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Saturday, January 7, 2012
Gary Forbes makes Page 2's All-Magazine Team


Until somebody names his or her kid "ESPN The Magazine Green" and that individual becomes a sports star, we can't be guilty of self-promotion in compiling this, the All-Magazine Team. Check back in 20 years. For now, behold all the figures whose names are fit to print on a reasonably regular basis.

Essence Carson: The former Rutgers basketball player helped the Scarlet Knights to the Final Four while raising the eyebrows of style expert Don Imus back in 2007. The periodical with which she shares a name has a circulation of over 1 million, which is about 1 million more customers than Imus had for a brief spell after his unprovoked diatribe against the Knights. Carson, on the other hand, parlayed her college playing days into a WNBA career.

Gary Forbes: Although not at the income level of others in the high-finance magazine, Forbes is in the NBA these days, and nobody can reasonably say he doesn't deserve it. Among the teams for which he did time en route to the big time: the Tulsa 66ers (D-League), Sioux Falls Skyforce (D-League), Talk 'N Text Tropang Texters (Philippines) and Trotamundos de Carabobo (Venezuela.)

Chad Fortune: If putting together his career highlights, the Louisville tight end might have to call it the Fortune 692: one spot for every yard he gained in 65 receptions over two seasons for the Cardinals. Chad didn't do much time in the NFL, but went on to make his fortune in WWE and Monster Trucks -- this season, he'll drive the Captain America during the 2012 Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam Season.

Marie-Claire Restoux: Her event, the Half-Lightweight, doesn't sound as if it has any serious competitors. Some advice: Don't go around dissing it. This is judo we're talking about, and Restoux won gold in Atlanta for her native France in 1996. And that, by the way, sounds like it might make decent copy for Marie Claire, a women's magazine in the Hearst empire. Alas, an online search for Restoux came up a less than half-lightweight volume of hits.

Enos "Country" Slaughter: The pride of Roxboro, N.C., made the All-Star Game in 11 straight seasons, two of which featured fewer than 13 homers but more than 100 RBI. Slaughter, who played in the Majors from 1938-59, also had one 100 RBI season during which he hit 18 homers. Now that's resourceful. Slaughter, who died in 2002 and took a colorful lexicon with him, would have been in the target demographic for Country magazine. Of that much we can be certain.