MLB announces postseason shares

Updated: November 21, 2013, 6:55 PM ET
ESPN.com news services

NEW YORK -- A full postseason share for the World Series champion Boston Red Sox was worth $307,323, down from a record $370,873 for the San Francisco Giants last year.

The players' pool dropped to $62.7 million from a record $65.4 million, Major League Baseball said Thursday.

Boston split $22.6 million, voting 58 full shares, partial shares equivalent to another 14.9 and 21 cash awards.

A full share on the NL champion St. Louis Cardinals was worth $228,300, down from $284,275 last year for AL champion Detroit.

To put in perspective the relative value of the bonus money, consider that for a player like Red Sox outfielder Daniel Nava, whose 2013 salary was $505,500, his World Series share amounts to a 60 percent bonus for an extra month of work.

But for an established star like World Series MVP David Ortiz, the "bonus" money in some ways represents a paycut. Ortiz earned $14.5 million in salary last season. Divided equally over 162 games, that's $89,506.17 per game. But a player's postseason share for the Red Sox, who played 16 playoff games (4 ALDS, 6 ALCS, 6 World Series), is worth only $19,207.67 per game -- less than a quarter of Ortiz's usual check.

The players' pool included 50 percent of the gate receipts from the two wild-card games, and 60 percent from the first three games of each division series and the first four games of each league championship series and the World Series.

Full shares were worth $129,278 for the Tigers, $108,037 for the Los Angeles Dodgers, $37,316 for the Oakland Athletics, $35,559 for the Pittsburgh Pirates, $35,280 for the Tampa Bay Rays, $34,012 for the Atlanta Braves, $15,285 for the Cincinnati Reds and $15,107 for the Cleveland Indians.

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

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