Commentary

Interactive Blackhawks report card

Check out our expert's grades, then share yours for each player

Updated: April 30, 2012, 3:15 PM ET
By Jesse Rogers | ESPNChicago.com

A season of promise still produced 101 points but a first-round postseason exit wasn't up to expectations.

Here are grades for your 2011-2012 Chicago Blackhawks with a chance for you to voice your approval or disapproval. Share your thoughts in the comments section. And keep in mind grades are based on expectations and salary compared to production with the six-game playoff series against the Phoenix Coyotes part of the equation.

Bryan Bickell, F

Rogers: His grade actually moves up due to a good playoff but he was just a body on the ice too many times in the regular season. His salary doesn't kill the Hawks, but his lack of production and physical play at times did. Grade: C-

Grade Bryan Bickell

  •  
    1%
  •  
    10%
  •  
    52%
  •  
    33%
  •  
    4%

(Total votes: 2,261)

Dave Bolland, F

Rogers: Bolland didn't put up career numbers, but he scored on the power play (seven) and shorthanded (three) and quietly had a good playoff series despite not getting a goal. He falls short of an "A" because he simply can and should produce more offense than 37 points. Grade: B

Grade Dave Bolland

  •  
    2%
  •  
    5%
  •  
    53%
  •  
    36%
  •  
    4%

(Total votes: 1,943)

Brandon Bollig, F

Rogers: Bollig did what was asked of him, dropping the gloves eight times in 18 regular season games and once in the playoffs while finally scoring his first career goal in Game 2 against Phoenix. Sure it would be nice to get more offense from him but being dropped into a playoff race as a rookie isn't easy. He did his job. Grade: B+

Grade Brandon Bollig

  •  
    3%
  •  
    16%
  •  
    47%
  •  
    27%
  •  
    7%

(Total votes: 2,171)

Andrew Brunette, F

Rogers: Even he admitted after the season the game might be trying to tell him something. At age 38 he had his worst year since 1998-99. Brunette slowed down his top six forward teammates. Although he showed some good hands around the goal, he wasn't the answer as the net presence on the power play the Hawks needed. Grade: D+

Grade Andrew Brunette

  •  
    0%
  •  
    2%
  •  
    14%
  •  
    41%
  •  
    43%

(Total votes: 2,148)

Daniel Carcillo, F

Rogers: The Hawks swear by him as evidenced by his re-signing mid-season while he was still recovering from major knee surgery. In 28 games he showed the grit and skill the team needs while frustrating fans with two suspensions, including on the play that ended his season. Grade: Inc.

Grade Daniel Carcillo

  •  
    18%
  •  
    25%
  •  
    7%
  •  
    20%
  •  
    30%

(Total votes: 2,076)

Michael Frolik, F

Rogers: His playoff series raises his grade from a "D" as he struggled most of the season, scoring five goals and earning a minus-10 rating, after signing a multi-year deal. He only scored five in the regular season but earned points on three of 12 postseason Hawks' scores while only dressing for four of six games. Grade: C-

Grade Michael Frolik

  •  
    44%
  •  
    16%
  •  
    2%
  •  
    9%
  •  
    29%

(Total votes: 2,168)

Jimmy Hayes, F

Rogers: He slowed some after bursting on the scene but mostly did what was asked of him, earning five goals and four assists in 31 games. He played well in the two playoff games he dressed, although his boarding penalty in Game 6 doomed any comeback chance for Chicago. Grade: B

Grade Jimmy Hayes

  •  
    9%
  •  
    51%
  •  
    35%
  •  
    4%
  •  
    1%

(Total votes: 2,089)

Marian Hossa, F

Rogers: Turning 33 didn't slow down Hossa. Only Raffi Torres did that. His 77 points led the team, and he stayed healthy until that fateful moment in Game 3. Hossa didn't kill penalties with the urgency needed, but he earned nine power-play goals for a unit that was much maligned. Grade: A-

Grade Marian Hossa

  •  
    74%
  •  
    23%
  •  
    2%
  •  
    0%
  •  
    1%

(Total votes: 2,222)

Patrick Kane, F

Rogers: For a player who talked about hoping to reach 100 points, he fell way short with just 66, the lowest total of his career. He played admirably at center for a couple of stretches but disappeared as the games became more important in the playoffs. Grade: C

Grade Patrick Kane

  •  
    4%
  •  
    6%
  •  
    38%
  •  
    38%
  •  
    14%

(Total votes: 2,294)

Marcus Kruger, F

Rogers: Remember, the grades reflect what was expected of him, and while he didn't wow anyone as the second-line center, he held his own in that role way ahead of schedule. Quenneville played him there for much of the season instead of Kane or even Dave Bolland. Why? He trusted him. Grade: B+

Grade Marcus Kruger

  •  
    8%
  •  
    50%
  •  
    32%
  •  
    7%
  •  
    3%

(Total votes: 2,030)

Jamal Mayers, F

Rogers: The quintessential teammate who played to the best to his abilities, he came to the aid of others, killed penalties and even tried his hand in front of the net on the power play. A little more offense could have bumped him up to an "A" though he did get benched in the playoffs. Grade: B+

Grade Jamal Mayers

  •  
    51%
  •  
    22%
  •  
    6%
  •  
    2%
  •  
    19%

(Total votes: 2,023)

Brendan Morrison, F

Rogers: His grade gets bumped up a little for having a decent playoff series, which came out of nowhere, but he didn't have much left in the tank after the Hawks acquired him mid-season. Grade: D+

Grade Brendan Morrison

  •  
    0%
  •  
    1%
  •  
    11%
  •  
    35%
  •  
    53%

(Total votes: 2,025)

Patrick Sharp, F

Rogers: He was an "A" player during the regular season but had a quiet playoff series. Still, his 33 goals and 36 assists were more than admirable considering he had an emergency appendectomy, missing training camp and then broke a bone in his wrist, causing him to miss nine games in the regular season. Arguably the Hawks' most valuable player. Grade: A-

Grade Patrick Sharp

  •  
    67%
  •  
    28%
  •  
    3%
  •  
    0%
  •  
    2%

(Total votes: 2,114)

Andrew Shaw, F

Rogers: What more can be said about the best story of 2011-2012? A fifth-round pick last June, he surprised the NHL with 12 goals and 11 assists in 37 games and did it with a tenacity others could learn from. Yes, his high hit on goalie Mike Smith in the playoffs wasn't the brightest play, but it was the only down moment in a great rookie campaign. Grade: A

Grade Andrew Shaw

  •  
    16%
  •  
    1%
  •  
    0%
  •  
    1%
  •  
    82%

(Total votes: 2,124)

Viktor Stalberg, F

Rogers: Considering his salary ($850,000) and what was expected (fourth line?) it really was a breakout season for the 26-year-old. Sure, he disappeared against some of the tougher defensive opponents -- and there was that four-penalty game in the postseason -- but he scored 22 goals and had 21 assists without any power-play time. Grade: A-

Grade Viktor Stalberg

  •  
    48%
  •  
    41%
  •  
    8%
  •  
    1%
  •  
    2%

(Total votes: 2,093)

Jonathan Toews, F

Rogers: He's downgraded from a straight "A" for his admittedly bad decision to play through concussion symptoms which probably contributed to a long absence from the lineup. But as usual, when he was in there, he was dynamite and probably would have put up career numbers if not for the injury. Grade: A-

Grade Jonathan Toews

  •  
    85%
  •  
    14%
  •  
    1%
  •  
    0%
  •  
    0%

(Total votes: 2,143)

Niklas Hjalmarsson, D

Rogers: Yes, he was above average, but his game hasn't gone to that next level. His 15 points is about what he's going to be on offense. Although he was plus-9, he was dropped to the third pair after the arrival of Johnny Oduya, plus he was part of an awful penalty kill. Decent, but not great. Grade: B-

Grade Niklas Hjalmarsson

  •  
    30%
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    46%
  •  
    15%
  •  
    5%
  •  
    4%

(Total votes: 2,084)

Duncan Keith, D

Rogers: One of the hardest to grade because when he was out of the lineup due to injury or suspension, he was missed. But based on expectations -- after a long summer of rest -- he's still not back to Norris Trophy form. His 2.5 percent shooting percentage speaks volumes of his shot/offense, but he still earned 40 points due to 36 assists, a decent number. Grade: C+

Grade Duncan Keith

  •  
    5%
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    37%
  •  
    43%
  •  
    12%
  •  
    3%

(Total votes: 2,109)

Nick Leddy, D

Rogers: He played all 82 games and started out on fire, but at the end of the day a defenseman has to kill plays, and he didn't do enough of that. His 37 assists were great, but he seemed to shoot less and less until a few chances and a goal in the playoffs. He was minus-12, and that alone prevents him from receiving a higher grade though he is only 21. Grade: C-

Grade Nick Leddy

  •  
    2%
  •  
    25%
  •  
    43%
  •  
    23%
  •  
    7%

(Total votes: 1,994)

Sami Lepisto, D

Rogers: He could receive an incomplete due to playing in just 26 regular season games but obviously -- right or wrong -- Joel Quenneville didn't trust him enough to get him more ice time. He could return as a seventh D-man. Grade: C+

Grade Sami Lepisto

  •  
    1%
  •  
    10%
  •  
    37%
  •  
    39%
  •  
    13%

(Total votes: 1,901)

Steve Montador, D

Rogers: Again, based on salary and expectations, he didn't live up to it -- partly because of a late-season concussion. But he wasn't trustworthy on defense and had a very short stretch of helping on offense, something Stan Bowman said he had more potential for. Grade: C-

Grade Steve Montador

  •  
    45%
  •  
    17%
  •  
    1%
  •  
    5%
  •  
    32%

(Total votes: 1,915)

Sean O'Donnell, D

Rogers: O'Donnell and Leddy can be viewed in a similar manner: What can you expect from a 21-year-old and 40-year-old defenseman? The difference is O'Donnell has the experience, but it didn't pay off. He was minus-6 in the regular season and on the ice for two crucial overtime goals in the postseason -- in limited minutes. Grade: D+

Grade Sean O'Donnell

  •  
    0%
  •  
    1%
  •  
    14%
  •  
    44%
  •  
    41%

(Total votes: 1,888)

Johnny Oduya, D

Rogers: He's downgraded a little for a poor playoff series but certainly helped settle things down on defense after being acquired on trade deadline day. He fit in as a puck-moving defenseman but didn't help the special teams as much as they needed it. Grade: B

Grade Johnny Oduya

  •  
    5%
  •  
    3%
  •  
    14%
  •  
    53%
  •  
    25%

(Total votes: 1,958)

Dylan Olsen, D

Rogers: He did nothing to embarrass himself nor did he light the world on fire in his first 28-game stint in the NHL. He garnered one point and was minus-1 but only played in one playoff game. An incomplete wasn't out of the question for him. Grade: B

Grade Dylan Olsen

  •  
    40%
  •  
    5%
  •  
    3%
  •  
    4%
  •  
    48%

(Total votes: 1,855)

Brent Seabrook, D

Rogers: His best play came at the most important time of the season -- the stretch run. He had nine goals including three game-winners. Although he was a little quiet in the playoffs he was still plus-1 with three points. Someone has to get a straight "A," right? Grade: A

Grade Brent Seabrook

  •  
    83%
  •  
    14%
  •  
    2%
  •  
    1%
  •  
    0%

(Total votes: 2,039)

Corey Crawford, G

Rogers: The Hawks still earned 101 points and fairly easily made the playoffs with Crawford mostly the No. 1 goaltender, but that's where the positives end. His numbers were near the bottom of the NHL, and the two soft goals given up in overtime in the postseason doomed the Hawks' chances to move on. Grade: C-

Grade Corey Crawford

  •  
    1%
  •  
    9%
  •  
    35%
  •  
    38%
  •  
    17%

(Total votes: 2,212)

Ray Emery, G

Rogers: Emery was the consummate backup, winning a handful of games and keeping his team in most that he even lost. He's probably no longer capable of shouldering the load as the No. 1 goalie, but he handled the No. 2 position just fine. Grade: B

Grade Ray Emery

  •  
    37%
  •  
    7%
  •  
    4%
  •  
    5%
  •  
    47%

(Total votes: 2,054)

Joel Quenneville, Coach

Rogers: The fall from the top of the standings along with a first-round exit in the playoffs plummeted his grade, but it's how they lost that hurt as well. Special teams never improved considerably enough nor did he push the right buttons to stop an NHL long nine-game losing streak. Those are coaching issues. He righted the ship, but it was just an average year for the staff. Grade: C

Grade Joel Quenneville

  •  
    29%
  •  
    40%
  •  
    20%
  •  
    6%
  •  
    5%

(Total votes: 879)

Stan Bowman, GM

Rogers: The addition of Oduya helped, but not enough to offset down years from O'Donnell, Brunette, Morrison and Montador. And even Mayers was benched in the playoffs. Bowman didn't hit one home run last offseason -- and re-signed Frolik for good money -- and wasn't able to acquire a second-line center. But remember, he did oversee a draft which just produced Andrew Shaw and Brandon Saad. The former was a big contributor. Shaw and Oduya saved Bowman from an even worse grade. Grade: D+

Grade Stan Bowman

  •  
    42%
  •  
    1%
  •  
    4%
  •  
    17%
  •  
    36%

(Total votes: 900)


Jesse Rogers | email

Chicago Cubs beat reporter
Jesse joined ESPN Chicago in September 2009 and covers the Chicago Cubs for ESPNChicago.com and ESPN Radio 1000.

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