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Young earns first MLB win

BOSTON (AP) -- Even Hollywood couldn't prolong Boston's winning
streak.

The Red Sox lost for the first time in 11 games, falling to the
Texas Rangers 8-6 Saturday and missing a chance to pull within 1½
games of the New York Yankees in the AL East.

With actors Drew Barrymore and Jimmy Fallon seated near the Red
Sox on-deck circle as a crew filmed scenes for a movie about
opening day at Fenway, the streak ended with a little-known
right-hander stopping the hottest team in the majors for his first
big league win.

On hand to film "Fever Pitch," the two stars changed costumes
a handful of times during the game. They jumped up and joined the
cheering fans along the first-base line as the Red Sox rallied in
the seventh, then again after the Yankees' final score was posted
on the left-field scoreboard.

Chris Young, a 25-year-old righty making just his third big
league start, held the Red Sox to one run and two hits in 5 2-3
innings. Young (1-1) relied mostly on fastballs with an occasional
curve and changeup thrown in.

"We scored some runs and Chris was outstanding," Texas manager
Buck Showalter said.

The Red Sox, who had won 10 straight and 16 of 17 to climb from
10½ games back in the AL East, remained 2½ games behind the
division-leading Yankees. New York lost to Baltimore, 7-0, and had
the Red Sox won, they could have pulled within 1½ games for the
first time since June 2, when they began the day one game back.

It was Boston's longest winning streak since capturing 12
straight Aug. 3-14, 1995, the year the Red Sox last won the AL East
title. Since then, New York has won seven of eight division crowns.

Boston had picked up eight games on the Yankees in 19 days.

"I couldn't let that stuff affect me," Young said of Boston's
run. "If you get wrapped up in that stuff, you're done before you
start."

Michael Young hit a three-run homer and Rod Barajas went 3-for-4
with a two-run shot for Texas, which snapped a five-game losing
streak and pulled within six games of the Red Sox in the AL
wild-card race.

Mark Bellhorn hit his second career grand slam and David Ortiz
added a solo shot for Boston, which rallied from an 8-1 deficit
with a five-run seventh.

"Right now we've got a lot of confidence," Kevin Millar said.
"We were down 8-1 in the seventh inning and then all of a sudden
we made a game of it."

After Dave Roberts singled with one out in the ninth, Bellhorn
came to the plate representing the tying run and grounded into a
double play to end the game -- and Boston's winning streak.

Jeff Nelson walked three in the seventh to set up Bellhorn's
grand slam off Ron Mahay. After Ortiz's 34th homer, Doug Brocail
came on and retired the only four batters he faced.

Francisco Cordero worked the ninth for his 42nd save in 45
opportunities.

The Rangers broke a 25-inning scoreless string with a three-run
second. Kevin Mench had an RBI single, Laynce Nix a run-scoring
grounder and Barajas added an RBI single, making it 3-0.

Boston cut it to 3-1 in the bottom of the inning when Millar led
off with a double, advanced on Orlando Cabrera's ground out and
scored on Bill Mueller's bouncer to second.

Tim Wakefield (11-8) took the loss, giving up eight runs and
eight hits in six-plus innings.

"I left with eight runs on the board," Wakefield said. "I am
not happy about it."

Barajas' two-run homer over the Green Monster in the fourth made
it 5-1. It was the Rangers' first homer in five games, ending their
longest homerless stretch since May 2002.

Michael Young's homer chased Wakefield and made it 8-1 in the
seventh. A huge cheer went up in the bottom of the inning when the
left-field scoreboard showed Baltimore leading New York 7-0.

Game notes
Ortiz was back in the lineup after missing the previous two
games with a sore right shoulder, which he injured sliding into
home last Sunday. ... Red Sox CF Johnny Damon was out for the
second straight game with a sore right pinkie, which he hurt diving
into first on a pickoff throw Thursday. ... Texas OF David Dellucci
didn't play after leaving Friday's game with lightheadedness. ...
Author and longtime Red Sox fan Stephen King threw out the first
pitch.