TrueHoop: Flop of the Night

Flop of the night: John Henson

January, 16, 2013
1/16/13
3:13
PM ET
Mason By Beckley Mason
ESPN.com
Archive
NAME OF PLAYER
Gary Dineen/Getty Images
Henson doesn't yet have the heft to deal with Dwight Howard inside.

At 6-11 and just 220 pounds, John Henson may not be cut out to bang with all 265 muscular pounds of Dwight Howard in the paint. On Tuesday night the same could be said for the rest of the Bucks big men, too, as Howard scored all 14 of his buckets within seven feet of the rim.

Henson certainly couldn't handle Howard's power, so he evidently came up with another plan: Flop!

Watch for the last angle on this video as Henson hits the deck when Howard rumbles to the basket -- his head whips back his arms flail, but Henson actually braces against Howard with both hands before propelling himself backward.

This flop would appear to meet the league's requirements for a gross exaggeration of contact intended to fool an official, so Henson may soon be hearing from the NBA league office.

If he does, it will be the first such warning issued in more than two weeks -- since December 29th, when the league issued warnings to Gustavo Ayon, Tony Parker and Royal Ivey.

Has the league gone soft on floppers in 2013? Could be. But that lull is surely also at least in part because the rule is making a difference. Last year, it was a cinch to spot egregious flops nightly. This year, to the naked eye anyway, they're much harder to find.

Flop of the night: Chauncey Billups

December, 4, 2012
12/04/12
2:16
PM ET
Mason By Beckley Mason
ESPN.com
Archive
Chauncey Billups
Garrett W. Ellwood/NBAE/Getty ImagesChauncey Billups deployed veteran trickery to great effect Monday night.
Chauncey Billups is a high risk to receive a flopping warning from the NBA league office after his egregious "roughing the punter" flop -- the very same flop that played a critical role in the Clippers beating the Jazz Monday night.

Utah, which lost by a single point, would probably prefer the win to the flopping warning, but you get what you can get in this league.

The Billups flop (Video) came with only 75 seconds left to play in the game, with the Jazz clinging to a two-point lead. After Chris Paul almost lost possession and had to save the ball to Blake Griffin, the Clippers offense was in total disarray. Billups found himself with the ball during a possession that seemed to be going Utah's way. As Billups elevated to shoot, Mo Williams flew out to contest the shot, while taking special care to avoid the shooting Billups.

Billups, however, needed points any way he could get them, and therefore -- the video shows -- kicked his leg out and tumbled to the ground as though Williams had run right through him. Referee Dick Bavetta, whose view of Williams was obscured by Billups, awarded the Clipper guard three critical free throws. Billups hit two, tying the game.

Many plays contributed to the Jazz loss, but it's hard not to feel Bavetta's call had outsized impact, even though it was a call that anyone watching on TV could clearly see was a mistake. The replay was aired before a single free throw had been attempted. Hundreds of thousands of TV viewers could have correctly reversed the call on the spot. But thanks to NBA rules, the game's officials had no access to that replay in real time, and so Billups got his free throws.

When you see an egregious flop that deserves proper recognition, send us a link to the video so we can consider it for Flop of the Night. Here's how to make your submission:
  • Alert HoopIdea to super flops with the Twitter hashtag #FlopOfTheNight (follow us on Twitter here).
  • Use the #FlopOfTheNight hashtag in Daily Dime Live.
  • E-mail us at hoopidea@gmail.com

Flop of the Night: J.J. Barea

November, 28, 2012
11/28/12
12:43
PM ET
Mason By Beckley Mason
ESPN.com
Archive
J.J. Barea
David Sherman/NBAE/Getty Images
J.J. Barea kept flopping against the Kings until it paid off.

Three weeks after receiving a warning from the NBA for flopping, J.J. Barea earned #FlopOfTheNight honors (Video) for his acting work against the Isaiah Thomas of Sacramento Kings. The battle of diminutive point guard turned heated in the fourth quarter when Thomas yelled at Barea to stop flopping after Barea flew backwards as Thomas elevated for a pull up jump shot.

The officials didn't bite, and the Timberwolves guard actually walked over to the refs during a timeout to plead his case. Thomas followed close behind, eager to hear what Barea had to say.

Just a couple minutes later, Thomas again drove towards the rim and this time, when Barea bucked backwards as though Thomas had given him a brutal stiff arm, the officials gave Barea the call.

The play looked awfully similar to the flop that earned Barea his warning back on November 6th, which also featured a driving player (Jimmer Fredette) using his forearm to ward off Barea.

Generously listed at six feet tall, when Barea plays defense it's natural for contact that would land in the mid section of a taller player to hit Barea around the shoulders, thus producing the kind of impact that often draws an offensive foul call. However Thomas is listed at 5-9 and his forearm appears to land below Barea's ribs.

If the NBA deems this instance a violation of the its anti-flopping rules, Barea will be the second player this year to be fined $5,000, after Reggie Evans of the Brooklyn Nets.

When you see an egregious flop that deserves proper recognition, send us a link to the video so we can consider it for Flop of the Night. Here's how to make your submission:
  • Alert HoopIdea to super flops with the Twitter hashtag #FlopOfTheNight (follow us on Twitter here).
  • Use the #FlopOfTheNight hashtag in Daily Dime Live.
  • E-mail us at hoopidea@gmail.com

Flop of the Night: Gerald Wallace

November, 27, 2012
11/27/12
1:13
PM ET
Mason By Beckley Mason
ESPN.com
Archive
Gerald Wallace
Bruce Bennett/NBAE/Getty Images
Gerald Wallace plays, and sometimes acts, with gusto.

When Reggie Evans received the NBA’s first ever flopping fine and cemented his reputation as the league’s most notorious actor, not everyone was pleased. Although he was the victim of Evans' fine-worthy flop, Metta World Peace said Evans’ Brooklyn teammate, Gerald Wallace, was the real flopper.

"That's ridiculous," World Peace said in response to the Evans' punishment, according to a report from ESPN NY’s Mike Mazzeo. "I'd rather Gerald Wallace get fined than Evans."

Well, World Peace may have to settle for a warning after this Flop of the Night (Video) from Wallace during the second half of Brooklyn’s win over the Knicks Monday night.

It’s a classic “exploding pick” flop: Wallace runs right into Chandler, who is pivoting to face the basket with the ball in his hands. The contact is minimal, but that doesn't stop Wallace from violently throwing his head back after crashing into the all-but-stationary Knicks big man. The play erased a wide open Carmelo Anthony jumper in a tight game that ended up going to overtime.

It will be up to the NBA to decide whether Wallace’s flop merits a warning for “overembellishing” the contact -- remember Wallace snapped his head back despite running into Chandler’s hip.

When you see an egregious flop that deserves proper recognition, send us a link to the video so we can consider it for Flop of the Night. Here's how to make your submission:
  • Alert HoopIdea to super flops with the Twitter hashtag #FlopOfTheNight (follow us on Twitter here).
  • Use the #FlopOfTheNight hashtag in Daily Dime Live.
  • E-mail us at hoopidea@gmail.com

Flop of the Night: James Harden

June, 7, 2012
6/07/12
12:36
PM ET
Mason By Beckley Mason
ESPN.com
Archive
Mickael Pietrus
Layne Murdoch/NBAE/Getty Images
James Harden had two big flops in Game 6.

HoopIdea wants to #StopTheFlop. To spotlight the biggest fakers, we present Flop of the Night. You can help us separate the pretenders from the defenders -- details below:

It was supposed to be the Spurs who had the veteran wiles to carry them through the playoffs. But the Thunder beat them at their own game with exquisite shot-making, tight defense and ... some well-timed flops.

None were bigger than when James Harden stepped in to take a dubious offensive foul from Manu Ginobili (video) as Ginobili passed out to Kawhi Leonard, who drilled the open 3-pointer. The “pass and crash,” when a driving player dishes the ball then makes contact with a secondary defender who slides in for a “charge,” is a pet peeve of HoopIdea and, to hear Twitter tell it, quite a few NBA fans as well.

It’s conceivable that Bill Kennedy, the official on the baseline, saw the play as a moving screen on Ginobili. But watch the replay, and you’ll see Harden is selling the foul before he even runs into Ginobili, who is arguably trying to get out of Harden’s way.

Leonard’s 3 would have made it a one-point game. Instead, the Thunder got the ball and the lead.

It was a fitting way to seal the series. In Game 1, when the Spurs looked poised to roll through the playoffs to a fifth championship, Ginobili earned a trip to the line by winning a flop-off with his Thunder counterpart. But Harden and the Thunder learned quickly and ultimately earned a trip to the NBA Finals.

BONUS FLOP: This wasn’t Harden’s only trickery in Game 6. Late in the third quarter, he also drew a foul (and ended a Spurs possession) by whipping his head back as though Stephen Jackson had punched him in the chin. Thing is, Jackson was just standing there minding his own business -- the foul was complete fabrication (Video).

When you see an egregious flop that deserves proper recognition, send us a link to the video so we can consider it for Flop of the Night. Here's how to make your submission:
  • Alert HoopIdea to super flops with the Twitter hashtag #FlopOfTheNight (follow us on Twitter here).
  • Use the #FlopOfTheNight hashtag in Daily Dime Live.
  • E-mail us at hoopidea@gmail.com

Flop of the Night: Mickael Pietrus

June, 6, 2012
6/06/12
12:38
PM ET
By Beckley Mason and Zach Harper
ESPN.com
Mickael PietrusDavid Dow/NBAE/Getty Images
Mickael Pietrus performed the most consequential flop of the season.

HoopIdea wants to #StopTheFlop. To spotlight the biggest fakers, we present Flop of the Night. You can help us separate the pretenders from the defenders -- details below:

This one might be the Flop of the Year.

There were 155 seconds left in Game 5 of the Eastern Conference finals as Kevin Garnett let fly with a baseline jumper. As the ball swished through the net, Mickael Pietrus sprinted in from the opposite wing, looking for a potential offensive rebound. Instead, he ran straight into a boxout from Mario Chalmers, who put up his forearms, but did not extend his arms, to ward off the much bigger Pietrus.

On contact that he receives and doles out dozens of times each game, Pietrus’ body went rigid and he flopped over onto his back (video), right in front of Derrick Stafford, who rewarded the act with a technical foul.

It wasn’t much of a collision to begin with, but a run-of-the-mill foul would have been nearly inconsequential as the Heat were nowhere near the penalty. But the technical sent Ray Allen to the free throw line, where he calmly drilled the freebie.

One undeserved point.

It doesn’t sound like much, but in the context of the final moments of Game 5 in the Eastern Conference finals, it matters.

To Jeff Van Gundy, who was calling the game for ESPN along with Mike Breen, it mattered quite a bit:
Van Gundy: It just drives me crazy we're in the playoffs, Game 5, tied ... and Ray Allen goes to get an extra point!

Mike Breen: And the technical on Chalmers. You know we talked about how in a game like this, one point can be the difference.

Then, tongue planted firmly in cheek, Van Gundy offered a deterrent to flopping:

"Pietrus tricked the referee and should be fined $1 million tomorrow for it!"

Van Gundy may have strayed into hyperbole, but he wasn't kidding about the magnitude of the play.

Pietrus and Chalmers both hit huge 3-pointers on the following possessions, and then Paul Pierce drilled a contested 3 right over LeBron James to give the Celtics a two-possession lead they would never relinquish.

Of course, without that free point from the Chalmers technical, it would have been a one-possession game. That isn’t to say things would have turned out any differently -- the Celtics had a decided advantage either way.

But it’s a shame that a flop had any bearing on the final moments of an otherwise fantastic game.

When you see an egregious flop that deserves proper recognition, send us a link to the video so we can consider it for Flop of the Night. Here's how to make your submission:
  • Alert HoopIdea to super flops with the Twitter hashtag #FlopOfTheNight (follow us on Twitter here).
  • Use the #FlopOfTheNight hashtag in Daily Dime Live.
  • E-mail us at hoopidea@gmail.com

Flop of the Night: Shane Battier

June, 4, 2012
6/04/12
1:35
PM ET
Mason By Beckley Mason
ESPN.com
Archive
Shane Battier
Jim Davis/Getty Images
Shane Battier fought and flopped for every inch against Paul Pierce in Game 4.

HoopIdea wants to #StopTheFlop. To spotlight the biggest fakers, we present Flop of the Night. You can help us separate the pretenders from the defenders -- details below:

There were questionable calls aplenty in Game 4 of the Eastern Conference finals, but this first quarter flop from Shane Battier (video) is special because it was Paul Pierce’s first foul (he would later foul out of the game) and because Battier’s flailing rescued a doomed possession for the Heat.

With the shot clock running down, Battier ranked ahead of only Joel Anthony in terms of players the Heat wanted creating a shot. But that's exactly what happened after the Celtics thwarted Miami's plan to feed Wade in the post.

It was a dream scenario for Boston: Battier trying to create off the dribble against Pierce, one of the Celtics' very best defenders.

Instead of actually trying to make a shot, though, Battier took off for the paint with dreams of free throws dancing in his head. At the first hint of contact -- and driving to the rim in the NBA, there's always contact -- Battier flails his arms, dives to the side and crashes to the ground.

Battier's ludicrous reaction exposes his true intent, which has nothing to do with actual basketball, and it worked. The referee’s whistle bailed out the Heat.

BONUS FLOP: Mario Chalmers didn’t get the call, but the audacity of this flop (video) deserves recognition. Note the incredible distance he travels on his back! And then note Jeff Van Gundy's disdain.

When you see an egregious flop that deserves proper recognition, send us a link to the video so we can consider it for Flop of the Night. Here's how to make your submission:
  • Alert HoopIdea to super flops with the Twitter hashtag #FlopOfTheNight (follow us on Twitter here).
  • Use the #FlopOfTheNight hashtag in Daily Dime Live.
  • E-mail us at hoopidea@gmail.com

Flop of the Night: Boris Diaw

May, 30, 2012
5/30/12
1:19
PM ET
By Beckley Mason and Zach Harper
ESPN.com
Boris Diaw
Ronald Martinez/NBAE/Getty Images
Boris Diaw is not too big to flop.

HoopIdea wants to #StopTheFlop. To spotlight the biggest fakers, we present Flop of the Night. You can help us separate the pretenders from the defenders -- details below:

Much has been made about Boris Diaw's questionable fitness. He may be listed at 245 pounds, but the old eye test tells a far heftier story, despite his excellent agility.

Whatever the actual number, we can agree that Diaw is quite large enough to handle a bump from 190-pound Russell Westbrook. We know this because Diaw spent Game 2 setting dozens of very effective screens on Westbrook, handling the contact steadily almost every time.

But on this play (video), Diaw is bowled over the contact he himself creates by shuffling into position to pick off Westbrook. This routine screen somehow ends with Diaw on his back, legs splayed up in the air like the victim of a Looney Tunes haymaker.

It's odd to describe a flop as half-hearted, but that's what this one is -- Diaw takes his time getting to the floor, as though performing an annoyingly rote exercise. Still, it's enough to earn a whistle from the far sideline official, and our Flop of the Night.

BONUS FLOP: This play is also special because, while Diaw is availing himself of an opportunity to lay down on the court, Manu Ginobili and Kendrick Perkins are locked in a ridiculous flop-off on the baseline (vide0) stage right. Both put some effort into selling the contact, but it's all for naught as Diaw steals the thunder.

Thanks to @chitownalumni for catching this flop and alerting us via Twitter!

When you see an egregious flop that deserves proper recognition, send us a link to the video so we can consider it for Flop of the Night. Here's how to make your submission:
  • Alert HoopIdea to super flops with the Twitter hashtag #FlopOfTheNight (follow us on Twitter here).
  • Use the #FlopOfTheNight hashtag in Daily Dime Live.
  • E-mail us at hoopidea@gmail.com

Flop of the Night: Mario Chalmers

May, 25, 2012
5/25/12
2:11
PM ET
By Beckley Mason and Zach Harper
ESPN.com
Mario Chalmers
Jonathan Daniel/NBE/Getty Images
Mario Chalmers is reprising the role of Derek Fisher for the Heat.

HoopIdea wants to #StopTheFlop. To spotlight the biggest fakers, we present Flop of the Night. You can help us separate the pretenders from the defenders -- details below:

Mario Chalmers, who made three of four 3-pointers in Game 6, is becoming the Miami Heat's version of Lakers championship era Derek Fisher. Disruptive defense, spot up shooting ... and, of course, flopping. Chalmers has even mastered Fisher's ability to draw fouls by driving headlong into traffic and tossing the ball toward the basket.

Last night, he drew an offensive foul (video) on a moving screen from Roy Hibbert with Fisher's typical flair for the dramatic.

Working the play-by-play, ESPN's Mike Breen points out that the referee on the scene got the call right, but Jeff Van Gundy was still annoyed by Chalmers' act and suggested a flopping rule similar to the NHL's restriction on "Embellishment":
Breen: Well, Hibbert was clearly moving. You can say that he flopped, but that’s a foul.

Jeff Van Gundy: You see that’s where my flop rule will come into play. If you flop, even if you were fouled -- which he was -- you’re not gettin’ it!

Maybe Chalmers would "get it" in Jeff Van Gundy's world, but his theatrical reaction and the discussion it sparked was enough for him to get our Flop of the Night.

When you see an egregious flop that deserves proper recognition, send us a link to the video so we can consider it for Flop of the Night. Here's how to make your submission:
  • Alert HoopIdea to super flops with the Twitter hashtag #FlopOfTheNight (follow us on Twitter here).
  • Use the #FlopOfTheNight hashtag in Daily Dime Live.
  • E-mail us at hoopidea@gmail.com

Flop of the Night: Caron Butler

May, 16, 2012
5/16/12
2:27
PM ET
By Beckley Mason and Zach Harper
ESPN.com
Caron Butler
Andy Lyons/Getty Images
Caron Butler is the latest Clipper to win Flop of the Night.

HoopIdea wants to #StopTheFlop. To spotlight the biggest fakers, we present Flop of the Night. You can help us separate the pretenders from the defenders -- details below:

It was a rough night of flopping for Manu Ginobili. First, he was unable to inspire the referees to tweet -- though Twitter was noisy enough -- when he flailed on a first quarter 3-point attempt (Video).

It was the type of call Ginobili is famous for getting -- which might be why he couldn't sell it this time. As Eric Bledsoe reached in, Ginobili ripped the ball to his shot pocket and struck a distorted pose, like he wanted to shoot the ball but forgot how.

The officials' response: Silence.

Later in the game, Ginobili was even burned by one of his old tricks (Video) when Caron Butler drew a charge by stepping into Manu's path as he released a kickout pass. This sneaky play -- where the defender takes the charge after the driving player has already passed off -- is a pet peeve of many fans and has even shown up in a HoopIdea Five for Friday care of @ShotDrJr.

By the time Manu makes contact with Butler -- who appears to still be moving when he gets the call -- he has almost entirely stopped his forward momentum. But that doesn't stop Butler from flying backward and earning the call instead of flying out to the 3-point line to close out Kawhi Leonard. And that's your Flop of the Night.

When you see an egregious flop that deserves proper recognition, send us a link to the video so we can consider it for Flop of the Night. Here's how to make your submission:
  • Alert HoopIdea to super flops with the Twitter hashtag #FlopOfTheNight (follow us on Twitter here).
  • Use the #FlopOfTheNight hashtag in Daily Dime Live.
  • E-mail us at hoopidea@gmail.com

Flop of the Night: Mike Miller

May, 14, 2012
5/14/12
12:14
PM ET
By Beckley Mason and Zach Harper
ESPN.com
Mike Miller
Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE/Getty Images
Mike Miller took to the floor a few times in Game 1.

HoopIdea wants to #StopTheFlop. To spotlight the biggest fakers, we present Flop of the Night. You can help us separate the pretenders from the defenders -- details below:

Even before the Pacers and Heat took the floor in Game 1 of their second round series, we knew that flopping would be a topic. Indiana head coach Frank Vogel's comments about the Heat's habit of flopping -- and the $15,000 fine that followed -- assured as much.

Right on cue, Mike Miller earned his first Flop of The Night by toppling over on the expectation of contact from David West. Watch the video. Miller actually leans into the bump from West -- his plan here is to draw the charge so he needs to ensure at least some contact is made.

The set up is almost as unbelievable as Miller's actual fall, which lasts just under seven seconds. That's an exaggeration, of course, but it's fair to say Miller tips over in slow-motion, rather than falls. Instead of moving his feet to regain his balance, Miller, obviously intent on drawing a call, lets the kind of contact he would normally shrug off knock him to the ground.

Miller's tumble was met with silent whistles.

As Mike Tirico put it while calling the game on ABC, "You could say Frank Vogel's $15,000 paid off, at least for one play."

Runner up: LeBron James takes a shot to the throat, or so it appears.

When you see an egregious flop that deserves proper recognition, send us a link to the video so we can consider it for Flop of the Night. Here's how to make your submission:
  • Alert HoopIdea to super flops with the Twitter hashtag #FlopOfTheNight (follow us on Twitter here).
  • Use the #FlopOfTheNight hashtag in Daily Dime Live.
  • E-mail us at hoopidea@gmail.com

Flop of the Night: Marc Gasol

May, 10, 2012
5/10/12
11:21
AM ET
Mason By Beckley Mason
ESPN.com
Archive
Marc Gasol
Andy Lyons/NBAE/Getty Images
Marc Gasol and Reggie Evans have been tangled up all series.

HoopIdea wants to #StopTheFlop. To spotlight the biggest fakers, we present Flop of the Night. You can help us separate the pretenders from the defenders -- details below:

Marc Gasol and Reggie Evans have spent five games battling for paint supremacy. Tuesday they also battled for Flop of the Night by participating in a tremendous double-flop.

Let's get right to breaking down the flop footage (video), because there's a lot happening here.

As Evans comes to set a screen for Chris Paul, Gasol is already using two hands to push Evans away from where Paul wants the screen to be set. In response, Evans grabs a hold of Gasol's hand, in an apparent effort to show the ref that Gasol is fouling him -- which he is.

Evans then decides less subtle methods are necessary.

With Gasol draped across his shoulder, Evans violently raises his arms up to tell the referee "Hey! This guy is all over me!"

However when Evans raises his arms, he gives Gasol a chance to flop backwards on what looks like an elbow to the chest.

In a way, it's beautiful. Gasol fouls Evans, which isn't called. Evans works up some drama to call attention to the foul. Evans' drama, in turn, triggers' Gasol's flopping impulse, which earns the much sought-after call.

Both men flopped to the best of their ability, but to the victor goes the call, and our Flop of the Night.

Bonus flop: The theatrical exchange harkens back to this Hall of Fame double-flop between Manu Ginobili and Raja Bell, in which Bell flops so hard he accidentally "trips" Ginobili who is already mid-flop when Bell's foot touches him.

When you see an egregious flop that deserves proper recognition, send us a link to the video so we can consider it for Flop of the Night. Here's how to make your submission:
  • Alert HoopIdea to super flops with the Twitter hashtag #FlopOfTheNight (follow us on Twitter here).
  • Use the #FlopOfTheNight hashtag in Daily Dime Live.
  • E-mail us at hoopidea@gmail.com

Flop of the Night: Danilo Gallinari

May, 7, 2012
5/07/12
11:25
AM ET
Mason By Beckley Mason
ESPN.com
Archive
Danilo Gallinari
Garrett W. Ellwood/NBAE/Getty ImagesDanilo Gallinari couldn't convince the officials at the end of Game 4.

HoopIdea wants to #StopTheFlop. To spotlight the biggest fakers, we present Flop of the Night. You can help us separate the pretenders from the defenders -- details below.
Forget Flop of the Night. For the Denver Nuggets, this is the Flop of the Year.

Assuming it was a flop at all -- because this one is tricky.

In the final minutes of a 3-point game, Laker big man Pau Gasol set a pick that on some plays would have been called a foul. He leaned a shoulder into the approaching Danilo Gallinari. The contact looked painful -- that Gallinari had a big reaction is no surprise.

However, if you've learned anything from Flop of the Night, it's that in the minds of a lot of players, there's a playbook for how to deal with this kind of contact in the NBA these days: You exaggerate to get the referee's attention. It often works.

(Gallinari is in the Floppers' Club, to be sure. Video shows him to be among those who'll throw back his head in dramatic fashion while driving, for instance. And as it happens, on the Lakers' very next possession, Gallinari took the court again, this time flying 15-feet backward after mild contact from Bryant's forearm -- while Steve Blake hit a corner 3.)

This was not one of the times it worked. Not only did referee David Jones not call anything, but Gallinari also missed one of his team's most important defensive possessions of the season. Playing 5-on-4, the Nuggets scrambled for a few seconds until Ramon Sessions drained an open corner 3, putting the Lakers up three.

All the while, Gallinari writhed on the floor. Could he have gotten up and played on? Hard to say. But what seems clear is that some of what was going on was sales.

Watch the replay, and it’s clear that Gallinari got rocked.

As he bounces off Gasol’s shoulder, he covers his face, causing Marv Albert to exclaim “Gallinari took a shot to the nose!”

But once he’s on the ground, his hands move to his throat.

In super slow-motion -- Gallinari's legs kick out dramatically as he goes to the ground, an embellishment that Steve Kerr, calling the game live, suggested may have cued the official to dismiss the contact.

"I think sometimes when you exaggerate the officials will kind of give you that motion like ‘I'm not buying it, you gotta get up,'" said Kerr.

"So even if he was bumped around the throat I think his demonstrative action may have cost him the call."

When you see an egregious flop that deserves proper recognition, send us a link to the video so we can consider it for Flop of the Night. Here's how to make your submission:
  • Alert HoopIdea to super flops with the Twitter hashtag #FlopOfTheNight (follow us on Twitter here).
  • Use the #FlopOfTheNight hashtag in Daily Dime Live.
  • E-mail us at hoopidea@gmail.com

Flop of the Night: Jason Terry

May, 4, 2012
5/04/12
11:35
AM ET
By Beckley Mason and Zach Harper
ESPN.com
Jason Terry
Danny Bollinger/NBAE/Getty Images
Not even a well-timed flop could get Jason Terry and the Dallas Mavericks going last night.

HoopIdea wants to #StopTheFlop. To spotlight the biggest fakers, we present Flop of the Night. You can help us separate the pretenders from the defenders -- details below.

The Mavericks, the oldest team in the league, pulled all the old man maneuvers out of their bag of tricks to keep up with the young and talented Oklahoma City Thunder Thunder on Thursday.

With the season slipping away, Jason Terry had to try something. So as he dribbled the ball across the court, James Harden on his hip, Terry laid down a flop that contains all the classic elements you would expect from such a seasoned veteran.

Note the subtle headwhip, the way he flings out his left arm as though Harden just stuck him with a cattle prod, how he suddenly loses control of his left foot, dragging it behind him as he tumbles to the hardwood.

Was there a trip wire on the court? Did James Harden's beard exerts mystical gravitational forces that caused Terry to lose his balance?

In technique, this actually looks a lot like an egregious soccer flop, or "dive." But there are no yellow cards for simulating a foul in the NBA.

On the contrary, even though watching Harden reveals he couldn't have possibly fouled Terry, the veteran got the call -- even if the Thunder got the game.

When you see an egregious flop that deserves proper recognition, send us a link to the video so we can consider it for Flop of the Night. Here's how to make your submission:
  • Alert HoopIdea to super flops with the Twitter hashtag #FlopOfTheNight (follow us on Twitter here).
  • Use the #FlopOfTheNight hashtag in Daily Dime Live.
  • E-mail us at hoopidea@gmail.com

Flop of the Night: The Clippers!

May, 3, 2012
5/03/12
2:29
PM ET
By Beckley Mason and Zach Harper
ESPN.com
Reggie Evans, Chris Paul
NBAE/Getty ImagesChris Paul and Reggie Evans brought the flop in Game 2.

HoopIdea wants to #StopTheFlop. To spotlight the biggest fakers, we present Flop of the Night. You can help us separate the pretenders from the defenders -- details below.

We're going to single out Chris Paul and Reggie Evans here, but really, today this is a team award. The crowd in Memphis quickly caught on to the Clippers' now notorious reputation for flopping. SI's Chris Mannix captured the mood by tweeting that the Clippers were "flopping all over the place."

Though there are other instances we could mention, let's focus on video of two hysterically unconvincing flops from Paul and Evans, who have each won this award previously.

What's so incredible about these flops is that they occurred on back-to-back plays. So just as the telecast cut back from a replay of Evans flopping to the ground after running into Marc Gasol, we saw Chris Paul on this fastbreak flop, crumpling to the ground in anticipation of contact as Quincy Pondexter completely avoids Paul and dishes to Tony Allen.

It should be noted that O.J. Mayo, who epitomized the Grizzlies' relentless and cagey effort in Game 2, seemed to respond to the Clippers' flopping tactics by flopping right back. By the end of the game, as the Clippers pressured the ball all over the court in a desperate attempt to create turnovers, Mayo and Mike Conley were giving as good as they got.

Thankfully, the referees let 'em play a bit inside the Grind House. There's no love lost between these two teams, and the combination of bruising play and frequent flopping makes the officials' jobs all the more difficult.

When you see an egregious flop that deserves proper recognition, send us a link to the video so we can consider it for Flop of the Night. Here's how to make your submission:
  • Alert HoopIdea to super flops with the Twitter hashtag #FlopOfTheNight (follow us on Twitter here).
  • Use the #FlopOfTheNight hashtag in Daily Dime Live.
  • E-mail us at hoopidea@gmail.com

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