan Sherwood Strauss
ESPN.com
Archive
Bomani Jones stops by to unpack this Atlanta Hawks scandal and what it means in the broader NBA picture.

video

Weary NBA players need more rest

September, 10, 2014
Sep 10
1:26
PM ET
Strauss By Ethan Sherwood Strauss
ESPN.com
Archive
All-Star Weekend is now a week, but the length of the season remains the same. Tom Haberstroh on why that may be problematic for players throughout the season.

video

First Cup: Wednesday

September, 10, 2014
Sep 10
5:07
AM ET
By Nick Borges
ESPN.com
Archive
  • Harvey Araton of The New York Times: It was 10 years ago that Larry Bird weighed in with an opinion that these days might have hastened his departure from the racial tinderbox known as the N.B.A. Bird, the most celebrated white player in the history of the sport, told an interviewer that the league, perceived to be shedding fans rapidly in the post-Michael Jordan era, could use a few more stars as pale-faced as him. “It’s good for a fan base because, as we all know, the majority of the fans are white America,” said Bird, who was then, and still is, an executive with the Indiana Pacers. “And if you just had a couple of white guys in there, you might get them a little excited.” Lost on Bird — and more recently on the Atlanta Hawks’ controlling owner, Bruce Levenson — was the possibility of more inclusive crowds, or even a country where income distribution might be equitable enough to allow attendance to more accurately reflect the demographics of a market. What helped Bird navigate the potential minefield was that he, after all, was Larry Bird and that Magic Johnson, his best bud and 1980s co-star, agreed (“We need some more L.B.s”). But the subject of race might have been a less frightening proposition in 2004 than in 2014, when nuance has become anathema in America, and way beyond the business of sports.
  • Justin Terranova of the New York Post: Carmelo Anthony didn’t follow LeBron James’ lead in free agency — it was the opposite. Even though James announced his return to Cleveland before Anthony opted to re-sign with the Knicks, Anthony thinks he played a role in James’ decision. Anthony, who was raised in Brooklyn, noted the way the crowd embraced after he forced a trade from the Nuggets to the Knicks in 2011. “No. Honestly, I think it was the other way around,” Anthony told Giants great Michael Strahan in an interview for Adweek when asked if James’ decision affected him. I think he saw when I came back home to New York and saw the response and saw the reaction and saw how at peace I was when I came back home. … I’m pretty sure he looked at that moment and saw that that was a very special moment, and he had the opportunity to go back home himself and regain that love.”
  • Christopher Dempsey of The Denver Post: Coloradans have watched Chauncey Billups grow, watched him become a hometown legend and watched him never turn his back on the city that raised him. The state's fans' love affair with him won't die, because he's eternally in love with Colorado. From multiple state titles won at George Washington High School to a one-half scare of powerhouse North Carolina in the second round of the 1997 NCAA Tournament, Billups has always been Colorado's. And Coloradans loved watching him work. He wants to be an executive now; why not do that in Denver? So many people ask just that. Billups once was asked if he was a Hall of Fame player. "The way that my career has gone, you could really only start to think about that the second half of my career," he said. "The first part of my career was so up and down, not really finding my niche. So obviously if my whole career had gone like this, I would say, yeah. But it's tough to say." And maybe some of that has faded. But the memories of what he has done on and off the court never will. Chauncey Billups. Mr. Big Shot. King of Park Hill. NBA Finals MVP and NBA champion. Seven-time all-star. Coloradan. Winner. Leader. And now? A well-deserved rest.
  • Chris Paul via Instagram: Welllll, let me start by saying that I usually don't get too emotional when it comes to former opponents or even teammates, but this one is a lil different! I was blessed and fortunate to be born with an amazing big brother who everyone knows already. But early in my career when I began to have what they call "NBA family", I was blessed with another big brother! In a league that's filled with fierce competition and unfortunately at times jealousy, a veteran guard took me under his wing and told me and showed me what it means to be a professional and to ALWAYS help the next guy coming up behind you. One of the highlights of my career was the night that I found out I would get to play along side of Chaunce! I could go on and on talkin about this guy but I'll end by saying THANK YOU BIG SHOT!!! And I would love to be there whenever the Hall of Fame Ceremony is! #MrBigShot #1 #ParkHill #Bbbbbbillups #MuchLove
  • K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune: Yes, Tom Thibodeau has left USA Basketball's hotel, dining one night near the Mediterranean Sea with other team personnel. So, no, he isn't pulling the curtains on his room shut tight, poring over film of Tuesday's quarterfinal opponent Slovenia. He's not even — skipping steps here, a Thibodeau no-no — scouting Spain, which Team USA could face Sept. 14 in a spectacular FIBA World Cup final. Since traveling abroad, Thibodeau hasn't even made contact with Spanish star and Bulls free-agent prize Pau Gasol, given their respective national team commitments and all. But when Thibodeau has caught Spain, which now is playing its side of the draw in Madrid, Gasol's play has demanded attention. "Pau is playing very, very well in all areas," Thibodeau said. "His defense, his rebounding, his passing, his scoring — all those things have been very, very good. I love the way he is moving. He looks like he's completely healthy. He's rejuvenated."
  • Barry Jackson of The Miami Herald: No surprise here: Michael Beasley definitely won't be back with the Heat, agent Jared Kearns said Tuesday. The Heat never made an offer, preferring instead to sign journeyman Shawne Williams, whose career hasn't been nearly as productive as Beasley's. The Lakers twice have watched Beasley work out, and they remain a possibility for him. The Heat's decision not to retain Beasley --- in spite of his offensive gifts --- ultimately came down to the coaching staff's lack of complete trust in him. Defense and maturity issues were cited by one NBA official briefed on the Heat's decision, though Beasley behaved more maturely last season than in his earlier stint with the Heat.
  • Scott Agness of VigilantSports.com: Paul George can’t get work in on the basketball court for at least a couple months, but that doesn’t mean he’s not working everyday to improve. In addition to caring to his right leg, for which he had surgery on Aug. 2 to repair an open tibia-fibula fracture, George has been in the weight room and is now trying a new training tactic. Donald Sloan, one of the Pacers’ trio of point guards, hooked him up with a product he uses, POWERHANDZ, which “are performance enhancing athletic training products innovatively designed to both strengthen hand and arm muscles and intensify players’ dexterity,” according to their official site. There are weights on the outside of the gloves. The palms are slippery and as one starts to dribble, there’s resistance. Through all of that, a player can strengthen muscles and improve their ball handling. ... George in a post on Instagram: “I’m working when I can’t work over here!!!!”
  • Bob Ryan of The Boston Globe: Basketball always came easy to Marvin Barnes. Once he stepped outside the gym, it was a different matter. He struggled with life,” says Mike Tranghese. “He really did.” The colossal struggle, which included a reported 19 separate drug rehabs and a documented four prison terms, ended Monday. He was 62. ... No one ever really understood why Marvin couldn’t figure, you know, “it” out, why he would squander that Hall of Fame talent. Imagine what it must have been like to be him. He knew what he had done to his life, but he just couldn’t help himself. He was Marvin “Sad News” Barnes.
  • A. Sherrod Blakely of CSNNE.com: When you start to break down this Boston Celtics roster, it's filled with men of mystery. Tyler Zeller? Marcus Thornton? Even the ones we do know, like Rajon Rondo and Jeff Green, bring a certain element of dubiety to the game. But few Celtics are as big a wild-card this season, as rookie James Young. "Potential" is the spoken word of choice by most in describing the 6-foot-6 wing. But his length and athleticism might put him in line to be talked about when it comes to playing time this season. Young has been among the contingent of Celtics players in town recently. "He's been working hard," Celtics assistant coach Walter McCarty said of Young. "We're exited about where he's at."
  • J. Michael of CSN Washington: The last of the Wizards' three offseason acquisitions to be brought on board, DeJuan Blair is the first one to arrive and begin individual work at Verizon Center, CSNwashington.com has confirmed. Paul Pierce and Kris Humphries have been working out on their own before reporting to D.C. for the 2014-15 season. Bradley Beal, Garrett Temple, John Wall, Marcin Gortat, Glen Rice and Otto Porter have been in town as recently as last week. Kevin Seraphin was here before that to train. Even Martell Webster, who is recovering from back surgery in late June and can't partake in basketball activities for as many as five months, has done conditioning for the last two days. Veterans Drew Gooden and Andre Miller haven't shown up yet. Players aren't required to report until training camp begins Sept. 30. It's customary around the league that after Labor Day weekend that they'll begin to trickle into town to prepare.

SPONSORED HEADLINES