Douglas Clark HR lifts Yaquis in 18th

Updated: February 8, 2013, 9:34 AM ET
ESPN.com news services

HERMOSILLO, Mexico -- Douglas Clark, a Springfield, Mass., native and 15-year minor league veteran playing in his third Mexican League season, hit a home run in the top of the 18th inning and Mexico's Yaquis de Obregon beat the Dominican Republic's Escogido Leones 4-3 to take the Caribbean Series final in a record 7-hour, 28-minute game.

This is the second Caribbean Series title in three years for the Yaquis and the seventh for Mexican teams. It was the longest Caribbean Series game in history, breaking the previous record of 6 hours, 13 minutes in 2007 when Tony Batista's bases-loaded sacrifice fly in the 18th gave the Dominican Republic a 4-3 victory over Venezuela. The 21 pitchers used in the game also set a Caribbean Series record.

Ricardo Nanita, who has played 11 seasons in the minor leagues, took Baltimore Orioles reliever Luis Ayala deep to lead off the bottom of the ninth for the Dominican Republic and tie the game at two.

Mexico managed four hits in 13 innings before Karim Garcia led off the top of the 14th with a go-ahead solo homer. But the Dominicans tied it again in the bottom of the inning when Miguel Tejada smacked a two-out, game-tying RBI single.

Clark was a former University of Massachusetts football player picked by the San Francisco Giants in the seventh round of the 1998 draft. He played 14 games between the Giants and the Oakland Athletics before heading to Asia and then Mexico.

The 36-year-old caught a fastball from Dominican reliever Edward Valdez with one out in the top of the 18th, sending it just over the right-field fence.

A capacity crowd of 16,000 fans turned out to watch the game played in Hermosillo's new Estadio Sonora, which was inaugurated on Feb. 1 to kick off the Caribbean Series.

The Culiacan Tomateros, winners in 1996 and 2002, are the only other Mexican team to win two Caribbean Series titles.

Information from Enrique Rojas, ESPNDeportes.com and The Associated Press was used in this report.

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