Clayton Kershaw among 146 to file

Updated: January 15, 2014, 11:02 AM ET
ESPN.com news services

Reigning Cy Young Award winners Clayton Kershaw of the Los Angeles Dodgers and Max Scherzer of the Detroit Tigers were among the 146 players who filed for salary arbitration Tuesday after being unable to work out long-term contract extensions with their teams.

Tampa Bay Rays pitcher David Price, Pittsburgh Pirates third baseman Pedro Alvarez, Cincinnati Reds pitcher Aroldis Chapman, Arizona Diamondbacks outfielder Mark Trumbo, Baltimore Orioles catcher Matt Wieters and first baseman Chris Davis, and Washington Nationals pitcher Jordan Zimmermann also filed.

[+] EnlargeClayton Kershaw
Elsa/Getty ImagesClayton Kershsaw could be in line for a record deal for an arbitration-eligible player.

Players are set to swap proposed salaries with their clubs Friday, and hearings will be scheduled for next month in St. Petersburg, Fla.

Kershaw, 25, is in his final season before free agency and could command a record deal for an arbitration-eligible player. With two Cy Young awards in the past three seasons and three straight ERA titles, Kershaw made $11 million last season. The last pitcher to win two Cy Young awards entering his final year of arbitration, Tim Lincecum, signed a two-year deal with the San Francisco Giants with an average annual value of $20 million.

The Dodgers haven't had a case reach arbitration since 2007.

Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen and catcher A.J. Ellis also filed Tuesday. Jansen is eligible for arbitration for the first time. Ellis made $2 million in 2013 and is in his second season of eligibility.

The Dodgers figure to blow past the luxury tax threshold again and could break their own National League payroll record. After signing their three arbitration-eligible players, they will have 24 players under contract at a combined salary of more than $240 million.

Of the 133 players who filed last year, none went to hearings -- the first time since the process began in 1974 that every case settled. After peaking at 35 hearings in 1986, the number of cases argued hasn't reached double digits since 2001.

Players in arbitration averaged a 119 percent increase last year, according to a study by The Associated Press.

Information from ESPNLosAngeles.com's Mark Saxon and The Associated Press was used in this report.

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