Raiders' Hue Jackson being evaluated

Updated: January 9, 2012, 5:30 PM ET
ESPN.com news services

New Oakland Raiders general manager Reggie McKenzie is contemplating whether to keep Hue Jackson as coach, league sources told ESPN senior NFL analyst Chris Mortensen. Agent Kennard McGuire, who represents both men, has denied that Jackson would be let go.

McKenzie, a former Raiders player and Green Bay Packers executive, will be introduced Tuesday as the Raiders' GM. He will become the first Raiders executive to hold the title of GM, and sources told Mortensen that McKenzie is contemplating whether he should bring in his own coach, despite the relationship with Jackson.

Fox Sports reported Sunday that McKenzie and Jackson would meet on Monday.

McGuire told CBS Sports that McKenzie planned to "come in this week and evaluate the entire organization."

The 48-year-old McKenzie will fulfill many of the duties handled by iconic owner Al Davis until his Oct. 8 death at age 82.

Jackson handled many personnel decisions in recent months after Davis' death. Jackson, who just completed his first season as head coach after being elevated from offensive coordinator, pulled off the highly debated October trade for quarterback Carson Palmer after starter Jason Campbell broke his collarbone.

McKenzie will take over his new job with the Raiders immediately, meaning he will leave the defending Super Bowl champion Packers (15-1) before they open defense of their title. The NFC's No. 1 seed hosts the New York Giants on Sunday.

Oakland has gone without someone in a true GM role since Davis' longtime senior assistant, Bruce Allen, departed for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers after the 2003 season. Allen had been a top personnel executive for Davis from 1996-2003. Davis' son, Mark, is now making many top decisions.

Oakland went 8-8 this season after a promising 7-4 start, ending its playoff chances by losing four of the final five games. The Raiders have missed the postseason for the last nine years since losing in the Super Bowl after the 2002 season.

Information from ESPN senior NFL analyst Chris Mortensen and The Associated Press was used in this report.