Tim Tebow: NFL just like SEC

Updated: February 3, 2012, 1:58 PM ET
ESPN.com news services

INDIANAPOLIS -- Tim Tebow says the NFL is a lot like the SEC.

The Denver Broncos quarterback said Thursday he was told the NFL was going to be different than college football. But he disagrees. He played with so many NFL-bound players in high school and at Florida that every Sunday felt like facing "LSU or Auburn."

"Tebowmania" swept the country after Tebow led the Broncos on a six-game winning streak that included four straight fourth-quarter comebacks. His best play came in the wild card round, when he connected with Demaryius Thomas on an 80-yard touchdown on the first play of overtime to beat heavily favored Pittsburgh.

Tebow made his comments during a taping of "NBC Sports Talk Live from the Super Bowl." The interview is being shown during Thursday night's show.

He made the media rounds at the Super Bowl on Thursday, talking about everything from what he needs to work on before next season to his admiration for Eli Manning and Tom Brady to his video game rivalry with his brother.

"You play the game to be in a game like this," he said. "It's definitely a dream to be in a game like this."

Tebow's detractors have said he'd be better suited to play running back in the NFL than quarterback, with an unorthodox throwing motion. But Broncos boss John Elway has already declared Tebow the starter going into next season's training camp, and the quarterback said he knows where he needs to improve.

"Definitely my footwork and drops," he said. "Getting from receiver to receiver, my progressions. I continue to try and work on things and I was very blessed to have a good quarterback coach in Mike McCoy. But, ultimately, I'm just going out there and playing football."

Asked whether he'd prefer to run or throw a pass if he had only one play to win a game, Tebow said he didn't care.

"Probably the pass because I can get one more player involved in the game," he said. "As long as we get a W, I don't care how it happens."

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.