Washington Redskins: Chris Neild

Examining the Washington Redskins' roster:

Quarterbacks (3)

Jay Gruden only had two quarterbacks in each of his three seasons with Cincinnati, but Griffin still needs to prove his durability. If something happened to him, they woulld still be in good shape with Cousins and McCoy. If they go with two then McCoy gets left off.

Running backs (4)

The Redskins could also stash Chris Thompson on the practice squad as further insurance. Thompson can easily bump himself onto the roster with a good summer; he’s a good fit in Gruden’s offense and the new coach liked Thompson coming out of college. But durability is an issue. By keeping four here, the Redskins can go with an extra player at another spot. This means Evan Royster is on the outs, but he doesn’t give the Redskins anything they don’t have in better players. He is insurance only.

Receivers (6)

I am not cutting Leonard Hankerson, rather I’m just not sold that he will be on the active roster at the start of the season. If he shows this summer that he can play, then, yes, I would have him on the 53-man roster. But the Redskins were not sure what to expect from him and when he might be healthy. Therefore, I can see him taking a little longer to return. Gruden likes Moss and they drafted Grant. Robinson needs to take a step.

Tight ends (3)

Rookie tight end Ted Bolser would head to the practice squad, where he can develop. He didn’t look close to a roster spot just based on how he looked this spring. Reed is firmly entrenched as the starter with Paulsen their top blocker and Paul a special teams ace.

Offensive line (10)

In reality, I could see them keeping only nine offensive linemen. It all depends on how Long and/or LeRibeus looks at guard. They love Long -- Gruden has said he could compete immediately -- so if he shows he can play, then they could cut Chester (which I don't think will happen; I think he'll start). Compton is a little surprise, but they like him as well. This position will be fluid and I’m not sold on the 10 I have listed.

Defensive line (6)


This one is fluid as well because it depends in part on Bowen’s health. I like Chris Neild and so do they, but can they keep him? Golston is more versatile and a key player on special teams, but he’s also 30 and they must get younger at some point. But he still helps in too many ways.

Linebackers (9)

As of now I’d have Rob Jackson out, especially if Jenkins develops as a pass-rusher. But this will be a close race. And I have them keeping an extra guy inside in Hayward because of his special teams ability.

Cornerbacks (5)
Chase Minnifield remains eligible for the practice squad. Richard Crawford is coming off a knee injury and it’s hard to place him on here without seeing him play. The one benefit for Crawford is that he can play in the slot; they need depth at that spot.

Safeties (4)

I really don’t feel good about this position and am not confident that I have this one right, at least for that final spot. Robinson’s special teams ability gives him the edge over Bacarri Rambo, who must have a strong camp. Akeem Davis can help on special teams, but with no NFL experience he will be stashed on the practice squad.

Specialists (3)

The Forbath selection is based on never having seen rookie Zach Hocker kick in an NFL game. If Hocker is consistent this summer and shows a strong leg, then he can win the job.

Washington Redskins mailbag: Part 1

July, 11, 2014
7/11/14
1:00
PM ET
The first installment of this week's Washington Redskins mailbag features questions on, yes, Robert Griffin III (a reason for hope), Kirk Cousins and, completing the quarterback trifecta, Colt McCoy. Oh, and a little on Chris Neild. Enjoy.
John Keim: No. The reasons are many, but suffice to say neither one (Richard Crawford or Chase Minnifield) has a safety's build -- both are smaller players -- nor have they ever played the position. So it would take a while for them to get used to the position. It's not a simple transition. Bashaud Breeland is one who could eventually play here; he's a little bigger and more physical. But corner is more valuable and if he shows he can play that position then that's where he must stay. But you're right, they do need much better depth at safety. They do like the versatility of their top corners when it comes to playing safety in certain coverages. But that's different than being able to do it full-time. They need to find and develop some young safeties. Corner is considered the more premium position, so you absolutely need solid depth at that spot.

John Keim: He's looked fine. Can't say he stood out or anything, but he also wasn't the focal point that he was a year ago at this time when he was working with the starters. But nothing has changed regarding him since the end of the season. His value remains the same -- Cleveland offered Washington a fourth-round pick for him during the draft. I don't see that position improving unless some team gets really desperate because of a training camp injury. But I don't think Cousins is at a point where you make some panic move to bring him in right before the season, expecting him to go in and light it up. He's still a young guy with a lot to prove. He's not instant success in that sort of scenario. Besides, there's no way I'd trade him at this point. Why? I want good insurance behind Griffin because of the durability concerns.

John Keim: Mike Barwis, the trainer on this show, certainly agrees with you. I know the coaches here like him a lot, too. Sometimes you find a way to keep guys like him just because of what he adds in the locker room, how he works, etc. The problem is Neild is a backup nose tackle who provides no help in the nickel package. If the Redskins only keep six defensive linemen, then it'll be tough for Neild to make it (though injuries to others would change things). He would not be the first character guy to have been cut because, in the end, it's always a numbers game. But my guess is if they can find a way to keep him, they will. When you have bust-your-butt guys at the end of the roster, then it always helps. But it will depend on what happens at other positions.

John Keim: The unknown surrounding RG III. I say unknown because we've never seen him after a full, productive offseason -- and that's what he's had this year. Every coach I've ever covered has talked about how much improvement quarterbacks make from Year 1 to Year 2 because of the offseason. We don't know how he'll fare now that he finally has had one healthy offseason. It has to have helped, as might the improved relations with his coaches and the fact his knee is one year further from surgery. Also, in the NFL, there are always teams that finished with horrible records who make the postseason. The Redskins have a ways to go to reach that point, but some team will go from few wins to the playoffs this year.

John Keim: It's a done deal. The NFL does not announce these suspensions until the appeals process is over. Anytime you hear about a possible suspension, like Cleveland's Josh Gordon, it's because it was somehow leaked. But once it's announced? It's over. Now we can finally move on from this chapter about a guy who was discussed for two years -- yet never played a game.

John Keim: They only have three quarterbacks on the roster so if they keep all three then, yes, he'll make it. With Griffin's durability always an issue it's probably wise to have three quarterbacks just in case. McCoy is not a practice squad candidate.

John Keim: Actually, the NFC East does not have a tough schedule. Nobody in the division has a schedule rated in the top 16 (based on opponents' 2013 winning percentage). It's tough to gauge a schedule's strength based on what a team did a year ago, but it's the way it's done. And it's very hard to go through and guess how a team will do based on offseason pickups -- some will improve, others will not. So I'll just go based off winning percentage for now. According to this metric, the Redskins have the NFL's 17th hardest schedule as their opponents had a .490 winning percentage in 2013. That's also the hardest one in the NFC East. The others: No. 18 Dallas (.488), No. 20 Philadelphia (.479) and No. 26 New York (.465). Remember, those teams' schedules look easier because of Washington's 3-13 mark.  

The guy coming off the record-setting season opted for the same trainer as the one just trying to hang on. Washington Redskins wide receiver Pierre Garcon wants to build on 2013; Chris Neild wants to make the roster. And Mike Barwis worked with both toward that goal -- as the series, "American Muscle," will highlight.

Neild
Barwis, a senior advisor to the New York Mets and a consultant for the Miami Dolphins, has long worked with Neild and became a strong admirer years ago. This past offseason was the first time he worked with Garcon, who wanted to improve his explosiveness with route-running.

Barwis worked with a number of other pros, including Seattle Seahawks corner Richard Sherman and Detroit Lions defensive lineman Ndamukong Suh, both of whom also will be part of the series that begins at 9 p.m. ET Wednesday on the Discovery Channel. Garcon will be part of a later episode, though Neild will be on Wednesday night.

Neild spent nearly two months working out with Barwis, who said Garcon's stay was considerably shorter because what he wanted to achieve was more specific. But Neild also has worked with Barwis since his freshman season at West Virginia.

"Chris is blood to me," Barwis said. "He's an absolute warrior. His mentality is incredible. He's one of the major aspects of the premier of our show. ...You won't find a lot who are tougher and work harder than Chris."

For Neild, spending so much time with Barwis could make the difference in making the roster. He's already lasted three seasons, but if the Redskins keep six defensive linemen as they've done in the past, then Neild has work to do. He's not as versatile as some of the other defensive linemen because he's just a nose tackle.

But Barwis, who said he has trained more than 500 Olympic and professional athletes in his career, said Neild stands out.

"He always makes the chemistry better," he said. "He's the soldier. He's the one who will fight. He gives everything he has to be good. ...That type of attitude and charisma is what builds championship teams."

Garcon
Garcon
They focused on helping Neild with the demands of the position, with the need to take on two blockers with regularity. Neild benches more than 450 pounds and squats better than 600. They worked on nutrition, supplements as well as balance and functional training to better control your body; increasing the ability to play with leverage, working on increasing explosiveness through plyometrics, among other means.

"It's a lifestyle," Barwis said.

Garcon's stint wasn't as involved. Barwis said he wanted to refine his speed and running mechanics. He did not want to get specific with what Garcon did, but, in general it could involve minute details. For example, Barwis works on his clients on where their toes should be pointed when their foot is off the ground (up; leads to better explosion when you hit the ground). Or on where his body should be when you cut.

"Pierre was a very disciplined guy and a very hard worker," Barwis said. "Very coachable. He's a guy that stays focused. He's soft spoken and he gets after it. He's a great leader by example, does what he has to do and works hard.

"He's a tremendous athlete. The thing that's neat to me is when you get top athletes like that and they still want to be better and are still focused on how to make themselves two steps quicker. The kid is saying, ‘I'm not satisfied with having a record year.'"
A little this and that:

Bronzed: Baylor announced plans to build a statue of quarterback Robert Griffin III at its new stadium when it opens in August. This had been in the works for a while – Griffin knew about the possibility during the season and, in fact, had photos taken of him for the project a year ago-- but the project was completed in May. The 9-foot statue will be unveiled before Baylor’s game against SMU on Aug. 31. Griffin is Baylor’s lone Heisman Trophy winner and obviously was given a lot of credit for Baylor’s rise. At some point the school will have to find a way to honor its coach, Art Briles (perhaps when he’s done there).

On second thought: Ben Tribbett, hired by the Redskins as a blogger to help in the name battle, announced his resignation via Twitter after only two weeks. Tribbett said on Twitter that, “I don’t want to be a distraction to the team as the political attacks have shifted towards being personal towards me.” He added in a separate tweet that he wanted the debate to be over the name and not over what anything he has said or done in the past. Tribbett, considered a liberal blogger, had been vocal in his support of the name in the past. But he’s also the one who wrote harshly about former Virginia Governor and Senator George Allen after he used the word “macacca” in a 2006 campaign. And Indian Country Today wrote about a few missteps by Tribbett in the past, including a tweet about an encounter at a casino. Tribbett tweeted, “Just took Chief for his last 300. I’d call it a scalping but that seems uncalled for.” Another move that backfired on the Redskins. Regardless of where you stand on this issue, their attempts to win the public over on the name front have not helped.

American Muscle: Receiver Pierre Garcon and nose tackle Chris Neild both will appear on the Discovery Channel series "American Muscle" this summer (it debuts at 9 p.m. Wednesday). I’ll be talking to Mike Barwis, who worked with them on the show, Tuesday morning for a post later in the day. I'm curious to hear how this came about and what sort of work they did. Neild is on the bubble this camp while Garcon is coming off a record season. A key part of Garcon’s game is his ability to play physical. I’d say it’s underrated, but I don’t think that’s the case so I guess I won’t say that. But it does allow him to be effective on bubble screens and other short routes because he has an ability to break tackles. Among other players featured on the show: Seattle corner Richard Sherman.

Lauvao’s progress: Redskins offensive line coach Chris Foerster said of new guard Shawn Lauvao last month: “He got better every day. It was all new to him. He needs to get out there and play. He’s more of a practice guy; he needs to be out there doing it. Trent [Williams] can make a lot of guys look good when they play next to him. He’s doing a good job with Shawn teaching him how to do things and [Lauvao] made huge strides from voluntary minicamp.”

Oops! A college student was asked his opinion on the Redskins name – and it turned out to be a break the police in another town needed. Jacob Close, 25, and a Bloomsburg (Pennsylvania) University student, was spotted by Ithaca, New York, police in the Bloomsburg Press Enterprise after his picture ran in conjunction with a story on the Redskins name. Turns out Close was wanted for jumping bail in a drug/DUI-related case, according to the Press Enterprise. The paper reported that campus police had been searching for him for more than a month after being contacted by Ithaca City Police in May. For what it’s worth, Close said the team should keep the nickname but change the mascot to a potato.
The Washington Redskins' 12-member draft class in 2011 was supposed to yield a number of key players. With those players entering the final year of their original contracts, it has not lived up to expectations -- or hopes. As of now, only one player will enter the season as a guaranteed starter and by this time next year it could well be that only a couple players remain from this group. Injuries didn't help as five of these players have missed an entire season or a substantial part of a year. Here's a look at how they stand:

Kerrigan
LB Ryan Kerrigan (first round): Established as the starting left outside linebacker. He’s become a solid player for Washington and was off to a terrific start last season with 6.5 sacks in the first seven games. Kerrigan injured his knee and, though he said it did not cause any dropoff in his play, he also admitted he lost a little explosiveness because of how it felt (he had just two sacks in the final nine games). Like Brian Orakpo, he should benefit from the arrival of outside linebackers coach Brian Baker, defensive end Jason Hatcher and rookie linebacker Trent Murphy. Kerrigan does well moving around and rushing from the inside. He’ll need to get out of the habit of trying to mostly rush with contain. But if others are being effective, Kerrigan will have a solid year with his relentless style. The Redskins gave him the fifth-year extension, so he will return next season -- as he should.

DE Jarvis Jenkins (second round): Not even guaranteed to start this year, though he’ll definitely be in the rotation. And if he does start, he likely won’t play as much in the nickel until he proves he can help as a pass-rusher -- something he has yet to do. Jenkins can be valuable at helping against the run. He needs a strong year to garner another contract from the Redskins.

Hankerson
WR Leonard Hankerson (third round): There’s no guarantee he’ll even be ready to start the season. He’s been inconsistent and has never become the player Washington’s previous staff hoped he would be. Injuries haven’t helped him at all. But Hankerson lacks any sort of explosiveness after the catch. He’ll have a tough time this season coming off his knee injury. Not the way he’d want to enter a contract year.

RB Roy Helu (fourth round): He can still help, but what he’s proven is that while he can at times look excellent in the open field he’s not a patient runner from scrimmage, leading to too many short runs. The Redskins drafted Lache Seastrunk, but Helu has a big edge over him in the pass game. It’s not just about catching the ball, it’s about knowing how to run routes and pick up blitzes and recognize coverages. Don’t underestimate that aspect of the job because it’s huge. But if Seastrunk improves and shows he can be more than a runner from spread formation, then Helu’s future beyond 2014 is in doubt. For now, he’s insurance if something happens to Alfred Morris.

S DeJon Gomes (fifth round): The Redskins cut him before the 2013 season and he was picked up by Detroit. He’s still with the Lions, but will be a reserve and special teamer. He never developed in Washington.

TE Niles Paul (fifth round): Entered as a receiver with decent speed, but was more known for his blocking on the edge as a rookie and then moved to tight end in his second season (after some discussion of trying safety instead). Paul hasn’t become the sort of tight end the coaches felt he might, but he was better last year than in 2012. Still, he’s a third tight end who can block on the move. The Redskins drafted Ted Bolser, but based on watching his college tape and again this spring, he did not seem like a real threat to unseat Paul. The latter is a key special teams player, too. He’s a tough guy and adds a lot on that unit.

Royster
Royster
RB Evan Royster (sixth round): Will enter once again as a guy on the bubble. He was insurance last year and carried the ball twice and caught one pass. With Morris, Helu and Seastrunk, it’s hard to imagine Royster being anything other than insurance again. It will depend, too, on how Chris Thompson looks this summer -- and how many backs Jay Gruden wants to keep. Tough to see Royster being around in 2015.

WR Aldrick Robinson (sixth round): He improved down the stretch, but to expect a big leap this season would require much faith. Robinson has had to learn how to run routes at the proper speed and depth, something he did get better at in 2013. But like Hankerson he needs to improve his consistency. At best he’s a fourth receiver this season and if Ryan Grant progresses, he’ll eventually bump him from this role (not a lock for that to be the case this year however; Grant needs to get a lot stronger). Another guy who could be gone after this season.

CB Brandyn Thompson (seventh round): Cut before the 2012 season; now plays for Ottawa in the CFL.

OT Maurice Hurt (seventh round): Has never really looked in great shape. He missed all of last season with a knee injury and will have a tough time making the roster. Worked at right tackle in the spring. He’s not a right tackle.

LB Markus White (seventh round): He looked the part, but never quite grasped the position. Cut during the 2012 season. He spent time with Tampa Bay that season, but was cut last August. He now plays for Saskatchewan in the CFL.

NT Chris Neild (seventh round): Opened with a flash as a rookie with two sacks early in the season. His game, though, is not built on sacks so that was an anomaly. He’s a try-hard guy, but will have a real tough time making the roster.

Redskins minicamp observations

June, 17, 2014
6/17/14
4:15
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Thoughts and observations after watching the Washington Redskins practice Tuesday:

1. David Amerson looks bigger and, indeed, he said he's added about six or seven pounds of muscle. Amerson does appear to have more toned arms. That will help when he plays press coverage and in run support. I'll have more on Amerson later this summer, but know this: He's had a good spring. Saw him stick with Pierre Garcon in a couple one-on-one occasions. Also, more importantly, saw him use his eyes better and more consistently. It was an issue last year.

[+] EnlargeDavid Amerson
Geoff Burke/USA TODAY SportsRedskins CB David Amerson appears to have gained some muscle weight this offseason.
2. Did see Garcon get him on one crossing route. Amerson tried to jam him, putting his right hand onto Garcon's outside shoulder. But Garcon's strength helped him here as he wasn't knocked off stride and created separation running across the middle.

3. Saw this for the first time: a receiver doing a spin move at the line to get away from press coverage. Garcon tried that against Amerson, but it didn't work. Amerson stayed patient and, partly because he didn't try to jam Garcon, was not fooled by the move.

4. Garcon dunked a ball after a catch in the end zone. The Redskins had college officials at practice and one immediately threw a flag. Players can no longer dunk over the goal posts.

5. The offensive players were convinced Amerson should have been called for holding on a back-shoulder attempt to tight end Jordan Reed in the end zone. I was just finishing up an interview with Amerson after practice when Reed walked past with a smile and asked, "Did he tell you he held me?"

6. Rookie receiver Ryan Grant had a few nice grabs Tuesday, mostly on underneath routes against zone coverage. He's good at driving the defender off and then cutting. Did it a couple times Tuesday. I don't know when he'll be able to really help because he has to get stronger and, ultimately, prove he can beat press coverage.

7. One coach I will enjoy listening and paying attention to this summer: outside linebackers coach Brian Baker. Yes, I know, I've mentioned him a few times, but after watching him work with the players I'm even more convinced of his impact. Just a detailed coach. I'll have more on that later this week. But he is good and isn't afraid to chastise anyone. Heard him ping rookie Trent Murphy during a drill Tuesday morning.

8. Murphy was juked out by Reed on one route. He can ask other veteran linebackers how that feels because that's what happened last year. Once more, Reed was among the last off the field after working more on his game. Nothing has changed since last year in that regard.

9. Reed also had a nice block on Murphy, getting his hands into the rookie's chest and pushing him to the ground.

10. With linebacker Brian Orakpo out (sickness), this was a good chance for Murphy to work against veterans. He also went against left tackle Trent Williams a few times. Murphy's spin move worked well against Moses, but Williams was able to stop it on the one time I saw it tried. The coaches like what they've seen from Murphy overall, especially off the field in terms of work ethic.

11. Rookie running back Lache Seastrunk, who lost the ball on a handoff in practice, stayed afterward to work on handoffs with fullback Darrel Young playing the part of the quarterback.

12. Kedric Golston worked at nose tackle with the first defensive line. He's done that in previous workouts this spring with Barry Cofield sidelined. And if he shows it's a spot he can help at during the summer, then it'll be tough to cut him. Golston adds experience and toughness up front, two qualities that should be welcomed. Add a little versatility and it makes him even more valuable, and it also makes it tough for Chris Neild to make the roster.

13. The quarterbacks worked on slant passes during drills with receivers. The quarterbacks dropped back, looked down the middle and then turned toward the receiver running the slant. It's a little thing, but I point it out for this reason: Robert Griffin III's last interception in 2013 came on a slant route. He eyed the receiver the whole way, who then got a good break to make the pick. Sometimes you have to eye the receiver off the line because the pass is coming right away. But in this case it led to the pick.

14. Wasn't able to spend a lot of time watching rookie right tackle Morgan Moses, but did see him get beat by second-year Brandon Jenkins to the outside on one occasion. Moses was too upright and a bit slow with his feet.

15. Jenkins failed to use the proper technique on an inside run, staying too wide and creating a gap inside. The coaches, um, reminded him of the mistake.

16. Said it last week and will continue to point out how much more energy there is during these practices. Some of that could just be because change brings a new energy. But some of it is the style of coaches they now have on staff. Raheem Morris was always vocal under Mike Shanahan, so his ribbing of players and coaches is nothing new. But things were just more lively Tuesday, with trash talking and banter.

17. The field goal kickers attempted three kicks apiece (from 39, 44 and 50 yards) at the narrow goal posts (about half the width of regular ones). Rookie Zach Hocker made all three attempts -- the ball jumped off his foot on the 50-yarder. Kai Forbath missed two of three but on regular goal posts he would have made each attempt.

18. Quarterback Kirk Cousins had a nice bullet to receiver Aldrick Robinson; the pass arrived just before safety Bacarri Rambo for a touchdown.

Redskins injury updates

May, 29, 2014
5/29/14
7:30
PM ET
ASHBURN, Va. -- A few injury updates:
  • Receiver DeSean Jackson tweaked his left hamstring, but coach Jay Gruden called it a minor pull. Gruden said Jackson has had a good camp so far and that they just want to make sure he’s “right” when it comes to his health.
  • Nose tackle Barry Cofield had hernia surgery recently and will miss the rest of the OTA sessions. Gruden said they are hoping to have him full-go by the start of training camp and said, “He should be in good shape.”
  • Chris Neild and Kedric Golston worked as the first two nose tackles with Cofield out of the lineup.
  • Receiver Leonard Hankerson also continues to rehab his ACL injury. Both he and cornerback Richard Crawford, who tore multiple ligaments, ran on the side Thursday. Hankerson was not running as fast as he could and still looked affected by his knee. “We don’t want to rush him back,” Gruden said. “Let’s get him back 100 percent, whether the time is the start of training camp, middle of training camp, third game.”
  • Safety Phillip Thomas is practicing after missing last season with a Lisfranc injury. It can be a tricky injury to recover from, especially if the athlete has surgery, as Thomas did. But Thomas said he feels normal when running on the field.
  • Defensive end Stephen Bowen, recovering from microfracture surgery, did a little work off to the side. He did not expect to return by now, so his limited work is not a surprise.
  • Cornerback Tracy Porter, recovering from shoulder surgery, also ran off to the side.
 

Thoughts and observations from the Redskins OTA session Thursday (taking a look at big picture things here rather than practice plays made in the spring):

  1. Robert Griffin III worked on being more consistent with his mechanics in the offseason and there was a difference. The past two years his base was wider as the Redskins wanted to shorten the stride. He also got into a habit of holding the ball lower, leading to a longer windup when he threw.
  2. But in practice Thursday, Griffin held the ball higher – at the top of the numbers. He also threw with a more narrow base. He likes doing this because he feels more free, giving him the ability to bounce the pocket a little better. Not every quarterback throws with the same base, much like not every hitter uses the same stance at the plate.
  3. [+] EnlargeRobert Griffin III
    AP Photo/Richard LipskiRobert Griffin III showed off his new throwing mechanics during practice on Thursday.
    Griffin also was throwing more over the top; less windup. So the ball came out a little quicker. He was not always accurate, but he was not off as much as he was, say, last summer when coming back in training camp. And keep in mind that even as a rookie in practice Griffin would have off days throwing the ball.
  4. Regardless, Griffin’s fundamentals were more consistent than they were during the season. The key will be transferring it to the season when it gets chaotic in the pocket.
  5. His weight transfer was different as well; much more quiet but a definite transfer. Saw it on a deep ball to receiver DeSean Jackson.
  6. Griffin escaped the pocket on one play and looked like he was going to tuck and run. But he pulled up before he crossed the line and hit Pierre Garcon along the sidelines.
  7. Keenan Robinson lined up next to Perry Riley with the No. 1 defense. It’s only May, but it’s still telling when considering that he missed all of last season and part of his rookie year. They also signed Darryl Sharpton and Akeem Jordan, who worked with the second team. Adam Hayward also worked some with the second team at inside linebacker.
  8. The linebackers’ versatility will be a huge part of the defense this season, as you would expect. The key is that they now have three outside linebackers – Brian Orakpo, Ryan Kerrigan and Trent Murphy -- who are comfortable with their hands in the dirt, rushing from a two-point stance or dropping into coverage.
  9. Murphy beat Tom Compton during 11-on-11 work with a quick spin move to the inside. For a tall guy, Murphy does a nice job staying low on his spin.
  10. Second-year linebacker Brandon Jenkins was mostly limited to rushing the passer last season, but saw him in coverage some Thursday.
  11. Here are the players I saw returning kicks Thursday: Lache Seastrunk, Chris Thompson, Nick Williams, Andre Roberts and Rashad Ross.
  12. Chris Baker lined up at left end with the starting defense (keep in mind Stephen Bowen can’t work). Chris Neild was in the middle with Barry Cofield sidelined (hernia surgery) and Jason Hatcher was on the right side.
  13. Rookie corner Bashaud Breeland still needs to be less grabby. Saw him tugging Santana Moss’ jersey downfield before the veteran caught the ball. Saw Breeland tugging other jerseys as they broke on a route (after the allotted five yards of contact). Not sure all the receivers quite appreciated his hands.
  14. Breeland was beaten on a double move by receiver Pierre Garcon. One thing Breeland said he needed to do was to keep his eyes on his man. He lost him this time, peeking too long into the backfield and awaiting a throw that wasn’t coming. Instead, it turned into an easy deep completion.
  15. Maurice Hurt worked at right tackle with the third unit. Josh LeRibeus worked at left guard with the second unit.
  16. Jackson’s speed was evident, especially on an end around. He was in traffic as he ran around the end, on the side opposite the media so it was hard to tell who it was at first. But he was moving at a different speed, which was the first clue as to who it was.
  17. Corner Chase Minnifield will get into a lot of tussles this camp – a safe prediction. He nearly got into one with tight end Niles Paul Thursday. Minnifield is physical and feisty and that will never please those running routes in practice. This time, Minnifield was grabbing Paul on the entire route and at the end Paul shoved him. Minnifield bounced up and shoved him back. It didn’t escalate.
  18. Minnifield did pick off a Kirk Cousins pass in zone coverage. Minnifield sank deep on the route and grabbed a pass that was intended for Williams.
  19. It was tough to see running back Chris Thompson’s speed last season, whether in spring, summer or before he was shut down during the season. He was coming off a knee injury. But he’s a year removed from that injury and the speed was more evident. Still worry about his durability, but he looked fast after running with a pass in the open field (during a spring practice).
  20. Safety Tanard Jackson ran with the third defense.
  21. Corner David Amerson looks more comfortable in press coverage and is using his long arms to his advantage when jamming receivers. Saw him do this a couple times, showing good technique and not getting beat in this look. It’s something he needed to work on as a rookie and I’m sure the learning curve will continue. But with his length and speed it’s a necessary tactic for him to learn.

 

Contract breakdowns: Moss, Geathers

March, 18, 2014
3/18/14
12:00
PM ET
Santana Moss is not a lock to make the team. The Washington Redskins expect Clifton Geathers to be on the roster. That’s the assumption one can make after checking out their contracts.

Moss
Neither one of those statements is a big surprise; when Moss was signed, myself and others wrote that he was not guaranteed anything. His contract backs that up as Moss only received a veteran minimum deal -- a $65,000 signing bonus and a base salary of $955,000 (but he would only count $635,000 against the salary cap if he makes the roster. The minimum salary benefit takes effect so his base, for cap purposes, would be $570,000).

The only guaranteed cash in the deal for Moss is the signing bonus. The Redskins still think he might be able to help, hence the sort of contract he signed. But I doubt their quest to add another receiver will end; indeed, Kenny Britt is visiting Tuesday. Also, if Leonard Hankerson is healthy and looks good in training camp, that wouldn’t be good news for Moss, unless the 34-year old shows he can still play. But Hankerson and newly-signed Andre Roberts can play in the slot. Aldrick Robinson can as well, but not to the same level as the other two.

Geathers
As for Geathers, his two-year deal came with a $500,000 signing bonus. The base salary of $1.075 million is more than what veteran Kedric Golston will receive -- this year or next. And they’d be out $750,000 if Geathers is somehow cut. Geathers was a backup in Philadelphia last season -- he had the fifth most snaps of their lineman with 321 -- and is now with his sixth team at age 26.

The Redskins currently have eight defensive linemen on the roster who could be fighting for six or seven spots; they kept six entering the 2012 season and seven entering 2013. Here are the eight Geathers, Golston, Stephen Bowen, Jason Hatcher, Barry Cofield, Chris Neild, Chris Baker and Jarvis Jenkins.

A lot of this will depend on Bowen’s health, but it also means that Adam Carriker, released two weeks ago, would have to show an awful lot if the Redskins do grant him a workout in June to gauge his progress.

Here is Geathers' contract breakdown, courtesy of ESPN Stats & Information:

2014
Base salary: $1.075 million
Cap hit: $1.35 million
Note: $250,000 of his base salary is fully guaranteed. He also receives a $25,000 workout bonus.

2015
Base salary: $1.575 million
Cap hit: $1.85 million
Note: The cap hit also reflects a $25,000 workout bonus in addition to his prorated bonus.

Positional outlook: defensive line

February, 13, 2014
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The Redskins will have decisions to make this offseason -- and would be wise to add more youth to this group. They must decide what to do with Stephen Bowen and Adam Carriker. Both carry big cap numbers; both are coming off injuries. My guess is that they will release one or two players, but for now that's just a guess. Both of these players have value if healthy. Regardless, they need to generate more pressure up front -- like they did in 2011. Problem is, two years can be a long time in the NFL so it could be hard for some players to play the way they did just a short time ago.

DE Stephen Bowen
He did not make an impact in the rush game like he had the previous two years. I thought, with Brian Orakpo back, that Bowen would benefit. He and Orakpo worked so well together in 2011, but it did not result in more pressure. Bowen still played the run fine; he keeps a pretty strong base and that helps take on double-teams. But the problem with Bowen is that he turns 30 in March and is coming off microfracture surgery on his knee. That’s a bad combination. The Redskins could save $2 million in cap space if they released him. Certainly he could come back at a lower deal and that has to be an option, but I worry about that knee.
2014: Elsewhere; depends on the knee
Contract status: Signed through 2015

NT Barry Cofield
I like his game, but he’s not the NFL’s best nose tackle as the Redskins hoped he would become. But he is more than capable. Cofield started slow last season because of the club on his right hand, but once that was removed he played at a high level for several games and then some. He’s excellent at moving laterally and played with more anticipation, especially when it came to knowing the blocking schemes. Cofield is an effective nose tackle and capable of making plays others at his position can’t make because of his athleticism. He also received a lot of double-teams.
2014: Starter
Contract status: Signed through 2016

DE/NT Chris Baker
He is more suited for end, but can play inside as well making him a valuable backup if nothing else. But Baker can be more than that. He played more toward the end of the season and did a solid job. He plays low, keeping a strong base, and would stand up guards. He runs fairly well for a guy his size. He loves to get penetration, which is not always desired from a 3-4 defensive lineman. They need to keep him around.
2014: Fringe starter
Contract status: Free agent as of March 11

DE Jarvis Jenkins
He hasn’t become the pass-rushing threat the Redskins hoped he would become. He still tends to get too high after a couple of steps, but he did do a little better in that area this past season (and finally got to the quarterback a couple of times). Jenkins can play with strength against double-teams. But he needs to give them more in nickel situations.
2014: Starter
Contract status: Signed through 2014

DE Kedric Golston
He hasn’t changed a whole lot over the past few years, but that’s a good thing. Golston just does what he’s asked and usually does an excellent job as a reserve. Golston is not a playmaker, but he understands how to prepare and how to play. He’s good to have around.
2014: Backup
Contract status: Signed through 2015

NT Chris Neild
He’s more of a traditional nose tackle and best suited in a reserve role. Neild is a little like Golston in that he knows what he’s on the field to do and he executes it as well as he can. In short spurts Neild does fine and plays hard. There’s room for guys like him.
2014: Backup
Contract status: Signed through 2014

DE Adam Carriker
Missed the entire season because of multiple surgeries on his torn quadriceps. Few would try to return from that, but Carriker continues to work toward a comeback. It’s hard to imagine him returning at his current cap figure ($6.5 million) and even he must realize he's fighting tough odds just to get back to a certain level. The past two years have been a shame (he’s missed all but two games) because he was playing at the highest level of his career before getting hurt.
2014: Bubble
Contract status: Signed through 2014

DE Doug Worthington
He’s continued to stick around, though he missed all of last season with a biceps injury. Worthington plays strong, which makes him a help against the run. He’s not much of a threat as a pass-rusher.
2014: Bubble/elsewhere
Contract status: Signed through 2014

Josh Morgan inactive for Redskins

November, 17, 2013
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PHILADELPHIA -- The Washington Redskins hoped wide receiver Josh Morgan could develop into a solid No. 2 receiver. Then they hoped he could fill in as a kick and punt returner. But Morgan hasn't accomplished any of that and, Sunday, he was made inactive.
Morgan
The Redskins placed Morgan on their seven-man inactive list for their game against the Philadelphia Eagles. Morgan, in the final year of his contract, had not made an impact at receiver or as a returner. The latter isn't surprising because Morgan had not returned punts in the NFL -- and only returned seven while at Virginia Tech. Morgan was surpassed as the starting Z receiver by third-year Leonard Hankerson, who is not a big playmaker but has been more productive than Morgan.

This also means undrafted rookie free agent Nick Williams will return punts in his NFL debut. He was signed off the practice squad during the week. Williams returned four punts for a touchdown in college.

Also inactive for Washington: quarterback Rex Grossman, guard Josh LeRibeus, safety Jose Gumbs, linebacker Brandon Jenkins, tight end Fred Davis and nose tackle Chris Neild. Jenkins was active in the first game against Philadelphia as the Redskins wanted more speed in their rush

For the Eagles, the inactives are quarterback Michael Vick, safety Earl Wolff, linebacker Mychal Kendricks, cornerback Bradley Fletcher, linebacker Jake Knott, receiver Damaris Johnson and tackle Dennis Kelly. Banged-up left tackle Jason Peters will start.

Redskins' Fred Davis inactive again

November, 7, 2013
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MINNEAPOLIS -- Washington Redskins tight end Fred Davis was put on the inactive list for Thursday's game against the Minnesota Vikings. This time it will cost him.

Davis
Davis needed to be active for 12 games this season in order to collect a $500,000 bonus. The initial reason for that bonus was because of Davis' Achilles' injury that ended is 2012 season. The Redskins wanted to protect themselves if he couldn't play much this season -- and reward him if he could. Davis has been a healthy inactive the past four games; he sat out one game because of a sprained ankle.

The emergence of rookie Jordan Reed, who leads all NFL rookies with 38 receptions, and the fact that Davis does not play special teams have kept him inactive. Niles Paul is actually the fourth tight end, but he is active because of his special-teams performance.

There weren't any surprises among the other inactives: quarterback Rex Grossman, running back Chris Thompson, safety Jose Gumbs, offensive lineman Josh LeRibeus, linebacker Brandon Jenkins and nose tackle Chris Neild. Jenkins was active last week as the Redskins wanted more speed in the pass rush. Thursday, veteran Darryl Tapp will be active instead.

Leonard Hankerson says he'll play Sunday

October, 24, 2013
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ASHBURN, Va. -- Washington Redskins receiver Leonard Hankerson said he hurt his right foot Monday when racing his kids up and down the stairs at his home.

Hankerson
He was limited for a second consecutive day in practice and said his foot remains slightly bruised. But Hankerson said he expects to play Sunday.

“I feel good,” he said. “I have to keep doing treatment and keep getting better.”

Hankerson, the Redskins’ starting Z receiver, said he was just having fun with his kids when his foot knocked into the stairs. He said he was wearing shower shoes at the time.

“Things happen,” he said. “You’re always gonna play around with your kids no matter what. It happens.”

Adding insult to injury: Hankerson lost the race.

"I tripped up and they kept going and left me," he said.

Also limited: defensive end Stephen Bowen (knee), nose tackle Chris Neild (calf) and safety Reed Doughty (concussion).

Redskins injury report: Healthy roster

October, 18, 2013
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ASHBURN, Va. -- Washington Redskins cornerback David Amerson said he's feeling fine and will play against the Chicago Bears on Sunday, barring any setbacks. That's good news for a secondary that has another tough assignment this week. Amerson is listed as questionable on the injury report.
Amerson
With the Bears' diverse passing game, the Redskins need a healthy secondary to continue its recent solid play. Washington benefitted against Dallas from its ability to disguise coverages, partly because it used corner Josh Wilson in a variety of roles, from slot corner to strong safety. If Amerson had to miss, then the Redskins wouldn't be able to tap into their strength in the backfield right now, which is versatility.

Tight end Fred Davis (ankle), linebacker Brandon Jenkins (ankle), center Will Montgomery (knee), corner Jerome Murphy (ankle), nose tackle Chris Neild (calf) and tight end Logan Paulsen (knee) are probable.

For Chicago, tight end Martellus Bennett (knee) and corner Charles Tillman (knee) are questionable. Defensive tackle Stephen Paea (toe) is probable and his return would be welcomed by a struggling defensive front. Others listed as probable: linebacker James Anderson (back), safety Anthony Walters (hamstring) and safety Major Wright (knee).

Redskins injury report: Amerson limited

October, 17, 2013
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Amerson
ASHBURN, Va. -- Washington Redskins cornerback David Amerson was limited again in practice, but coach Mike Shanahan said he passed his tests and if that continues he’ll play against Chicago on Sunday.

Amerson suffered a concussion in Sunday’s 31-16 loss to the Dallas Cowboys. The Redskins could use him against the Bears and their big receivers -- 6-foot-4 Brandon Marshall and 6-foot-3 Alshon Jeffery -- this weekend.

Meanwhile, every other player was a full participation in practice, including nose tackle Chris Neild who was hurt in the first half of the Sept. 29 win at Oakland.

For Chicago, linebacker James Anderson (back), tight end Martellus Bennett (knee), defensive tackle Stephen Paea (toe) and cornerback Charles Tillman (knee) were limited in practice.

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