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Sanders steals the show in Day 3

SMU wideout shines and sends stock soaring, while others struggle in Day 3 practice

Originally Published: January 20, 2010
By Todd McShay | Scouts Inc.
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Wednesday's practice was again in full pads as the teams prepare for Saturday's East-West Shrine Game (ESPN2, 3 p.m. ET). Here's a quick look at players who had good days, and players who had bad days. And remember, this is just one day out of the whole week, so one day does not make or break a prospect.

East Team: Good Days

FB Richard Dickson, LSU
At 6-foot-3, 244 pounds, Dickson doesn't have the prototypical size to move to tight end, but he could do a lot in an H-back/FB role. He has good, not great, point of attack skills so while he doesn't explode through a hole, he shows good technique, keeps his legs under him and keeps them moving and shows good balance. He would be a solid blocker but where he'd help a team is in the passing game. He has soft, natural hands and caught the ball away from his frame during warm-ups, drills and team spots. For example, he caught a screen and showed some elusiveness by making a guy miss for a 15-yard gain. While Dickson doesn't excel in any one area, but he has enough versatility to contribute in a number of ways. He is worthy of late-round consideration.

DB Barry Church, Toledo
Church spent a lot of time today in deep middle zone coverage and that centerfielder role played to his strengths. We know his weaknesses, that he has stiffness in his hips which creates problems any time he has to change directions or track the ball or receiver, but today showed the things he does really well like reading the QB's eyes, reading his keys and protecting himself. He was reacting quicker than most of the other players in coverage on the East defense. He might not run a great 40 time, but for a 215-pound safety, he closes pretty well. It's not great closing speed, but he's quick enough to make up some ground when the ball is in the air. Another thing he does well is he fills hard in run support, but he's under control when he does it. He takes good angles and is breaking down as he approaches the running back rather than just flying in there, throwing a shoulder and lunging, which a lot of college safeties tend to do. He's among the top three DBs in this game.

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