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Sunday, April 18, 2010
Scully marks 60 years with Dodgers

By Tony Jackson
ESPNLosAngeles.com

LOS ANGELES -- Los Angeles Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully doesn't spend much time dwelling on his own milestones and accomplishments. For one thing, there are too many of them. For another, there are plenty of people out there making sure all Scully's myriad achievements are properly recognized.

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It was in that spirit that Scully showed up at Dodger Stadium on Sunday pretty much the way he always does, fully prepared to broadcast another baseball game. So when someone walked into his booth about three hours before game time to congratulate him on the 60th anniversary of the first regular-season game he ever called for the Dodgers, it shouldn't have been all that surprising that Scully said he was caught by surprise.

"I had no idea,'' Scully said.

He also remembers no details from his first game, on April 18, 1950, who the Dodgers were playing or where the game was. For the record, the defending National League champion Brooklyn Dodgers opened their season that day with a 9-1 loss to the Philadelphia Phillies at Connie Mack Stadium. The starting pitchers were Don Newcombe and Robin Roberts.

"I was probably scared to death, seriously,'' he said. "At least I had done a lot of exhibition games for a month. In those days, I would only do the third inning and the seventh inning on radio.''

Scully was the rookie back then, working with the legendary Red Barber and Connie Desmond. Barber did part of the game on television, and the three of them would rotate in and out of the radio booth. He said it doesn't seem like it has been 60 years.

"It really doesn't,'' he said. "It's a young man's game, but I really do it has to make you, I don't want to say stay younger exactly, but it is still fun. It's not a grind. It's not like you come out here thinking, 'OK, I can't wait until the day is over.'''

Tony Jackson covers the Dodgers for ESPNLosAngeles.com.