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Tuesday, August 6, 2013
Andrew Shaw to auction stitches

By Scott Powers
ESPNChicago.com

Chicago Blackhawks forward Andrew Shaw will auction off the stitches he required after taking a puck to the face in Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals this past season and will donate the money to The V Foundation for cancer research.

Andrew Shaw
Andrew Shaw saved the stitches he received in the Stanley Cup finals to help raise money for cancer research.
Shaw was struck on his upper right cheek by a puck shot during the first period of Game 6 on June 24. Shaw immediately fell to the ice and laid still for a few seconds. He was helped off the ice, received stitches in the locker room and later returned to the game to help the Hawks clinch their second Cup in four seasons.

The auction will begin on Aug. 15 and run for 10 days on eBay.com, according to a Facebook page set up for the auction. The auction lot will include the framed stitches, Shaw's autograph and other items.

"Immediately after the finals, I suggested to Andrew that he keep his stitches as we could use them to raise money for a good cause," said AM Sports Marketing Group owner Joel Alpert, who is helping Shaw with the auction. "Andrew said he wanted to support breast cancer research, and from there we came up with the auction concept.

"I chose The V Foundation as they promised me the money would be given directly to grants supporting breast cancer research. I couldn't be happier with the charity we chose."

Shaw took pride in his wounds after the Stanley Cup playoffs.

"I don't know if it's a badge of honor, but it looks pretty cool," Shaw said of his face on June 27.

Shaw had five goals and four assists during the Stanley Cup playoffs.

The V Foundation for Cancer Research, which was formed by ESPN and Jim Valvano in 1993, funds cancer research grants. According to the foundation, it has awarded more than $100 million to more than 100 facilities and awards 100 percent of direct donations and net event proceeds to cancer research.