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Monday, September 3, 2012
NCAA inspects amateur status of 2

By Peter Yoon
ESPNLosAngeles.com

LOS ANGELES -- UCLA athletic director Dan Guerrero called recent reports of an NCAA investigation into UCLA basketball players "misleading and inaccurate," but in a statement released Monday by the school acknowledged that two Bruins players have yet to receive amateurism certification from the NCAA.

The reports, citing unnamed sources, stated that the NCAA was investigating the eligibility of freshmen Kyle Anderson and Tony Parker as well as the previously confirmed investigation into Shabazz Muhammad. All three are part of a recruiting class ranked No. 1 in the nation.

"Recently, there have been misleading and inaccurate public reports regarding the initial-eligibility certification of our men's basketball team's incoming class," Guerrero's statement said. "Currently, there are two men's basketball student-athletes who have not yet received final amateurism certification from the NCAA."

A source who requested anonymity told ESPNLosAngeles that the two who have not yet been cleared are Muhammad and Anderson. Parker had been the subject of an inquiry, but has since been cleared. There are no further details on the nature of the inquiries into Parker and Anderson.

For the last several months, the NCAA has been investigating whether or not Muhammad received improper benefits during his recruitment. Because of that investigation, Muhammad was not cleared to go on UCLA's three-game exhibition trip to China last month. He also did not participate in practices leading up to the trip.

Anderson and Parker received clearance to participate in the China games, the source said, and both traveled with the team on the Aug. 22-29 trip. Anderson played all three games, but Parker did not play because of a hamstring injury suffered during the practice time leading up to the trip.

Guerrero's statement said UCLA would have no further response to the reports, which were first reported by Scout.com's UCLA site.

"UCLA will not, and cannot, endanger the privacy of our student-athletes or the confidentiality of the process by providing a more specific response at this time to these reports," the statement said.