Kyle Anderson 'likely' to move on

Updated: September 16, 2013, 3:59 PM ET
By Jeff Goodman | ESPN.com

UCLA sophomore Kyle Anderson and his family have decided that this will likely be his final season in college.

"Kyle has made great strides in his mental approach to the game and his work ethic since being at UCLA," his father, Kyle Anderson Sr., told ESPN.com. "The major deficiencies in his overall game are his lack of strength, quickness and explosion, and inconsistent shooting. We feel that both of which can be addressed more efficiently with more time and repetition. It's more than likely that it will be time for Kyle to move on at the end of this college season."

Anderson played primarily off the ball last season for then-coach Ben Howland and averaged 9.7 points, 8.6 rebounds and 3.5 assists. Multiple NBA executives told ESPN.com that Anderson -- who strongly considered leaving -- would have likely been selected somewhere in the first half of the second round had he departed college after last year.

The 2014 draft is much stronger, especially at the top. However, the 6-foot-9 New Jersey native is expected to play more at the point under new coach Steve Alford, although there's some uncertainty in that regard with freshman Bryce Alford -- Steve's son -- joining the team over the summer.

Anderson is a terrific passer whose athleticism, perimeter shot and ability to defend have been questioned. However, his distributing ability was masked last season as Howland decided to put the ball in Larry Drew II's hands much of the time.

The Bruins went 25-10 last season and lost to Minnesota in their first NCAA tournament game. They also lost first-round pick Shabazz Muhammad and Drew, but return Anderson, Jordan Adams, twins David Wear and Travis Wear, and big man Tony Parker.

Oklahoma State point guard Marcus Smart, who decided to return to Oklahoma State despite being a near-lock lottery pick, also has made it clear that, barring injury, he won't be returning beyond this season.

s

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Comments

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, photo & other personal information you make public on Facebook will appear with your comment, and may be used on ESPN's media platforms. Learn more.


ALSO SEE