Commentary

What's taking the NCAA so long?

Updated: October 19, 2012, 5:39 PM ET
By Dick Vitale

Shabazz Muhammad, Kyle AndersonAP Photo/Charles Rex ArbogastShabazz Muhammad, right, celebrates with Kyle Anderson after winning the slam dunk contest at the McDonald's All-American slam dunk contest. Both players await a ruling on their eligibility this season.

I think it is ludicrous the way the NCAA handles some of its decisions concerning eligibility.

Look at what has gone on at UCLA. Shabazz Muhammad and Kyle Anderson have been waiting for an answer for months regarding their eligibility for the upcoming season. Think about all the people that have been hanging on this decision.

Here we are in October, less than a month before the Bruins open against Indiana State. Coach Ben Howland has to wonder why it has taken this long. I find it mind-boggling that the NCAA cannot determine the status of an athlete after four or five months. I know it needs some time to investigate the situation, but what is being done here?

It appears the NCAA will declare Nerlens Noel eligible at Kentucky. Big Blue Nation is certainly happy.

About the UCLA case, what is going on? Do we need the CIA or FBI to get involved? Maybe it should take this long. Maybe it is just me. I can only imagine how frustrating it is for the people out at Westwood.

What goes on with the decision-making process just blows my mind. The schools deserve better. The youngsters deserve better. Everyone in the process deserves better. Taking this long also hurts the image of the NCAA. It looks like procrastination right now. I have been waiting to see the answer about this for months.

Do you think UCLA will be a different team with Muhammad and Anderson on the court? The Bruins would be top 10-15 with them; it is a different story without them.

While we are talking about the NCAA, I think it is time to consider changing the transfer rule.

School A has a player who wants to leave. If the coach feels the player would be better off transferring to a different school and approves it, the young man should be eligible immediately. If the school does not agree, then the young man must sit out one season. I feel that would be more fair for the student-athlete and end some of the controversy over transfers.

Coaches move to new jobs, some leaving despite being under contract. Oftentimes we see schools paying for buyouts of contracts. They don't have to sit out a year. Meanwhile, players left behind cannot transfer without being penalized and are forced to sit out one season under the current rules.

Just a few thoughts as we get ready for the season to begin, baby!

Dick Vitale

College Basketball analyst
Dick Vitale, college basketball's top analyst and ambassador, joined ESPN during the 1979-80 season. His thorough knowledge of the game is brought forth in an enthusiastic, passionate style. Vitale also contributes columns to ESPN.com.