20 things to know about 2016 class

Updated: July 8, 2014, 2:57 PM ET
By Gerry Hamilton | ESPN RecruitingNation

The ESPN Junior 300 for the Class of 2016 debuts today. Here are 20 things to know about the group:

20. Texas A&M offensive tackle commit Patrick Hudson is one of the strongest prospects in the class. At a powerlifting meet, the 6-foot-5, 330-pound Hudson, who ranks No. 20 in the 2016 class, bench-pressed 425 pounds and squatted 625 pounds. He's 16 years old.

[+] EnlargeDeontay Anderson
William Wilkerson/ESPNNo. 7 prospect Deontay Anderson was named the MVP of the defensive backs at the Houston Nike Football Training Camp earlier this year.
19. There are 19 prospects from Louisiana, the state that produces the most NFL players relative to its size. Defensive tackle Edwin Alexander is the highest ranked, at No. 10. Louisiana has produced two No. 1 recruits since 2006: running backs Joe McKnight in 2007 and Leonard Fournette in 2014.

18. St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, has two prospects ranked in the ESPN Junior 300: No. 23 Nick Bosa, a defensive end, and No. 34 Sam Bruce, a wide receiver. The school has now produced 18 ESPN 300 recruits since we began our rankings. There were four former St. Thomas Aquinas players taken in the 2014 NFL draft.

17. There are 40 prospects from Florida in the initial 2016 rankings, the most of any state. That number is down from 51 prospects from the Sunshine State in the 2015 ESPN 300. Texas is second with 39.

16. Eric Monroe is one of three Texas safeties in the top 26. The North Shore coaching staff has tagged Monroe as the best defensive back prospect from the talent-rich Houston area school since Chykie Brown, who plays for the Baltimore Ravens.

15. Speedster receiver Devin Duvernay checks in at No. 15 in the rankings. He is a cousin of five-star prospect and No. 1-ranked quarterback Kyler Murray. They attend high schools less than 20 miles apart.

14. Running back Tavien Feaster, who is ranked No. 14, is in position to claim the fastest-man tag in the ESPN Junior 300. He won the South Carolina 100- and 200-meter titles in May with times of 10.59 and 21.29, respectively.

13. There are 29 prospects in the ESPN Junior 300 who have committed to schools. That number will likely be up to more than 150 a year from now. More than 165 prospects in the 2015 ESPN 300 have already committed to a school.

12. No. 24 recruit Dwayne Haskins is the first cousin of five-star cornerback Kevin Toliver II. Haskins went from having five offers prior to the Elite 11 regionals in April in Washington, D.C., to having more than 20 at the end of May.

11. Receiver Dredrick Snelson's ranking -- No. 11 -- means that for a third straight class American Heritage High School has a top-20 prospect. Quarterback Torrance Gibson is No. 12 in 2015, and Georgia running back Sony Michel was No. 19 in 2014. American Heritage won the Florida Class 5A state title in 2013.

[+] EnlargeMalik Henry
Tom Hauck for Student SportsTop-ranked quarterback Malik Henry is receiving interest from USC, Tennessee, Notre Dame, Florida State and Michigan, among other schools.
10. There are 25 quarterbacks in the ESPN Junior 300, the most since 33 in the 2013 ESPN 300. Not known as a quarterback-producing state, Florida leads the way with four QBs in the Class of 2016 rankings.

9. There are nine prospects from Texas in the top 50 in these rankings. That is the most top-50 prospects from Texas since 2006, the first year ESPN ranked prospects.

8. No. 137 prospect Elijah Holyfield is the son of former heavyweight boxing champion Evander Holyfield. Elijah Holyfield is a running back at Woodward Academy in Atlanta. He has offers from Ohio State, Michigan, Tennessee and Wisconsin, among others.

7. Deontay Anderson is the highest-ranked safety since Landon Collins was No. 6 in 2012. Anderson, a 2016 Under Armour All-America Game selection, is the sixth safety since 2006 to be ranked No. 7 or better.

6. Nick Bosa is the younger brother of Ohio State defensive tackle Joey Bosa, who was ranked No. 56 in the 2013 class. No. 153 prospect Benjamin LeMay, a tailback, is the younger brother of quarterback Christian LeMay, who was ranked No. 100 in the 2011 class. The highest-ranked brothers in the 10 years ESPN has ranked prospects are No. 6 Arthur Brown (Miami) in 2008 and No. 8 Bryce Brown (Tennessee) in 2009.

5. Kareem Walker is the eighth running back to be ranked in the top five in the 10 years ESPN has ranked prospects. Walker is the fourth prospect from New Jersey to be ranked in the top five. He joins Jabrill Peppers (No. 2 in 2014), Will Hill (No. 3 in 2008) and Myron Rolle (No. 1 in 2006).

4. Quarterback Jacob Eason is the son of former Notre Dame wide receiver Tony Eason. Jacob Eason, who is ranked No. 4, and No. 2 recruit Malik Henry make this the first time in the 10 years ESPN has been ranking prospects that two quarterbacks are in the top 10.

3. Shavar Manuel is the second prospect from Tampa, Florida, to be ranked in the top three. He joins Florida freshman All-American Vernon Hargreaves III, who was No. 3 in the 2013 class. Manuel is also the seventh defensive end to be ranked in the top three.

2. Malik Henry is the highest-ranked quarterback since Matt Barkley was ranked No. 1 in 2009. Like Barkley, Henry is from southern California. Henry is also the third signal-caller from California to be ranked in the top 10, joining Barkley and Jimmy Clausen (No. 9 in 2007).

1. Greg Little is the first offensive tackle to be ranked No. 1 in the 10 years ESPN has ranked prospects. Little is the sixth offensive tackle to be ranked in the top five, following Andre Smith (No. 4 in 2006), Cyrus Kouandjio (No. 3 in 2011), Laremy Tunsil (No. 5 in 2013), Cameron Robinson (No. 3 in 2014) and Martez Ivey (No. 2 in 2015). Allen joins Mario Edwards (2012) as Texans ranked No. 1.

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