Brian Wilson becomes free agent

Updated: December 1, 2012, 1:04 AM ET
ESPN.com news services

The San Francisco Giants declined to tender a one-year contract to bearded closer Brian Wilson on Friday, making him a free agent as he recovers from a second ligament replacement surgery on his right elbow.

Wilson was among a handful of big names non-tendered before Friday's deadline, joining Mark Reynolds, Jair Jurrjens, Mike Pelfrey and Jack Hannahan.

Teams had until midnight EST on Friday to make 2013 offers to unsigned players on 40-man rosters.

Wilson
Wilson
Reynolds
Reynolds

Wilson was the 2010 major league saves leader with 48, but made only two appearances for the World Series champion Giants in 2012 after experiencing further elbow trouble in April.

Wilson underwent reconstructive Tommy John surgery April 19, his second such procedure on his pitching elbow after also having it done while in college at LSU in 2003. Dr. James Andrews performed both operations. Wilson missed the team's run to its second championship in three years.

"It's really a snail's pace at this time," Giants GM Brian Sabean said of Wilson's current rehab regimen. "Not a ton expected. He's throwing 60 feet flat ground."

The 30-year-old Wilson, who earned $8.5 million in his injury-shortened 2012 season, would be due to make at least $6.8 million next year under the rule limiting cuts to a maximum of 20 percent.

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, the Giants would like to sign Wilson to an incentive-laden deal with a lower-based salary due to questions with his elbow. However, the report, citing sources, states Wilson has no plans to negotiate with the team due to its stance.

Reynolds hit .221 with 23 homers and 69 RBIs last season for the Orioles. His home run output was down from 37 in 2011 and his fewest since his rookie year in 2007.

Reynolds struggled at third base early last season and was moved to first, where he played exceptionally well.

Last month, the Orioles declined Reynolds' $11 million option for 2013, opting for the $500,000 buyout. Friday's move enabled Baltimore to avoid going to arbitration with Reynolds.

Chris Davis moves atop the depth chart at first base.

Baltimore also declined to tender second baseman Omar Quintanilla and right-hander Stu Pomeranz. The moves were announced Friday night.

Jurrjens, an All-Star in 2011, was non-tendered by the Braves after getting demoted to the minors last season. Atlanta also declined to offer a 2013 contract to reliever Peter Moylan, but claimed right-hander David Carpenter off waivers from Boston.

The Red Sox cut ties with outfielder Ryan Sweeney and pitchers Scott Atchison and Rich Hill. Hannahan was let go by Cleveland, clearing the way for youngster Lonnie Chisenhall to start at third base.

Pelfrey, a 15-game winner in 2010, made only three starts this year before having season-ending Tommy John surgery on his pitching elbow. The Mets let him go Friday, along with outfielder Andres Torres and reliever Manny Acosta.

Third baseman Ian Stewart (Cubs) and reliever Daniel Schlereth (Tigers) were not offered contracts, either.

The Texas Rangers did not offer 2013 contracts to catcher Geovany Soto, infielder Brandon Snyder and right-handed pitcher Jake Brigham. The Rangers are hopeful they can still re-sign Soto, who was acquired from the Cubs at the trade deadline in July.

In other moves, the Angels claimed outfielder Scott Cousins off waivers from Seattle, the Yankees claimed right-hander Jim Miller off waivers from Oakland, and Miami claimed first baseman-outfielder Joe Mahoney off waivers from Baltimore.

Arizona released right-hander Brad Bergesen, and the Yankees designated infielder Jayson Nix for assignment.

Players agreeing to one-year contracts that avoided arbitration included Kansas City second baseman Chris Getz ($1.05 million), Oakland first baseman Daric Barton ($1.1 million) and infielder Adam Rosales ($700,000), and Indians right-hander Blake Wood ($560,000).

Information from ESPNDallas.com's Richard Durrett and The Associated Press was used in this report.

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