Cardinals' Darnell Dockett fined $30,000

Updated: December 30, 2011, 7:11 PM ET
ESPN.com news services

NEW YORK -- Arizona defensive tackle Darnell Dockett has been fined $15,000 by the NFL for hitting Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton below the knees and another $15,000 for a horse-collar tackle on Bengals running back Bernard Scott.

Dockett was called for 15-yard penalties on each play in the Cardinals' 23-16 loss last Saturday.

New England wide receiver Wes Welker was fined $10,000 this week after wearing an unauthorized hat during his postgame interview following Sunday's win over the Dolphins, a league spokesman confirmed.

Welker commented on the fine in a tweet Friday, writing "Thanks for warning me the other 16 weeks I wore the hat."

For his Friday chat with reporters in the locker room, Welker opted for a simple Patriots winter hat, instead of the baseball cap for the energy bar company he promotes.

Washington safety Reed Doughty was fined $15,000 by the league on Friday for striking Minnesota's Christian Ponder in the head and neck area as the quarterback slid.

Houston defensive end J.J. Watt received a similar fine for hitting Indianapolis quarterback Dan Orlovsky below the knee.

Among other fines, 49ers offensive tackle Anthony Davis was docked $10,000 for unnecessary roughness. While blocking an opponent, he unnecessarily rolled up on the player's leg.

And Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch was fined $10,000 for wearing cleats with a Skittles pattern against the 49ers, sources told ESPN NFL Insider Adam Schefter. Lynch was fined for a violation of the league's uniform policy.

Seahawks linebacker Adrian Moten was fined $7,500 for unnecessary roughness (struck opponent late). Teammate Richard Sherman, a cornerback, was fined $15,000 for unnecessary roughness for a horse-collar tackle.

Information from The Associated Press, ESPN NFL Insider Adam Schefter, ESPNBoston.com's Mike Reiss and ESPN.com's Mike Sando was used in this report.

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