Donald Driver, Tee Martin make All-Golf Team

Sat, Jan 29
9:56
AM ET

Get out the snow-blower, hop on a plane or move to California or Florida or Hawaii. Those are your choices if you want to take your swings this time of the year. Or you can enjoy the game vicariously -- and without spoiling a walk -- by reading Page 2's All-Golf Team.

Wally Bunker: The right-hander generally stayed out of trouble in a nine-year MLB career highlighted by a six-hit shutout of the Dodgers for the Orioles in the third game of the 1966 World Series. He finished in the Top 10 in fewest walks and hits per nine innings in two seasons in addition to the championship campaign.

Donald Driver: This Driver is the definition of a successful long shot. A seventh-round pick in the 1999 NFL Draft, he has been the Green Bay Packers' franchise leader in receptions since the middle of the 2009 season.

Bill Eagle: On paper, the notion of an Eagle playing for the team based in the nation's capital seemed perfect, but very little about the 1898 Washington Senators was even passable. The team ran through four managers while going 51-101, which suggests that its performance is best described as subpar rather than 2-under-par, the score accompanying an eagle on a hole in golf.

Gerald Irons: The linebacker for the Raiders and Browns seldom missed the starter's call. He was in the lineup for all 56 regular-season games from 1972-76.

Tee Martin: Peyton Manning's the most beloved quarterback in Tennessee Vols history, but Tamaurice Nigel Martin knew a thing or two about proper setup and execution. Martin was the offensive leader of the Vols' 1998 national championship team, and in one game, he completed 23 passes in that game, and, added to one from the previous game, his final 24 passes to set an NCAA record.

Eric Wedge: The 2007 American League Manager of the Year is the latest guy to take the Mariners' helm. While you can't really call him "pitching wedge," he does know something about that aspect of the game, having been a Major League catcher for the Red Sox and Rockies. Off the field, Wedge reports that his 2-year-old son, Cash, has been known to pick up a golf club.