Corey Crawford: Pads not answer

Updated: March 22, 2013, 8:10 PM ET
By Scott Powers | ESPNChicago.com

CHICAGO -- Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford said Friday he doesn't think the recent proposal to shrink the goalie's equipment would make the NHL any more exciting.

"Honestly, I don't think it's really how many goals are scored that makes the game exciting," Crawford said after practice on Friday. "I think it's the speed and skill, the passing. I think as long as the game is fast, it'll be exciting. If we get 10-8 hockey games, doesn't mean it's going to be an exciting game. Just got to make sure the refs call the hooking and holding penalties and just let the speed of the game continue."

NHL general managers proposed at this week's meetings to reduce the height of the goalie pad above the knee and make knee pads more tightly conformed and less bulky in order to create more room in the 5-hole. The agenda item was tabled for now.

"It was a really healthy discussion," San Jose Sharks general manager Doug Wilson told ESPN.com's Pierre LeBrun. "We think it impacts the way the game is played. I think there's going to be some progress. It's something we've put off long enough."

Goalie equipment was readjusted in the 2005-06, 2008-09 and 2010-11 seasons.

Crawford thought goalies could still be protected if the equipment was made smaller, but he also reiterated his main point.

"It depends on how much they want to shrink it," Crawford said. "The thickness of the equipment can still be there, I think. Really, like I said, I don't think the size of the equipment really matters. Teams are going to find a way to score. I think if you have 8-7 games every night, sometimes it's not the solution.

"It's the speed of the game that makes it exciting, all the scoring chances. Who knows? We'll see what they do. If they do make a change, I don't see it being too drastic."

Scott Powers is a general reporter for ESPNChicago.com. He is an award-winning journalist and has been reporting on preps, colleges and pros for publications throughout the Midwest since 1997.