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Friday, December 8, 2006
Updated: December 9, 2:01 PM ET
UAB's Brown accepts job at Tennessee Tech

By Mark Schlabach
ESPN.com

Now there are two Division I-A schools in Alabama in the market for a new football coach.

UAB coach Watson Brown, who was the Blazers' football coach for 12 seasons and also worked a dual role as the school's athletics director for three years, resigned Friday to accept the head coaching job at Division I-AA Tennessee Tech.

Brown informed UAB officials of his decision on Friday. The Golden Eagles are expected to make the announcement of his hiring during a basketball game Saturday.

Brown, the brother of Texas football coach Mack Brown, is a native of Cookeville, Tenn., where Tennessee Tech is located. He previously coached at two other Tennessee colleges -- Division I-AA Austin Peay State and Vanderbilt -- and was elected into the state's sports hall of fame two years ago.

Brown replaces Golden Eagles interim coach Doug Malone, who led Tennessee Tech to a 4-7 record (4-4 in Ohio Valley Conference) this season. Malone took over for longtime coach Mike Henningan, who resigned in July for health reasons.

Brown had a 62-75 record at UAB, including a disappointing 3-9 mark (2-6 in Conference USA) this season. His overall coaching record is 94-152-1 in 22 seasons.

Last week, it seemed Brown would return to his post as UAB's athletics director, and offensive coordinator Pat Sullivan would replace him as football coach.

But after all parties agreed, the deal was nixed by the school's board of trustees. Sullivan, the 1971 Heisman Trophy winner, last week was named coach at Division I-AA Samford University in Homewood, Ala.

UAB interim athletics director Richard Margison is expected to begin a search for Brown's replacement immediately.

UAB is governed by the University of Alabama board of Trustees, which also oversees the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. The Crimson Tide is seeking a replacement for fired football coach Mike Shula.

Mark Schlabach covers college football and men's college basketball for ESPN.com.