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Time for a new idea?

SPECIAL TO ESPN.COM

Shock, shock, shock! The bulletin came in that Kansas State's Michael Beasley decided to go to the NBA.

Come on now, is that really a surprise? Give me a break! The NCAA manual talks about the term student-athlete. Is this healthy to have the one-and-done routine?

Look at some of the guys who have played one season in college and then gone to the pros. How many have them have gone back to school to work on a degree? Do they live up to that term student-athlete?

It is time for the decision-makers think about altering this. You have great players tease us for one season on the college level and then it is bye-bye.

I feel that kids like Beasley, Derrick Rose, OJ Mayo and the true upper-echelon players can go to the NBA after one season. It is like LeBron James and Kobe Bryant; those guys deserved to go to the NBA right away.

There is an NBA advisory committee that tells players where they will likely go in the draft. Let this group or another select committee pick the top five early-entry candidates and let them go to the pros after their freshman season.

The others should have to spend three years in college to give some stability to the college game. These kids who are not ready for the NBA can grow up and mature as individuals. They should prepare for life because they are not necessarily good enough to play long-term. They bounce around from D-League to overseas to a nomadic existence.

A lot of kids have hopes and dreams but are not ready.

I guess the people in Manhattan, Kansas are glad they had Beasley for one year because that is better than not having him at all. At least he led the Wildcats to the NCAA tournament for the first time since 1996.

Dick Vitale coached the Pistons and the University of Detroit before broadcasting ESPN's first college basketball game in December 1979. Send him a question for possible use on ESPNEWS.

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