Andre Gurode visits Seattle

Updated: August 30, 2011, 10:30 PM ET
ESPN.com news services

Pro Bowl center Andre Gurode, cut Monday by the Dallas Cowboys, visited the Seattle Seahawks on Tuesday.

Seahawks offensive line coach Tom Cable was on the coaching staff at the University of Colorado, where Gurode played before being selected by the Cowboys in the second round of the 2002 draft.

"He's had a great career. It kind of ended suddenly, abruptly (with Dallas) for him and he got caught in this deal and not sure where he fits, so he wanted to take a look around and see what's out there," Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said Tuesday. "We've had guys come in almost every day and we'll continue to do that."

A source told ESPN.com's John Clayton that six teams have contacted Gurode, who has made the Pro Bowl the last five seasons, since he was released. Seattle is his first visit.

The Cowboys cut the veteran center Monday for a variety of reasons that included his age and salary, his decision to have knee surgery so late in the offseason that it sidelined him for the start of camp and by the performance by an undrafted, unproven second-year player (Phil Costa) in Gurode's absence.

"What we've said right from Day 1 is it doesn't really matter where you came from or what you've done in the past," Cowboys coach Jason Garrett said Monday. "We're going to try our best as coaches and evaluators to see what you're doing right now and see what you can do for us going forward. We try to do that individually, we try to do that collectively. We're not in the business of trying to send a message to the rest of the team. We're trying to make the best decision for our team."

Gurode got a chance to reclaim the job once he was healthy, moving straight to the first team and starting the second preseason game. But the Cowboys decided he wasn't so much better than Costa that he was worth keeping, not when they could also save $5.5 million against the salary cap by cutting Gurode. They liked the idea of finding out what they might have in a 24-year-old instead of relying on a 32-year-old coming off knee surgery.

Information from ESPN.com senior NFL writer John Clayton and The Associated Press was used in this report.

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