Hernandez judge sets 2nd hearing

Updated: July 9, 2014, 5:16 PM ET
ESPN.com news services

At a hearing Wednesday to determine whether the New England Patriots could be compelled to hand over Aaron Hernandez's medical records, Judge Raymond Veary said that scouting/combine reports on the former tight end are relevant, but whether the defense gets them won't be determined until another hearing on July 22.

Hernandez's attorney argued that the Patriots withheld Hernandez's psychological assessment as well as medical and scouting records, adding that his "state of mind" is critical to his defense.

"Everyone in this world knows your client's state of mind is an issue in this case," Judge Veary said.

The Patriots say they'll turn over hundreds of pages of medical and other records to lawyers for Hernandez but object to producing scouting reports and a psychological profile.

Patriots attorney Andrew Phelan said Wednesday the team has agreed to produce 317 pages of materials sought by Hernandez's defense attorneys. But Phelan says scouting reports are proprietary and irrelevant. He says the team has offered lawyers the option of reviewing the psychological assessment at its office.

Hernandez has pleaded not guilty to murder in the 2013 shooting death of Odin Lloyd, a semi-professional football player who was dating the sister of Hernandez's fiancée. Two of his associates have also been charged with murder. Hernandez has also pleaded not guilty in a second case in which he is charged with killing two men in Boston in 2012. He's being held without bail.

After Wednesday's hearing, Hernandez was transferred from the Bristol County House of Corrections to the Suffolk County Jail in Boston so that he could be closer to his lawyers.

Hernandez likely will be moved back to Bristol County when he goes on trial on the first of the three murder charges, for the killing of Lloyd.

ESPN's Michele Steele and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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