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Monday, September 28, 2009
Updated: September 29, 1:08 PM ET
Report: Raiders aide details skirmish

ESPN.com news services

Oakland Raiders assistant coach Randy Hanson told investigators that he was struck by head coach Tom Cable and suffered a broken jaw, his lawyer told NFL Network on Monday.

A few weeks after the Aug. 5 incident, Cable said "nothing happened."

"When all the facts come out, everything will be fine," he said.

Hanson's lawyer, John McGuinn, disputed that, calling the skirmish a "textbook case of felony assault," according to NFL Network.

McGuinn said that Hanson is still being paid by the Raiders but has been told to stay away from the team's facility. That hasn't stopped players from soliciting his advice.

"Before their last preseason game several players contacted Randy and said they needed help. They said, 'If we get you a computer can you help us come up with some tips?' Randy worked with them and they played really well in that game, particularly the defensive backs," McGuinn said, according to NFL Network.

"So the guys asked him to do it again and he met with them before the Monday night game in San Diego [Sept. 14], and the defensive backs played well again. [Owner] Al Davis doesn't know [Hanson has] been providing detailed coaching for these guys, and Randy has not gotten any credit for it."

Hanson was interviewed for approximately 90 minutes by Napa Valley (Calif.) Detective Mike Walund and turned over medical records which detailed his broken jaw, McGuinn said.

"Randy answered the detective's questions, but we have no idea whether charges will be coming," McGuinn said, according to NFL Network. "That will strictly be determined by the police and the DA's office. We have no input. He just answered questions."

McGuinn said that neither he nor Hanson has been contacted by the league, which has indicated it is looking into the incident.

Napa police told NFL Network: "It's an open investigation and we're making no comment at all."

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.