Jags add Laurent Robinson

Updated: March 14, 2012, 11:18 PM ET
ESPN.com news services

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- The Jacksonville Jaguars have a new No. 1 receiver and a new backup quarterback.

The Jaguars and Laurent Robinson agreed to a five-year, $32.5 million contract Wednesday evening. The deal includes $14 million guaranteed.

Jacksonville also added former Dolphins quarterback Chad Henne on a two-year deal.

Henne started the 2011 season as Miami's starter and was off to the best start of his career statistically until he separated his shoulder against the San Diego Chargers in Week 4. He threw for 868 yards, four touchdowns and four interceptions for the Dolphins. Henne also had a career-high 79.0 passer rating.

Henne will back up 2011 first-round pick Blaine Gabbert.

The 26-year-old Robinson caught 54 passes for 858 yards and 11 touchdowns last season, a breakout year for a guy who was cut in training camp by San Diego and waived again after a week in Dallas. The Cowboys re-signed him a week later.

Robinson became in demand when several top free agent receivers were off the market, including Vincent Jackson, Marques Colston, Reggie Wayne and Pierre Garcon. The Jaguars desperately needed someone to pair with Gabbert, but many will wonder if Jacksonville overpaid for a receiver with 143 career catches and 15 touchdowns.

Nonetheless, the Jaguars only can hope Robinson works out better than all the other No. 1 receivers the team has rolled though Jacksonville since Jimmy Smith retired six years ago.

Reggie Williams, Matt Jones, Jerry Porter, Dennis Northcutt and even Mike Thomas failed to give the team the kind of playmaking ability missing since Smith abruptly walked away from football following the 2005 season.

The Jaguars also re-signed defensive end Jeremy Mincey and agreed to terms with backup defensive tackle C.J. Mosley.

Mincey signed a four-year contract worth $20 million, including $9 million guaranteed -- an $8 million signing bonus and a guaranteed salary of $1 million in 2012. Mosley's deal is for three years and worth up to $10 million.

Information from The Associated Press contributed to this report.