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Thursday, October 10, 2013
Florida Gators try to stop LSU attack

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- The Florida Gators expect something closer to a shutout than a shootout when they visit No. 10 LSU on Saturday.

LSU/Georgia
LSU quarterback Zach Mettenberger has thrown for 1,738 yards and 15 touchdowns, the most through the first six games in school history.

The Tigers (5-1, 2-1 SEC), led by quarterback Zach Mettenberger, are averaging 45 points and 489 yards a game this season.

"We're not going to allow ourselves to let that happen," Florida defensive tackle Darious Cummings said.

No. 17 Florida (4-1, 3-0), meanwhile, hasn't given up 21 points in any of its last 13 league games.

"I don't think anybody in the country is playing better defense than we are," Cummings said. "We haven't even reached our max yet, so I feel we just have that relentless effort and we're not taking no for an answer. We get challenged week in and week out to be the best."

Mettenberger, under the tutelage of new offensive coordinator Cam Cameron, has thrown for 1,738 yards and 15 touchdowns, the most through the first six games in school history.

"He's more accurate with the ball," Florida coach Will Muschamp said. "I think he's got a better understanding in the passing game. Everybody matures as different ages. I know we're all in an instant-coffee society, where we want it right now, and that's not always the way it is."

The Tigers have scored 100 points the last two games: 41 in a loss at Georgia and 59 in a victory at Mississippi. Mettenberger completed 73 percent of his passes for 712 yards in those outings, with five touchdowns and an interception.

The Gators boast one of the deepest secondaries in the country, and it has benefited from defensive linemen putting pressure on opposing quarterbacks.

"That's kind of been our identity, coming after the quarterback, getting after him, getting hits on the quarterback, pressuring the quarterback, making him make bad decisions," Ronald Powell said. "That's kind of like what we do. That's what we want to do. We want to play physical and force our will on people."