<
>

Dwyane Wade: Best I've felt in years

MIAMI -- Dwyane Wade credits improved health and a recent change in his workout routine as the driving forces behind his recent surge in production amid the Miami Heat's push to make the playoffs.

"This is the best I've felt in years right now," Wade said Wednesday. "You question it. And you try not to question it, like 'Why? Why couldn't I feel like this the last two years?' But it is what it is. I'm feeling like this now, when I need it individually to (carry) more of a load to help this team."

The quiet moment of reflection for Wade came as he sat in his locker after he scored 32 points to help rally the Heat late in a 108-104 victory against the Portland Trail Blazers. It was the seventh consecutive game Wade has scored at least 25 points, marking his longest such streak since eight in a row in 2010.

Wade has regained his rhythm at just the right time for the Heat (31-36), who followed Monday's 14-point victory against LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers with Wednesday's impressive finish against Portland.

Miami has won six of its last nine games, including three in a row at home to move into seventh place in the East in a tight race with Boston, Indiana and Charlotte for the final two playoff spots.

Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said the team's strategy has been simplified in recent weeks as Wade started to regain his form after dealing with three separate hamstring injuries before the All-Star break.

Wade has averaged 29.1 points and shot 53 percent from the field over the last seven games.

"He understands the moment right now," Spoelstra said of his expectations for Wade. "We don't have to talk about it. It's, 'Here's the ball. Make a play for the team.' Quite frankly in the fourth quarter, the best offense really was to get the ball to Dwyane and let him create some kind of action."

That hasn't always been a luxury for the Heat. Wade, 33, has missed 18 games this season, including the three stretches to recover from the hamstring strains.

He also dealt with nagging knee injuries that limited his play near the end of each of the past three seasons. Despite Wade's injury issues, the Heat made four straight trips to the Finals and won consecutive championships in 2012 and 2013 with a team also anchored by James and Chris Bosh.

With James back in Cleveland and Bosh sidelined for the rest of the season to recover from blood clots in his lungs, the bulk of the leadership and production has shifted to Wade. An 11-time All-Star in his 12th season, Wade said he recently started his workout routine a few hours earlier than normal on game nights and has been spending more time on the court with assistant coach and former NBA forward Juwan Howard to simulate the bigger defenders he faces on switches.

But the ultimate source of Wade's success is his health. He reached toward the side of his locker Wednesday night and knocked against the wooden frame, having played in 14 of the past 15 games. Wade leads the league in fourth-quarter scoring after adding 15 of his 32 in the final period Wednesday, including the Heat's final eight points of the game.

"It feels good, man," said Wade, who is averaging 21.8 points, 5.2 assists and 3.7 rebounds in 49 games. "I've taken a lot of criticism and I've worked very hard on my body to get to the point where I know, fourth quarter, it shows. That means a lot to me. When everyone is tired, I go up a notch. And for an old guy, that's not bad at all to have that extra level to go to."