2014 Ryder Cup captain to be named

Updated: December 11, 2012, 5:10 PM ET
ESPN.com news services

The PGA of America will introduce the 2014 U.S. Ryder Cup captain during a segment of the "Today" show Thursday on NBC.

Adding to the intrigue of the announcement is whether the PGA of America will stick to its prototype -- someone who is a former major champion who still plays on the PGA Tour -- or whether it will look deeper into its past for its newest captain.

David Toms, the 2001 PGA champion, has been mentioned most. The 45-year-old fits the mold of recent American Ryder Cup captains who have a major victory, a strong PGA Tour résumé (13 wins), and still close enough to the players who will make the team without expecting to challenge for a playing spot.

Ted Bishop, president of the PGA of America, said at a media luncheon in New York on Tuesday that the selection of the new captain won't be the same as its been in the past.

"We've done something a little bit different this year," Bishop said.

If the PGA of America decides to go in a different direction, one name that has been floated is three-time major winner and World Golf Hall of Famer Larry Nelson, who is 65.

As for the selection process, one former U.S. captain would like to see a change.

"It's time for the PGA of America to put together a Selection Process Committee of former players and captains! @RyderCup2014," tweeted ESPN golf analyst Paul Azinger, who led the Americans to their previous Ryder Cup victory, in 2008 at Valhalla, after drastically overhauling the player selection process.

Last week, Tom Watson said it "would be a great honor" to captain the U.S. Ryder Cup team in 2014. Watson, 63, who won four of his five Open Championships in Scotland, said he has not been approached by the PGA of America, meaning a potential captaincy would be unlikely at this time.

The 40th Ryder Cup will be held at Gleneagles, Scotland, in 2014.

Information from The Associated Press and ESPN.com senior golf writer Bob Harig was used in this report.

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