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Wednesday, January 12, 2011
Source: Dolphins talk to Brian Daboll

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Cleveland offensive coordinator Brian Daboll was in Miami on Wednesday to interview with the Dolphins for either their offensive coordinator or quarterback coach job, a league source told ESPN NFL Insider Adam Schefter.

Daboll already knows the AFC East division well, having been a coach in New England from 2000-2006 and with the New York Jets from 2007-2008.

Daboll was hired as Cleveland's offensive coordinator after the Browns hired former Jets coach Eric Mangini. Daboll is still under contract with Cleveland despite Mangini's firing, but is unlikely to return to the Browns once a new coach is hired.

League sources told Schefter on Wednesday that Rams offensive coordinator Pat Shurmur is the leading candidate in Cleveland.

The Browns were the only AFC team to score less than the Dolphins last season.

Miami's offense struggled last season despite an offseason trade for Pro Bowl wide receiver Brandon Marshall. Third-year quarterback Chad Henne threw 15 TDs and 19 interceptions and was benched for Chad Pennington at one point.

Head coach Tony Sparano and offensive coordinator Dan Henning took much of the blame and Sparano was at the center of a messy situation after the season as the Dolphins talked with other coaching candidates while Sparano was still under contract.

Sparano eventually received a two-year extension, but Henning will not return.

At the news conference announcing Sparano's extension, Dolphins owner Stephen Ross said the focus for this season would be squarely on Miam's offense.

"The emphasis is going to be on offense -- an exciting offense, a more aggressive offense, creative," Ross said. "I will deliver a winner. That is my commitment."

Cowboys tight ends coach John Garrett, older brother of new Dallas head coach Jason Garrett, also interviewed for the Dolphins' offensive coordinator position Wednesday.

Information from ESPNDallas.com's Todd Archer and The Associated Press contributed to this report.