Discussion

Floridians have the market cornered

Originally Published: December 17, 2009
By Billy Tucker | Scouts Inc.
Cornerback could be the most difficult position to project to the college level. With so many different schemes these days and the influx of so much Cover 2 shell, having that elite cover corner is not always the main concern. Scheme is now dictating what coaches want more than ever at the college level; a well-rounded, scheme-versatile corner is often more coveted. This class has a ton of corners who fit into that mold.

Cornerbacks can be difficult to evaluate because oftentimes many teams at the high school level do not have the personnel to match up and run a ton of true zero or Cover 1 man coverage. It can be a struggle to get a feel for a player's true cover skills. Cover 3, Cover 2, quarters, quarter-quarter-half and versions of combo coverage are more the norm in high school. Also, this position is one with a ton of transplants at the next level. Prospects who were undersized running backs, wide receivers or quarterbacks in high school often make the transition to cornerback in college. Aside from quarterbacks, corners require the most mental toughness of any player on the field. A short memory is crucial.

This year's class of corners is an intriguing group to evaluate. While very talented in regard to skill and natural ability, it lacks an abundance of true cover corners. It's loaded with athletic, savvy and scheme-versatile prospects who project well on the perimeter, but some of these talents don't have much experience or a complete skill set. Even its top overall player, five-star Lamarcus Joyner (Miami/Saint Thomas Aquinas), played more safety in high school. Still, at only 5-foot-8, we project he will slide his great speed and hips out to the perimeter when he arrives at Florida State. Joyner is an extremely athletic, two-way player, as is Alabama commit DeMarcus Milliner (Millbrook, Ala./Stanhope Elmore) and Florida pledge Joshua Shaw (Palmdale, Calif.), ESPN's No. 2 and 3 rated corners, respectively. In fact, most of the top corners in this class are athletic enough to get recruited at another position in college.

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