Carlos Marmol headed to minors

Updated: July 4, 2013, 3:56 PM ET
By Jayson Stark | ESPN.com

The Los Angeles Dodgers outrighted Carlos Marmol to the minor leagues Thursday after the reliever cleared waivers without being claimed and then waived his right to refuse his assignment to the minors.

Marmol is expected to report to Triple-A Albuquerque in a few days, but will initially go to the Dodgers' spring training facility at Camelback Ranch in Arizona.

The Dodgers obtained Marmol from the Chicago Cubs in a trade Tuesday, with the intention of sending him to the minors so he can work on fixing his delivery issues in a setting other than a big league pennant race.

One source said Marmol "agreed to work with" the Dodgers and go to the minors as a condition of the trade that sent him to Los Angeles after eight often-turbulent seasons with the Cubs. Because he has more than six years of major league service time, Marmol would have had the right to decline an outright assignment to the minor leagues.

However, the sources indicated he agreed in advance to waive that right if he cleared waivers.

Marmol has approximately $4.8 million in salary remaining between now and the rest of the season, and he would receive his full salary even if he returns to the minor leagues. Sources said the Cubs have agreed to pay nearly $2 million of that amount. The Cubs also took on all of the $2.375 million still owed to the pitcher who was traded for Marmol, reliever Matt Guerrier.

When the dust had settled, the Dodgers are paying only about $500,000 more than they would have owed Guerrier for the rest of the season, but also received $209,700 in additional international signing bonus cap dollars.

If the Dodgers decide Marmol can't get back to his form of 2010-11 -- when he saved 72 games and struck out 237 hitters in 151 2/3 innings -- and they then release him and another club signs him, the Cubs have agreed to pay the Dodgers an additional portion of Marmol's salary, sources said.

Jayson Stark | email

Senior Writer, ESPN.com

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