Miguel Tejada linked to Biogenesis

Updated: August 20, 2013, 8:27 AM ET
By Pedro Gomez | ESPN

Kansas City Royals infielder Miguel Tejada, suspended for 105 games last week because of positive tests for amphetamine use this season, was also implicated in the Biogenesis investigation, sources familiar with the case confirmed to ESPN.

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Major League Baseball had the choice of going after the 2002 American League MVP for the Biogenesis case, as the league did 13 other players earlier this month, or for the amphetamine case. MLB chose to suspend Tejada after he tested positive for a third time in his career for amphetamines.

Tejada, according to a source familiar with the case, was given the choice of either accepting the 105-game suspension for amphetamine use or facing additional punishment for his Biogenesis connection. Tejada was allegedly a customer of Tony Bosch's shuttered clinic, which is at the heart of baseball's recent rash of suspensions. Bosch supplied evidence that Tejada had been a Biogenesis customer.

Tejada said he had a therapeutic use exemption for the drug Adderall. The MLB Players Association reportedly argued that Tejada's TUE had expired in April and that he should have been allowed to continue to play while applying for an extension. MLB disagreed and Tejada did not fight the suspension.

"I apologize to my teammates, the Royals organization and to the Kansas City fans," Tejada said in a statement the day he was suspended. "I have a medical condition that requires medication to treat. I took that medication while re-applying for a Therapeutic Use Exemption. Under the requirements of the Joint Drug Program, I made a mistake in doing so."

A first positive test for amphetamines requires counseling, a second is a 25-game suspension and a third is 80 games. After two positive tests this season, preceded by another positive test, MLB suspended Tejada for 105 games.

Tejada, 39, may have difficulty returning to a big league roster next season, though he insists he does not plan to retire. He would be forced to sit out the first 64 games of next season. He is a free agent after this season.

Tejada is the third former MVP to be suspended for failing to abide to the Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program, joining Alex Rodriguez and Ryan Braun. Tejada was hitting .288 with three home runs and 20 RBIs in 53 games for the Royals this season.

ESPN's Pedro Gomez covered the Oakland A's home and away nearly every day from 1992-97 for the San Jose Mercury News and Sacramento Bee and then became the national baseball writer and later a general columnist at the Arizona Republic before becoming an ESPN bureau reporter in 2003.

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