Survey: Vick most disliked in NFL

Updated: October 21, 2013, 2:59 PM ET
By Darren Rovell | ESPN.com

Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick is the most disliked player in the NFL, according to a survey of the public taken by E-Poll Market Research and released Monday by Forbes.com.

More than half of those asked in the survey of 1,100 people (53 percent) said they disliked Vick, even though the signal-caller hasn't taken any steps back after being released from prison in May 2009 following a 19-month sentence for his part in a dogfighting ring.

San Diego Chargers rookie linebacker Manti Te'o came in second, as 48 percent of respondents said they disliked the former Notre Dame star whose story of a deceased girlfriend turned out to be fake.

Te'o rose to the top of the list even though no evidence has been presented to suggest that he was in on the hoax.

A less surprising name, Detroit Lions defensive lineman Ndamukong Suh, came in as the third-most disliked player in the league. Suh has been fined more than $200,000 for his behavior on seven occasions in his three-plus seasons in the league.

Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, who has had off-the-field issues, is fourth. He was involved in a near-fatal motorcycle accident in 2006 and has faced two sexual assault allegations. Charges were not brought in either case, but he was suspended under the league's personal conduct policy in 2010 and settled a civil lawsuit in one of the cases in 2012.

Rounding out the top five is New York Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez, who lost the starting job to rookie Geno Smith and is out for the year after undergoing shoulder surgery.

Darren Rovell | email

ESPN.com Sports Business reporter

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