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Washington Redskins mailbag: Part 1

The first installment of this week's Washington Redskins mailbag features questions on, yes, Robert Griffin III (a reason for hope), Kirk Cousins and, completing the quarterback trifecta, Colt McCoy. Oh, and a little on Chris Neild. Enjoy.

John Keim: No. The reasons are many, but suffice to say neither one (Richard Crawford or Chase Minnifield) has a safety's build -- both are smaller players -- nor have they ever played the position. So it would take a while for them to get used to the position. It's not a simple transition. Bashaud Breeland is one who could eventually play here; he's a little bigger and more physical. But corner is more valuable and if he shows he can play that position then that's where he must stay. But you're right, they do need much better depth at safety. They do like the versatility of their top corners when it comes to playing safety in certain coverages. But that's different than being able to do it full-time. They need to find and develop some young safeties. Corner is considered the more premium position, so you absolutely need solid depth at that spot.



John Keim: He's looked fine. Can't say he stood out or anything, but he also wasn't the focal point that he was a year ago at this time when he was working with the starters. But nothing has changed regarding him since the end of the season. His value remains the same -- Cleveland offered Washington a fourth-round pick for him during the draft. I don't see that position improving unless some team gets really desperate because of a training camp injury. But I don't think Cousins is at a point where you make some panic move to bring him in right before the season, expecting him to go in and light it up. He's still a young guy with a lot to prove. He's not instant success in that sort of scenario. Besides, there's no way I'd trade him at this point. Why? I want good insurance behind Griffin because of the durability concerns.



John Keim: Mike Barwis, the trainer on this show, certainly agrees with you. I know the coaches here like him a lot, too. Sometimes you find a way to keep guys like him just because of what he adds in the locker room, how he works, etc. The problem is Neild is a backup nose tackle who provides no help in the nickel package. If the Redskins only keep six defensive linemen, then it'll be tough for Neild to make it (though injuries to others would change things). He would not be the first character guy to have been cut because, in the end, it's always a numbers game. But my guess is if they can find a way to keep him, they will. When you have bust-your-butt guys at the end of the roster, then it always helps. But it will depend on what happens at other positions.



John Keim: The unknown surrounding RG III. I say unknown because we've never seen him after a full, productive offseason -- and that's what he's had this year. Every coach I've ever covered has talked about how much improvement quarterbacks make from Year 1 to Year 2 because of the offseason. We don't know how he'll fare now that he finally has had one healthy offseason. It has to have helped, as might the improved relations with his coaches and the fact his knee is one year further from surgery. Also, in the NFL, there are always teams that finished with horrible records who make the postseason. The Redskins have a ways to go to reach that point, but some team will go from few wins to the playoffs this year.



John Keim: It's a done deal. The NFL does not announce these suspensions until the appeals process is over. Anytime you hear about a possible suspension, like Cleveland's Josh Gordon, it's because it was somehow leaked. But once it's announced? It's over. Now we can finally move on from this chapter about a guy who was discussed for two years -- yet never played a game.



John Keim: They only have three quarterbacks on the roster so if they keep all three then, yes, he'll make it. With Griffin's durability always an issue it's probably wise to have three quarterbacks just in case. McCoy is not a practice squad candidate.



John Keim: Actually, the NFC East does not have a tough schedule. Nobody in the division has a schedule rated in the top 16 (based on opponents' 2013 winning percentage). It's tough to gauge a schedule's strength based on what a team did a year ago, but it's the way it's done. And it's very hard to go through and guess how a team will do based on offseason pickups -- some will improve, others will not. So I'll just go based off winning percentage for now. According to this metric, the Redskins have the NFL's 17th hardest schedule as their opponents had a .490 winning percentage in 2013. That's also the hardest one in the NFC East. The others: No. 18 Dallas (.488), No. 20 Philadelphia (.479) and No. 26 New York (.465). Remember, those teams' schedules look easier because of Washington's 3-13 mark.