Jason Taylor joins ESPN

Updated: June 6, 2012, 8:13 PM ET
ESPN.com news services

Six-time Pro Bowler Jason Taylor, who retired after the 2011 season, is joining ESPN as an NFL analyst.

The 2006 NFL Defensive Player of the Year will appear on "NFL Live", "NFL32", "SportsCenter" and both the Sunday and Monday "Countdown" shows. He also will make appearances on ESPN Radio.

Taylor
Taylor

"For the past 15 NFL seasons, I walked into a locker room, players' lounge or training room and always knew that a television would be tuned in to ESPN," Taylor said in a statement from the network. "I am extremely excited to be joining their team now and look forward to contributing to analysis that is regarded by players, coaches and fans as the worldwide leader in NFL and overall sports coverage."

In 15 seasons (13 with the Miami Dolphins, one each with the New York Jets and Washington Redskins), Taylor had 139½ sacks, which ranks sixth all-time. He also had six fumble returns for touchdowns, an NFL record.

His best season was in 2006, when he was chosen as the NFL's best defensive player. That season he had 13½ sacks, forced 10 fumbles and returned two interceptions for scores.

Taylor scored nine touchdowns, the most by any player whose primary position was the defensive line and who entered the league after 1970. He also holds a Dolphins record with 27 fumble recoveries.

"Jason worked as a guest analyst in studio on a few shows last year and we were extremely impressed with his performance and the depth of knowledge he was able to share with viewers," Seth Markman, ESPN senior coordinating producer for NFL studio shows, said in the statement. "He comes across as smooth on the air as he was in rushing the passer all those years as a player, and we expect him to make a big impact right away on our ESPN team."

Dolphins legend Dan Marino congratulated Taylor on Twitter, writing: "Congratulations to @JasonTaylor on joining #ESPN. You will be as great of an analyst as you were a player."

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.