Commentary

Roundball chatter

Updated: June 30, 2014, 3:44 PM ET
By Dick Vitale | ESPN.com

Each week, I write about the sport I love, college basketball:

• While the one-and-done players dominated early in the NBA draft Thursday, there were plenty of stars who did not hear their names called that evening. Guys like C.J. Fair of Syracuse, Sean Kilpatrick of Cincinnati, Patric Young of Florida and Aaron Craft of Ohio State became free agents, looking to hook up with summer league teams. There were also a number of underclassmen left in the cold, like Arizona State's Jahii Carson and James Michael McAdoo of North Carolina.

• Congratulations to Cincinnati coach Mick Cronin, who received a new seven-year deal. Cronin has led the Bearcats to four straight NCAA tournament bids.

• There was good news for UCLA. Zach LaVine, Jordan Adams and Kyle Anderson all went in the first round of the draft. The previous and only time the Bruins had a trio of first-round choices was 1979, when David Greenwood, Roy Hamilton (I took him with the Pistons) and Brad Holland were tabbed. The Bruins got more positive news when former Colorado State guard Jon Octeus, who averaged more than 13 PPG last season, transferred into Westwood. He is eligible immediately as a fifth-year senior.

• The pairings have been announced for the Coaches vs. Cancer event in November at Barclay's Center in Brooklyn. Duke will meet Temple, and UNLV will face Stanford. The winners will meet in the title game Nov. 22.

• I was really touched by the NABC (National Association of Basketball Coaches), which put me in their Court of Honor. I attended a dinner in New York City last week and it was really special. Thanks to Roy Williams, Mike Krzyzewski and all of the coaches who helped make it such a memorable night for me.

Dick Vitale

College Basketball analyst
Dick Vitale, college basketball's top analyst and ambassador, joined ESPN during the 1979-80 season. His thorough knowledge of the game is brought forth in an enthusiastic, passionate style. Vitale also contributes columns to ESPN.com.

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